cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository, is seeking an iSchool student in the Arts Co-op Program for a position as Digital Projects Student Librarian ([F18] 19064) starting September 2018.

 

This position will involve depositing hundreds of digital objects in various formats created as part of the From the Ground Up: Buddhism and East Asian Religions SSHRC funded project ( frogbear.org ).

 

This project is well-suited to a student interested in digital asset management, open access repositories, metadata standards, and developing training materials.

 

View the detailed job posting via login at http://artscoop.ubc.ca/

 

The posting closes on May 28, 2018.

 

 

 

Due to an upgrade to the Library’s Catalogue, patrons will not be able to request materials from ASRS starting Sunday May 13, 2018 at 6 p.m. Full service is expected to resume May 19, 2018.

A recent UBC Library service bulletin has more information about the scheduled outages and their impact on the UBC Library system more broadly.

While RBSC will not be able to retrieve materials from the ASRS (any item with the location listed as RARE BOOKS & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS ASRS storage in the catalogue record), we will still be able to retrieve materials stored in the RBSC vault (any item with the location listed as RARE BOOKS & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS in the catalogue record). Materials stored in the ASRS generally include textual archival materials and contemporary books.

If you have questions about whether an item might be available, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

 

WWII Japanese Canadian lettersRare Book and Special Collections at UBC Library is thrilled to have acquired an extraordinary collection of letters that provide unique insight into the devastating effects of the Japanese Canadian internment during World War II.

The collection of 147 letters, written to donor Joan Gillis in 1942 by a group of young Japanese Canadians she met while attending Queen Elizabeth Secondary School in Surrey, talk of daily life and the challenges faced by these young people after being ordered out of the “Security Zone” on the B.C. coast, and are filled with frequent references to acute homesickness and sadness at being removed from their homes. The writers range in age from 13 to 18.

RBSC is pleased to be able to add this unique acquisition to its robust Japanese Canadian Research collection that includes materials on business and commerce, mining, farming, fishing, forestry, religious activities, education, community, reminiscences and biographies in addition to materials on the Japanese Canadian evacuation.

You can learn more about the collection of letters by reading the full press release. If you’d like to see the letters in person, feel free to visit Rare Books and Special Collections and join a tour!

 

For over a century, there has been a rather curious and unique public lecture event happening every Saturday evening at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

From its humble beginnings in 1916, the Vancouver Institute (VI) has been holding free public lectures presented by locally, nationally and internationally recognized, distinguished scholars and notable industry professionals alike from UBC and beyond.

 

Spanning several decades now, the VI lectures’ collection (made available by the UBC Library in partnership with the VI) is steadily growing in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository. This one-of-a-kind mixed collection of audio and video materials is a fine testament to the historical, scientific, technical and academic knowledge, expertise and wisdom accumulated by the VI speakers over the years.

 

The VI lectures’ collection is teeming with a wide range of scientific, archaeological and other intriguing discoveries to philosophical musings and historical biographies to politics, policies and opinions to advanced technologies in education, medicine, and just about everything else in between.

 

This treasure trove of knowledge consists of novel, creative and innovative ideas and notions to the hard-knock school of lessons learned through good (and, at times, not so good), old-fashioned trial and error. Since then, the array of topics presented by past and current VI speakers were, and still are to this day, all-engaging, funny, illuminating, candid and as inspiring as ever.

 

A round of applause is due to Green College at UBC for its administrative management of the VI lectures over the years and transferred seamlessly over to the new Global Reporting Centre on January 1, 2018.

 

Another round of applause goes to University Archives for digitizing the vast majority of the VI lectures, the individual materials are continuing to be digitized and made openly accessible in the VI lectures’ collection in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

While waiting for upcoming VI lectures, below are some past and present VI lectures to watch now online anytime and anywhere:

 

The next 50 years in engineering http://hdl.handle.net/2429/36288

 

Gold or dross — The romantic past and future potential of B.C.’s mineral wealth http://hdl.handle.net/2429/19745

 

The golden age of astronomy http://hdl.handle.net/2429/15122

 

Ecological reserves in British Columbia http://hdl.handle.net/2429/30981

 

An evening with Mary Hemingway http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20033

 

Life under the sun: The past and future of solar energy http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20760

 

Artists in medieval workshops http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20769

 

Observations and photographs http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20044

 

Virginia Woolf: a personal portrait http://hdl.handle.net/2429/34467

 

Einstein — the man and his work http://hdl.handle.net/2429/35297

 

The coinage of Athens and the ancient world http://hdl.handle.net/2429/35868

 

The mystique of the detective story http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20819

 

Byzantine archaeology: a city revealed http://hdl.handle.net/2429/34338

 

Leonard Cohen: “The only tourist in Havana” http://hdl.handle.net/2429/13026

 

Dogs and people: The history and psychology of a relationship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/32808

 

Dealing with SARS http://hdl.handle.net/2429/32104

 

Journey of the Blue Whale http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61793

 

Digital Dumping Ground : The Global Trade in Electronic Waste http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61570

 

The Human-Animal Bond : Our History With Dogs http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61571

 

Desert Dust and the World’s Environments http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61150

 

Hammering the Klavier : Beethoven’s Earthshaking and Bone-crushing Masterpiece http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62270

 

Media Ethics on the Digital Frontier http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61152

 

Bug Shells and Butterfly Wings : New Materials Inspired by Nature http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62080

 

Stroke : New Evidence on Prevention and Recovery http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62337

 

Cheap : The High Cost of Discount Culture http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62344

 

Let Them Eat Dirt : Raising Children With Their Microbes http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62338

 

Bee Time : What Can We Learn from the Demise of Bees? http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62335

 

 

Shakespeare second folioThis past spring term, Rare Books and Special Collections hosted a number of classes from a wide variety of disciplines, including English, history, art history, German studies, Asian studies, and many more. We love hosting classes, as it allows us to introduce so many more students to our amazing collections. We especially love to see the results of the students’ work with our collections and the incredible insights they bring to their topics. Now we’re very happy to share some of this great student work with you!

One of the assignments for Professor Patsy Badir’s course, “Image and Text in Seventeenth Century Literature,” was an in-depth exploration of a single book from a selection of 17th-century items here at RBSC. Students were asked to research the history of the item and introduce it to a public audience online. We have a few of these student projects to share with you and hope you enjoy them. Perhaps you will be inspired to stop by RBSC to see one of the items for yourself!

Next up: Ana Maria Fernandez Grandizo’s exploration of the second folio edition of Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies:

https://anamariafdzg.wixsite.com/ubcshakespearefolio/printing-binding

Enjoy!

Once Upon a Pop-up is on display on level 1 (RBSC reading room) and level 2 (main foyer) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre from April 11 through May 31, 2018.

Image from Wither's EmblemesThis past spring term, Rare Books and Special Collections hosted a number of classes from a wide variety of disciplines, including English, history, art history, German studies, Asian studies, and many more. We love hosting classes, as it allows us to introduce so many more students to our amazing collections. We especially love to see the results of the students’ work with our collections and the incredible insights they bring to their topics. Now we’re very happy to share some of this great student work with you!

One of the assignments for Professor Patsy Badir’s course, “Image and Text in Seventeenth Century Literature,” was an in-depth exploration of a single book from a selection of 17th-century items here at RBSC. Students were asked to research the history of the item and introduce it to a public audience online. We have a few of these student projects to share with you and hope you enjoy them. Perhaps you will be inspired to stop by RBSC to see one of the items for yourself!

First up: Aiden Tait’s exploration of George Wither’s Collection of Emblemes, Ancient and Moderne:

https://a-tait.tumblr.com/

Enjoy!

The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre will be open 24 hours a day from Monday, April 9 to Wednesday, April 25.

 

 

 

Are you a new UBC faculty member? Attend the next Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC

 

The Office of the Vice-President, Research & Innovation, and SPARC office invite you to attend a Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC.

 

Hear about the latest information and resources available regarding the SSHRC funded programs as well as its future plans.

 

SPEAKER: Tim Wilson, Executive Director, SSHRC Research Grants and Partnerships

WHEN: 2pm-3:30pm on Tuesday, April 10, 2018

WHERE: Michael Smith Labs, room 102

 

Register here

 

Above text is courtesy of SPARC

 

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to release the cIRcle Annual Impact & Activity Report 2016-2017!

 

In 2016-2017, cIRcle (UBC’s Digital Repository) had over 56,000 items. In the past two years, cIRcle has archived more than 4,000 deposits per year — an average annual growth rate of 8%.

 

Other highlights included in the report:

  • A breakdown of the increase in faculty content and a quick summary of the top content contributors
  • Developed cIRcle guidelines and practices on improving metadata for greater access and discoverability via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal
  • Featured Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum and UBC alumna, Mary-Lou Florian
  • Spotlight on a few key partnerships and collaborations such as the Vancouver Institute Lecture Series and more

 

A quick sampling of new additions to cIRcle included:

Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59683

Form follows parking : strategies for mitigating the impacts of excess parking supply http://hdl.handle.net/2429/57704

Embedding the Frames of Evidence-Based Practice : Intersections in Librarianship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58260

Research Data Management (RDM) Needs of Science and Engineering Researchers : A View from Canada http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58265

Analyzing Fire Ignition Data in the Kamloops, Lillooet and Merritt fire zones : with implications toward the effects of fire suppression on the landscape http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59241

The landscape of rare cancer : a sea of opportunity http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59312

Interventions to Improve Patient Hand Hygiene : A Systematic Review http://hdl.handle.net/2429/60520

 

And, last but not least by any means, we were thrilled to add the first fourteen items from UBC President Santa Ono and we look forward to adding more this year!

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

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