We are currently re-examining our map collection.

Let us know if our map collection is important to your research and what are key maps for you. All feedback on our map collection is welcome. We want to hear from you! Let us know by emailing hssd.library@ubc.ca.


This session is appropriate for students conducting literature reviews in any discipline.
Topics include
… what is a literature review?
… finding the right databases
… search strategies for databases
… finding scholarly articles, theses and dissertations, books, and more
… resources to help you keep track of your research.
There will be plenty of hands-on time for searching, and assistance from the two presenting librarians.

 

 

Census GIS is the topic for this month’s GIS Users Group meeting.  Tom Brittnacher, the GIS Librarian, will be talking about how to get census data and geographic boundaries out of SimplyMap and Abacus, and into GIS.

Wednesday, March 28
3:00 – 4:00 PM
Koerner Library, Level 2, Room 216

Spatial aspects of health research will be the theme of this month’s UBC GIS Users Group meeting.  We will have three presenters, each giving a brief description of their use of GIS and mapping in health research.  If there’s time, we’ll follow with a general discussion about the use of GIS technology and data in health research.

Event details:
Wednesday, February 29, 2012
3:00 – 4:00pm
Koerner Library, Level 2, Room 216

Presentations:

“Three Projects Applying GIS in Public Health: Mapping Local Social Barriers to Sexual Health Clinics in Two Rural Communities, Provincial Emergency/Hormonal Contraceptive Use Trough Time, and National Abortion Travel Patterns.”
Anthony Smith, Human Early Learning Partnership Knowledge Translation Team

“Neighbourhood Environment in Waterloo Region:  Patterns of Transportation and Health”
Josh van Loon, School of Community and Regional Planning Active Transportation Lab

“Spatial Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Canada: Examining the Role of Air Pollution and Neighborhood Deprivation”
Perry Hystad, PhD Candidate, School of Population and Public Health

Bodenhamer, David J., John Corrigan, and Trevor M. Harris. The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010.

From the publisher’s description:

The Spatial Humanities aims to re-orient—and perhaps revolutionize—humanities scholarship by critically engaging the technology and specifically directing it to the subject matter of the humanities. To this end, the contributors explore the potential of spatial methods such as text-based geographical analysis, multimedia GIS, animated maps, deep contingency, deep mapping, and the geo-spatial semantic web.

Browse a Google Preview of The Spatial Humanities here.

Image: Inuktituk Dialect Map , created by Asybaris01

 

If you’ve ever wondered about the future of the book, have a look at these:

Living Books About Life is a series of curated, open access books about life — with life understood both philosophically and biologically — which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. Produced by a globally-distributed network of writers and editors, the books in the series repackage existing open access science research by clustering it around selected topics whose unifying theme is life: e.g., air, agriculture, bioethics, cosmetic surgery, electronic waste, energy, neurology and pharmacology.”  (from Living Books About Life)

Cover photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/simonwheatley/5128638903/ under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ license.

 

 

 

To celebrate the 2011 release of Beaujolais Nouveau, we’re featuring a link to Metro Wine Map of France (opens in new window) designed by Dr. David Gissen as a wonderful example of mapping and data visualization.

To learn more about geographic information, see GIS Services, a part of Humanities and Social Sciences Division at Koerner Library.

 

Photo credit: Sergei Melkonov at flickr

 

“History Unmasked with GIS: Politics and agriculture in Victorian Britain” is the topic for October’s GIS Users Group, presented by Stephen Peplow.  Stephen is a PhD candidate in Land and Food Systems.  His research includes a fascinating use of GIS and spatial analysis to study 19th century Britain.

Please note DIFFERENT DAY AND TIME:
Tuesday, October 25
3:00pm
Koerner Library Level 2, Room 216

All are welcome to attend.

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Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

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