The Education Library collection includes resources that support a number of activities, including educational research and teaching–both in the Faculty of Education and in K-12 schools. On our shelves, you will find picture books and curriculum items alongside scholarly works. Our hope is that you approach and evaluate all materials in our collection, and those you encounter in other libraries and classrooms, with a critically literate disposition.

 

What is Critical Literacy?

McNicol (2016) describes critical literacy in the following way: “critical literacy is concerned with the social and cultural contexts in which texts (including not simply written texts, but digital texts, multimedia, visual materials and so forth) are both created and read….The approach taken in critical literacy is not to read texts in isolation, but to develop an understanding of the cultural, ideological and sociolinguistic contexts in which they are created and read” (p. xi). Critical literacy requires us to go beyond what we read on the page to consider the larger narrative in which a text is situated, asking questions about who created a text and why.

Watch educator Dr. Allen Luke further discuss critical literacy, and the role of teaching in developing a critically literate approach to texts, in the following video:

The Learning Exchange. (2018). Allen Luke: Critical literacy.
Retrieved from https://thelearningexchange.ca/videos/allan-luke-critical-literacy-2/
Note that closed captions are available.

 

Indigenous Materials in the Education Library

The texts by and about Indigenous peoples in the Library collection have been added to our shelves (both physical and virtual) over the course of decades and, together, offer multiple representations of Indigenous peoples. In some cases, those representations are inauthentic, problematic, and inaccurate. Those materials remain in the collection to support current and future research but may be unsuitable for use in K-12 schools, at least without properly contextualizing and carefully considering the purpose behind their use. We encourage teacher candidates to apply a critically literate approach to selecting materials from the Library to support their teaching about Indigenous peoples, perspectives, and principles of learning, seeking authenticity in the texts they choose.

According to the First Nations Education Steering Committee (2016), authentic texts are “historical or contemporary texts that:

  • present authentic First Peoples voices (i.e., are created by First Peoples or through the substantial contributions of First Peoples);
  • depict themes and issues that are important within First Peoples cultures…;
  • incorporate First Peoples story-telling techniques and features as applicable….” (“What are Authentic First Peoples Texts?”)

To get a sense of the varying representations of Indigenous peoples found in our collection, have a look at some of the problematic titles we’ve pulled for the display. Then, compare them with the authentic alternatives. What differences do you see?

 

References

McNicol, S. (2016). Critical literacy for information professionals. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/yyoaoxoz

The Learning Exchange. (2018). Allen Luke: Critical literacy. Retrieved from https://thelearningexchange.ca/videos/allan-luke-critical-literacy-2/

First Nations Education Steering Committee. (2016). Authentic First Peoples resources k-9. Retrieved from http://www.fnesc.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PUBLICATION-61502-updated-FNESC-Authentic-Resources-Guide-October-2016.pdf

Teaching Through Telling: The RavenSpace Publishing Project

Date and time: June 4 from 9 am – 3:30 pm

Location: UBC Education Library, 2125 Main Mall (inside Neville Scarfe Education Building)

This multimodal event showcases stories – oral, visual, and virtual storytelling on display all day! Come hear stories, and learn about how to use storytelling in the classroom. From 9-11 learn about Musqueam culture through a blend of storytelling and animation with “Musqueam Stories Transformed.” From 1:30-3, learn how to use storytelling in the classroom with a multimodal display in “Teachings for the Classroom – Connecting the BC New Curriculum to As I Remember It.”

Throughout the day, browse the exhibition of Indigenous children’s literature and take a break with some refreshments.

Speakers include:

  • Elsie Paul (lead author As I Remember It)
  • Paige Raibmon (UBC History Department and co-author of As I Remember It)
  • Liz Krieg (Aboriginal education specialist contributing to As I Remember It)
  • Dave Shott (Lantern Films producer collaborating with author groups to create animations for Musqueam Stories Transformed and As I Remember It)

https://www.congress2019.ca/

 

Where: Scarfe 155 – Education Library
When: January 24, 12:00-2:00 Drop-in

Join us in Scarfe 155 for some calming and creative activities! Unwind with some colouring, try your hand at blackout poetry, craft your own puppet, or take a picture in our green screen photo booth.


Join us to meet with the educators from MediaSmarts to find out more how to equip your students to successfully and ethically navigate the digital world. Join us to learn about essential digital literacy skills and competencies, understand the digital experiences of Canadian youth, and familiarize yourself with the resources and tools that are available through the digital literacy framework and Media Smarts web site.

When:  4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m, December 5, 2017

 

Where: Scarfe 155, Education Library, UBC

 

Please RSVP joanne.naslund@ubc.ca

First Canadian institution to provide access to this historical resource.

The University of British Columbia Archives recently assisted the Canadian Music Centre in British Columbia in the production of a short documentary film on the work of composer, ethnomusicologist, and UBC School of Music professor Elliot Weisgarber.

The film is part of CMC BC’s Legacy Composer Film Series, celebrating the first generation of Canadian composers to write Western concert music on the West Coast of Canada.  The films each honour one of five B.C. composers, in addition to Weisgarber:  Murray Adaskin, Barbara Pentland, Rudolf Komorous, and Jean Coulthard.  According to CMC BC, “Each of them contributed something unique, completely new and remarkable to the nation’s cultural mosaic, both through their body of work and the living legacy of students they inspired”.

The six-minute film, directed by John Bolton, is titled Aki-No-Hinode (Japanese for “Autumn Sunrise”), after one of Weisgarber’s short works for flute and piano.  Weisgarber’s daughter, Karen Suzanne Smithson, discovered the previously-unknown piece in her parents’ garage in 2002 while sorting through some of her father’s belongings looking for manuscripts to donate to the Archives.

Throughout the film, the sparse notes of Weisgarber’s composition, played on flute and piano, can be heard in the background, while the camera focusses on the manuscripts.  An emotional highlight is Smithson’s story of her discovery of the Aki-No-Hinode manuscript, and playing it “possibly for the first time”.

Aki-No-Hinode was shot in the Mackenzie Seminar Room in UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, with additional scenes showing the Automated Storage and Retrieval System (ASRS) where the Weisgarber manuscripts are stored.  Karen Smithson and archivist Erwin Wodarczak are featured.  Smithson talks about her father and his work, his fascination with Asian music, and how as a composer he was a pioneer in incorporating Asian (in particular Japanase) influences and instrumentation into Western concert music.  Wodarczak describes how archival collections are stored and can be retrieved from the ASRS.  “There’s a story behind every document, behind every collection” like Weisgarber’s, he says, and describes how gratifying it is when such collections are entrusted to the Archives for safe-keeping.

The film had its debut at an Elliot Weisgarber celebration at the CMC BC’s Creative Hub in Vancouver in April.  It can now be viewed on-line.  The Aki-No-Hinode manuscript is one of 450 compositions by Elliot Weisgarber included in his collection, consisting of textual records and audio recordings, held in the University Archives.

The University of British Columbia Archives recently assisted the Canadian Music Centre in British Columbia in the production of a short documentary film on the work of composer, ethnomusicologist, and UBC School of Music professor Elliot Weisgarber.

The film is part of CMC BC’s Legacy Composer Film Series, celebrating the first generation of Canadian composers to write Western concert music on the West Coast of Canada.  The films each honour one of five B.C. composers, in addition to Weisgarber:  Murray Adaskin, Barbara Pentland, Rudolf Komorous, and Jean Coulthard.  According to CMC BC, “Each of them contributed something unique, completely new and remarkable to the nation’s cultural mosaic, both through their body of work and the living legacy of students they inspired”.

The six-minute film, directed by John Bolton, is titled Aki-No-Hinode (Japanese for “Autumn Sunrise”), after one of Weisgarber’s short works for flute and piano.  Weisgarber’s daughter, Karen Suzanne Smithson, discovered the previously-unknown piece in her parents’ garage in 2002 while sorting through some of her father’s belongings looking for manuscripts to donate to the Archives.

Throughout the film, the sparse notes of Weisgarber’s composition, played on flute and piano, can be heard in the background, while the camera focusses on the manuscripts.  An emotional highlight is Smithson’s story of her discovery of the Aki-No-Hinode manuscript, and playing it “possibly for the first time”.

Aki-No-Hinode was shot in the Mackenzie Seminar Room in UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, with additional scenes showing the Automated Storage and Retrieval System (ASRS) where the Weisgarber manuscripts are stored.  Karen Smithson and archivist Erwin Wodarczak are featured.  Smithson talks about her father and his work, his fascination with Asian music, and how as a composer he was a pioneer in incorporating Asian (in particular Japanase) influences and instrumentation into Western concert music.  Wodarczak describes how archival collections are stored and can be retrieved from the ASRS.  “There’s a story behind every document, behind every collection” like Weisgarber’s, he says, and describes how gratifying it is when such collections are entrusted to the Archives for safe-keeping.

The film had its debut at an Elliot Weisgarber celebration at the CMC BC’s Creative Hub in Vancouver in April.  It can now be viewed on-line.  The Aki-No-Hinode manuscript is one of 450 compositions by Elliot Weisgarber included in his collection, consisting of textual records and audio recordings, held in the University Archives.

The University of British Columbia Archives has a new website: http://archives.library.ubc.ca/!

This is a significant milestone, for several reasons.  It is the first re-design of the Archives’ website since March 2010.  Also, it coincides with the migration of the site to UBC Library’s WordPress web platform.  Finally, the updated design is now fully consistent with the Library’s Common Look and Feel (CLF) website branding.

All of our on-line historical resources – including inventories of textual records, digitized photographs and publications, virtual displays, and general historical information about the University – are still available, as are links to our access policies and procedures, records management services, and Flickr and Twitter accounts.  A standard WordPress search tool for the website is available on every page.  News and updates can be accessed on our blog, now located at http://archives.library.ubc.ca/news/.

Links to the old website should be automatically re-directed to the appropriate part of the new site.  Please let us know about any broken links or other errors.

Thanks to Yvonne Chan for technical support and advice during the re-design.

We invite you to explore the new website at http://archives.library.ubc.ca/.

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