Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC closed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


What will we eat when we need to feed 11 billion people globally by 2100?* With rapid population increase and climate change coupled with the focus on cash crops and loss of food diversity, is a fundamental shift in our diets and the way our food is supplied essential for us to be able to feed ourselves equitably worldwide? Hear from chef, restauranteur and climate change activist, Meeru Dhalwala, on her insights on these and other aspects of our future food sources.

*Sources: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/18/world-population-new-study-11bn-2100

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/346/6206/234

@MeeruDhalwala

Moderated by Rickey Yada, BSc’77, MSc’80, PhD’84 – Dean and Professor, UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Dyson, Tim. Population and Food: Global Trends and Future Prospects. London: Routledge, 1996. Print. [Available at Koerner Library – HD9000.5 .D97 1996]

Murphy, Elaine M. Food and Population: A Global Concern. Washington, D.C. : Population Reference Bureau, Inc., 1984. Print. [Available at Koerner Library – HD9000.5 .M87 1984]

on Agriculture, S., & Forestry. (2014). Innovation in agriculture: The key to feeding a growing population Canada. Senate Committee Reports. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Dietetics and Nutrition

Food Science

Health Statistics & Data

Population and Public Health

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