Image: Pixabay

 

What is a Research Data Centre (RDC)?

Attend Introduction to the RDC (Research Data Centre)

 

Date: April 2, 2019

Time: 2-3pm

Location: Room B25 – Computer Lab – Woodward Library

 

Register

 

 

Which citation management tool is the best for your research?

Attend Choosing the Right Citation Management Tool for Your Research (Beginner)

 

Date: April 4, 2019

Time: 12pm to 2pm

Location: Room 217 – Koerner Library

  

Register

 

 

Explore thesis/dissertation formatting tips and more

Attend Thesis Formatting: Tips, tricks, and resources

 

Date: April 8, 2019

Time: 10am to 12pm

Location: Room B25 – Computer Lab – Woodward Library

 

Register

 

 

Dig into Literature Reviews: Searching and Keeping Track

Attend Literature Reviews: Searching and Keeping Track

 

Date: April 9, 2019

Time: 11am to 1pm

Location: Room B25 – Computer Lab – Woodward Library

 

Register

 

 

cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

UBC Research Commons

 

 

 

 

 

Image courtesy: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Library

 

Last month, SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, Douglas, VCC and JIBC participated in the yearly Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week event comprised of presentations followed by a discussion about the value of “fair dealing in a modern Canadian context and highlighting the perspectives of diverse copyright stakeholders”.

 

Watch the archived event Balancing the scales: The role of fair dealing in Canada (Parts One, Two, Three and Four)

 

Explore related items in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal:

 

 

Canadian copyright legislation and archival material

 

The acquisition of literary papers in Canada

 

Building open cultures: the Commons in a digitally networked environment

 

Moral rights of authors in international copyright of the 21st century: time for consolidation?

 

Application of the right of reproduction to the internet: should browsing be considered copyright infringement?

 

Digitally archiving Hula-related objects

 

Developing countries and the international copyright regime: the neglected issue of cultural survival

 

Contested rights in cyberspace

 

UBC Library: Fall update

 

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Across Enchanted Lands: Universal Motifs in Illustrated Fairy Tales is on display from March 1 through May 30, 2019. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and people of all ages are encouraged to attend.
Reduce your UBC Library fines by donating non-perishable food items until April 1st.

Many thanks to guest blogger Claire Williams for contributing the below post! Claire is a graduate student at UBC’s iSchool (School of Library, Archival and Information Studies) and the processed the Lilian Bland fonds as part of her role as an archives and reference assistant at Rare Books and Special Collections.

Lilian Bland is widely recognized as the first women to design, construct, and fly her own aircraft. She was also an avid photographer, journalist, marks-woman, equestrian, motorist, and an early settler of Northern Vancouver Island.

Rare Books and Special Collections acquired a collection of her photographs, many of which are glass negatives and glass lantern slides, documenting her life from Europe to her home-stead in Quatsino, to California, and back again.

In addition, a copy of her autobiography was donated to RBSC providing a rare account of Bland’s experiences in her own words, documenting the course of her eventful life. Below are a few selections from the fonds, showcasing a selection of Lilian’s many feats and adventures.

Lilian the Equestrian

“As I got a name for being able to ride anything, farmers would bring me horses to try out hunting, and I applied for a license to the Jockey Club in the hope of being able to ride in races, but was refused. I think I was the first lady to apply.”

In addition to ‘riding anything’ Lilian published several articles on horses and horseback riding in Country Life Tatler, and a variety of other magazines including some in French and German. She often included her own photography in these publications, and/or photographs of her riding.

Lilian the Motorwoman

In 1925 Lillian drove her husband, her cousin, and their two children from California back to Vancouver in a Model-T ford, camping on the way.

“I had the trusty Ford in which the seats would turn into two beds, and a tent hooked on the side. A large kettle was slung behind, a roll of blankets on the mud-guard, the blue Jay in his cage, two children and the three of us, and left California for a 1,000 mile trip to Vancouver.”

Lilian had driven a Model-T in Britain which her father had purchased her as enticement to give up her airplane, which he considered much more dangerous.

Lilian the Pilot

In 1910, Lillian designed and built her plane the MayFly.

“My uncle sent me a postcard from France illustrating the monoplane and giving its dimensions. This was the final spark to my ambition to fly, something I had not tackled yet. I would make a machine and fly it!”

The Lilian Bland fonds can be viewed in the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room starting in mid-March 2019. The RBSC reading room is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

 

Check out these titles and local performances; explore the creativity of amazing artists, performers, poets, and more!

 

 

Aboriginal Music in Contemporary Canada: Echoes and Exchanges edited by Anna Hoefnagels and Beverley Diamond

 

This collection narrates a story of resistance and renewal, struggle and success, as indigenous musicians in Canada negotiate who they are and who they want to be.

It demonstrates how music is a powerful tool for articulating the social challenges faced by Aboriginal communities and an effective way to affirm indigenous strength and pride.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For upcoming shows and music series in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

Where the Blood Mixes by Kevin Loring

 

A story about loss and redemption. Caught in a shadowy pool of alcoholic pain and guilt, Floyd is a man who has lost everyone he holds most dear. Now after more than two decades, his daughter Christine returns home to confront her father. Set during the salmon run, Where the Blood Mixes takes us to the bottom of the river, to the heart of a People.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For upcoming performances written and directed by Kevin Loring!

 

 

 

 

 

Children of God: a Musical by Corey Payette 

 

A powerful musical about an Oji-Cree family whose children were taken away to a residential school in Northern Ontario. The play tells the story of one family: Tommy and Julia, who are trying to survive in the harsh environment of a religious school, and their mother, Rita, who never stops trying to get them back. The impact of this experience on the lives of them all is profound and devastating, yet the story moves toward redemption

Find me at UBC Library!

For upcoming performances written and directed by Cory Payette!

 

 

 

 

Practical Dreamers: conversations with movie artists by Mike Hoolboom

 

Welcome to the world of fringe movies. Here, artists have been busy putting queer shoulders to the wheels, or bending light to talk about First Nations rights (and making it funny, to boot), or demonstrating how a personality can be taken apart and put back together, all during a ten-minute movie which might take years to make.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For upcoming films in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

Indianland by Lesley Belleau

 

This collection of poems written from a female and Indigenous point of view and incorporate Anishinaabemowin throughout. Time is cyclical, moving from present day back to first contact and forward again. Themes of sexuality, birth, memory, and longing are explored, images of blood, plants (milkweed, yarrow, cattails), and petroglyphs reoccur, and touchstone issues in Indigenous politics are addressed.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For live performances and readings in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

The People Have Never Stopped Dancing: Native American modern dance histories by Jacqueline Shea Murphy

In this first major study of contemporary Native American dance, Jacqueline Shea Murphy shows how these concert performances are at once diverse and connected by common influences. Illustrating how Native dance enacts cultural connections to land, ancestors, and animals, as well as spiritual and political concerns, Shea Murphy challenges stereotypes and offers new ways of recognizing the agency of bodies on stage.

Find me at UBC Library!

For upcoming dance performances in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Elena Pederson, Publications & Web Services Assistant, from UBC Education Library for her work on designing our digital signage.

For those of you in rural or northern communities, or wherever you are for that matter, please note this ongoing series of podcasts.

http://ruralroutespodcasts.com/?cat=206 *

Many of these could be the starting point for community conversations held at or facilitated by local libraries.

Here are summaries of three recent episodes:

  1. Rural Media:

“Media industry is in trouble. For a long time now it has been shedding jobs and converging into ever larger corporate entities where profits outweigh any residual sense of responsibility to small communities for whom a local paper is often a necessity. Are there solutions? In this episode we will bring you interviews with journalists working a community owned paper . . .” **

  1. Islands and their universities:

“Islands are often perceived as being at a disadvantage compared to their mainland counterparts. And sure, there are some tough issues that are at least somewhat unique to islands. However, there is also plenty of evidence of the potential for unique successes, partially because island geographies necessitate doing things a little differently. Universities located on islands tend to have a different relationship with their communities, often working together to find new, appropriate ways of approaching those old island challenges. . .” **

  1. Community First Tourism Development

“Developing rural tourism is a complicated process fraught with pitfalls, but, when done right, it provides economic and social benefits to rural communities. In this episode we talk to researchers and practitioners about tourism development in Newfoundland and Labrador, Scotland, Denmark, Alberta, and BC. . .”**

*Rural Routes is a Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development and Canadian Rural Revitalization Foundation initiative.

This show is supported through a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Connection grant.

** Source: Rural Routes Podcasts © 2016

As part of the course, FREN 520: La Révolution française: histoire, fiction, débats, and in conjunction with the talk by Prof. Keith Baker (Stanford University) on Jean-Paul Marat, Rare Books and Special Collections is pleased to host a display of materials from UBC Library’s French Revolution Collection.

The display, curated by students Juliette Christie and Marilyse Turgeon-Solis and Dr. Joël Castonguay-Bélanger (Department of French, Hispanic & Italian Studies), explores the start of the French Revolution in 1789, the political power of the printing press, the Revolution as portrayed on the stage and in music of the time, and the final days of King Louis XVI. A catalogue of the exhibition is available for download. The core of UBC Library’s French Revolution Collection, a small group of 111 pamphlets, was acquired in the 1970s, but a recent collaborative acquisition effort between the Library and the Department of French, Hispanic & Italian Studies will allow the collection to grow substantially over the next five years.

The display of materials from the French Revolution will be on in the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room through February 28, 2019. The RBSC reading room is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

 

While 3MT was created by The University of Queensland in 2008, UBC was and still is one of the first universities in North America to host a 3MT competition since 2011.

 

Commencing annually in February, UBC 3MT heats get underway with winners advancing into the Semi-Finals and Finals’ rounds in March.

 

Below are the top five things to know about 2019 UBC 3MT:

 

  1. Currently, over 350 universities across 59 countries worldwide hold 3MT competitions
  2. For 2019 UBC 3MT, there are six workshops designed to help participants successfully prepare and deliver their presentations
  3. 2019 UBC 3MT prizes range from gifts (People`s choice) to $1,000 and a trip to Prince George, BC (where the finalist will represent UBC at the represent UBC at the Western Regional 3MT competition)
  4. Testimonials from past UBC 3MT finalists, semi-finalists and other honourable mentions give an insight into what it feels like to participate and deliver 3MT presentations in a memorable and engaging way
  5. UBC 3MT affords an exciting opportunity for presenters, audience members, heat organizers, sponsors, judges, and volunteers who help showcase just a small sampling of UBC research to a non-specialist audience here and beyond

 

All the best to the 2019 UBC 3MT participants and supporters in the coming months!

 

 

Browse UBC Theses and Dissertations in cIRcle via Open Collections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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