A new open science prize has arrived on the international scholarly community stage and is causing a positive stir among global researchers and their research teams who come from a wide breadth of disciplines and fields of study.

It is “sponsored by a collaboration among the U.K.-based Wellcome Trust, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute” and is hugely welcomed by researchers “who are develop[ing] innovative tools and services that could unleash the power of data to advance discovery and improve health around the world”.

“It’s really bringing to light the nascent ideas that researchers are thinking about, but not necessarily put out there yet,” as per Aki MacFarlane, Programme Officer in the Open Research team with Wellcome Trust. “We’ve managed to bring some awareness to lots of things going on that we as funders and public were not aware of — which is great.”

Read the full SPARC announcement here

 

First-ever Open Science Prize by the Numbers:

  • Six finalist projects from a field of 96 solutions proposed by applicants in 45 countries
  • 4,000 votes came in from 76 countries to narrow the field from six to three
  • Final winner (below) was chosen by a review committee appointed by the prize sponsors
  • Grand prize award-winning team won $230,000

 

Open Science Prize grand prize winner:

Nextstrain

An open-source project to harness the scientific and public health potential of pathogen genome data (in real time)

 

 

Other Open Science Prize finalists:

Fruit Fly Brain Observatory

An open source platform for studying fruit fly brain function, and for investigating fruit fly brain disease models that are highly relevant to the mechanisms of human neurological and psychiatric disorders

 

Open Neuroimaging Laboratory

Lowering barriers to data and tools for open collaborative science of the brain

 

MyGene2

A portal through which families with rare genetic conditions who are interested in sharing their health and genetic information can connect with other families, clinicians, and researchers

 

OpenAQ

Empower communities to end air inequality through open data (in real-time)

 

OpenTrials FDA

Enabling better access to drug approval packages submitted to and made available by the Food and Drug Administration

 

 

Why publish Open Access?

 

Discover Open UBC

 

Open Access publishing and knowledge creation support at UBC

 

 

Above image is courtesy of National Institutes of Health (NIH)

 


This exhibit takes place at IKBLC from April 1 to 28, 2017, as a collaboration between the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Community Engagement & Programs Division and the Roedde House Museum.  A re-mounting of an earlier three-part exhibit on three families called Victorian Vancouver: Family Portraits, this exhibit illustrates how migrant families in early 20th century Vancouver fostered their own sites of commerce, community, and culture.   The exhibit tells the stories of the Roedde’s and their printing business and the Lam family of Ho Sun Hing printers, the city’s first Chinese-English print shop.  This exhibit is a side-by-side story of these two early migrant family printers in Vancouver.  Ho Sun Hing Printers was Vancouver’s first Chinese-English print shop, founded by Lam family patriarch, Lam Lat Tong.

 

Image credit: The Lam Family

The shop was one of the oldest operating print businesses, with its final location in Vancouver’s historical Chinatown, closing recently in 2013 after being in business for more than a hundred years.  Although the Roedde House Museum does not house any of the Ho Sun Hing materials that were on display in 2014, this exhibit’s items are lent to the Museum by third-generation printer, Norman Lam.  Norman also graciously took the time to share his family’s story of migration to Canada, working in the print shop, and growing up in Chinatown.

The Roedde House Museum is a fully-restored and refurnished Victorian home in the West End.  Now a local hub for concerts, lectures, readings, and all sorts of community art, historical, and cultural events, the Roedde House is a “living museum” inviting guests to interact with the home and its artefacts to imagine what life was life for an upper-class migrant family at the turn of the 20th century.

Who were the Roedde’s?

Image credit: the Roedde House Museum

Gustav Roedde was one of the city’s first bookbinders and urban settlers. He was born in 1860 in Thuringen, Germany. He trained as a printer and bookbinder in Leipzig, Germany’s famed “City of Books”. In 1882 he emigrated to Ohio USA. There he met and married Matilda Cassebohm. In 1886 the couple moved to Canada and started a family and bookbinding and printing business. The house on 1415 Barclay Street was built for them in the year 1893. The Roedde home remains an important part of Vancouver History as one of the few Heritage Houses remaining and restored from a pivotal time in the beginnings in modern Vancouver.

With the growth of fast digital technology and communication today, we often take print for granted. But back in Gustav’s time, books and print were a major mode of communication. Vancouver as a settler city and colony, was able to develop businesses, industry, journalism, travel and of course, a government. It is arguable that print and book production by pioneers like Gustav, were solely responsible for the type of communication needed to grow these very sectors of the city we live in today. A new city was for migrants like Gustav, new opportunity. There was a common saying at the time to “Take it to the Roedde’s” whenever locals had printing or bookbinding needs.


This exhibit takes place April 1 to 28th, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level)


For questions, please contact the Community Engagement Librarian (Allan Cho) or Program Services Assistant (Kristen Wong)

Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC – April 5th, 2017

UBC – VPR and SPARC invite you to attend a Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC.

This is an opportunity to hear first-hand about SSHRC’s new programs and changes in eligibility.

 

WHO: Tim Wilson, Executive Director, SSHRC Research Grants and Partnerships

WHEN: 1:30-3:30pm on Wednesday 5th April, 2017

WHERE: Fred Kaiser, Room 2020/2030

 

WHY: Over its 35-year history, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) has focused on building Canada’s capacity to undertake excellent research—and, as a result, has funded Canada’s top researchers and research trainees. Because research “excellence” is an ever-evolving target, its pursuit is both an enduring commitment and a priority. As Executive Director of Research Grants and Partnerships at SSHRC, Tim Wilson is responsible for overseeing all of the Agency’s Grant programs. He will talk about SSHRC funded programs and future plans. This is especially relevant given recent changes to the Insight Grant and eligibility of health related research, and a new stream of Partnership funding.|

 

SIGN-UP here

 

Above text is courtesy of SPARC

 

John Cooper Robinson was an Anglican missionary who lived and worked in Japan in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The Cooper Robinson collection consisting of over 4,600 photographic prints, negatives, glass lantern slides, and postcards is one of the most valuable photographic records of this era.

The exhibition, Double Exposure Japan-Canada: Missionary Photographs of Meiji-Taisho Japan, on display at Rare Books and Special Collections was curated by Professor Allen Hockley and Naoko Kato, Japanese Language Librarian. The exhibit highlights four major themes: Robinson and the Economies of Japanese Photography, Robinson and the M.S.C.C. Mission in Japan, Robinson and Japanese Religions, and Robinson’s Photographic Practices. This exhibit features original photographs as well as glass lantern slides and glass negatives that were used by Robinson.

In addition, the Asian Center at UBC features a selection from The Making of History and Artifacts (1888-1926): The Photographs of John Cooper Robinson from Meiji-Taisho Japan exhibit, curated by Robert Bean with an introduction by Bill Sewell.

Check out the John Cooper Robinson Collection Finding Aid to learn more about this extensive photo collection.

Double Exposure Japan-Canada is on display at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections on the first floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre from March 13–May 31, 2017, and can be viewed Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 12-5 p.m. until April 8. The exhibition is free and open to the public. For more information, please contact Naoko Kato at naoko.kato@ubc.ca.

The Chung Collection exhibition room will be closed on Thursday, March 23, and Friday, March 24, for conservation work. Our apologies for the inconvenience, but this important work will ensure that the treasures in the Chung Collection will be available to visitors for generations to come. Thank you for your patience!

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).

 

Acknowledgement: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is pleased to contribute to the promotion of this unique opportunity.  We acknowledge the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society’s website as the source for most of this content.

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society is an enterprising non-profit organization that develops and delivers transformative education inspired by Haida Gwaii. In partnership with leading universities, we offer students immersive, experiential learning opportunities in rural, resource-dependent communities in transition. Here the Haida Nation, island communities, and provincial and federal governments are working through complex joint management models towards reconciliation and sustainability.

Drawing on Haida Gwaii’s legacy of innovation and leadership, HGHES offers a range of programming including undergraduate semesters, executive education and professional development courses, research opportunities, public lectures and workshops, and more.

The Haida Gwaii Semesters include the following areas of focus:

  1. Natural Resource Science
  2. Natural Resource Studies
  3. Reconciliation Studies
  4. Marine Planning

Please visit http://hghes.ca/haida-gwaii-semesters/ for more information, including the application process, tuition, fees and FAQs

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society embraces a place-based approach; we see the social and ecological systems of Haida Gwaii as vibrant natural classrooms for our students to engage with, grounding course content in living, local case studies. We believe in working together and facilitating a rich collaboration between academics and local knowledge holders, supporting a meaningful learning exchange and the development of a broad perspective.

  • As issues around the globe become increasingly complex, If students are from UBC, there is an agreement in place to facilitate registration.
  • For non-UBC students there is an opportunity to earn UBC credits and transfer them back to the student’s home institution.

 

Every Spring since 1981, Vancouver’s Alcuin Society holds a national competition to select the country’s most beautiful books of the previous year. The winning books tour every province in Canada, and are also exhibited at the two major book fairs in Germany, in Frankfurt and Leipzig. As well, copies are donated to the Canadian Embassy Library in Tokyo, where they are exhibited during the Tokyo International Book Fair.

 

The purpose of the competition is to motivate publishers to pay attention to the look of books, as well as to their content. In addition, the Society hopes to encourage book designers by national and international recognition of their work.

 

The books are judged by three different jurors each year – experts in their fields from all over the country, and, occasionally, from abroad. The entire book is taken into account: the cover, the choice of type, layout, white space; paper used, readibility, creativity in design; and most of all, the appropriateness of the design to the content.

 

This March, IKBLC is exhibiting the winners from last year’s competition. There are eight categories of books: from children’s books to pictorial, from poetry to reference. Some of the judges’ comments on what they liked about the books are available, and displayed near the books.

 

PDFs of the full-colour awards catalogues are available online for some of the past competition winners. In mid-March 2017, the Society’s 35th competition will take place in Vancouver, for Canada’s 2016 publications, and when it’s published, this year’s catalogue will be available online as well.

 

This exhibit takes place March 1 to 31, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level).

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