The ‘Whose 150?’ display case.

The fifth annual Aboriginal (Un)History Month exhibit is now on display at UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Across the nation June is recognized as Aboriginal History Month, but the tradition of (Un)History Month is a celebration and acknowledgement of the importance of Indigenous Peoples – not only in history – but in the present and future. This year the exhibit asks and responds to the question “Whose 150?” with eight cases from local organizations and First Nations.

WHOSE 150?

“This year, many Canadians are celebrating the 150th anniversary of Canada. For them, the development of Canada from a colony to an independent nation is the story of the emergence of a democratic nation exceptional in both its history and promise. That is, however, a history that looks very different to many Indigenous people in Canada, who view the growth of the nation of Canada and its people as a story of dispossession, repression, and hardship. Throughout this history, Indigenous people have seen all but 0.2% of the lands upon which they have lived for millennia pass from their control, and they have seen their traditional economies, governance, and ways of life destroyed or suppressed and their basic human rights restricted or denied. For much of that history, Indigenous people in Canada could not vote, form political organizations, hire lawyers, or, in some cases, leave their tiny reserves without permission. For over a hundred years, until 1996, they saw their children removed, often forcibly, from their communities and placed in residential schools designed to break their spirits and connection to their families, communities, and traditional culture, while offering them little for their future survival. Many survived horrible forms of abuse, and many died there schools, with mortality rates at times in some schools exceeding sixty percent. Today, many communities still struggle to contend with the aftermath of these systems and with their ongoing manifestations, and health and other outcomes for Indigenous people continue to be significantly worse than those for most Canadians, and yet, because until very recently, Indigenous people and history have been so invisible in Canadian education, few Canadians know or have a way to understand.

Many Indigenous communities are, however, working as they always have to survive, rebuild their resiliency, and maintain and restore the strength of their cultures, and through opportunities such as university education, long denied Indigenous people, many are finding new forms of strength. Canada is, of course, in many other ways, a great country. By truthfully and directly addressing the history and current circumstances of Indigenous people—and acting upon what we come to understand—we can work together to make Canada a country and a society we can all more fully join in celebrating.”

Introduction by Linc Kesler, Director, First Nations House of Learning

UBC is located on the traditional, ancestral, unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people.

The exhibit is open from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. on the second floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre until August 30.

Featured Cases include:

A satellite book display at the Woodward Library celebrates Aboriginal (Un)History Month

Híɫzaqv Language and Culture Mobilization Partnership

A partnership between the Heiltsuk Cultural Education Centre, the Bella Bell Community School and UBC’s First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, HLCMP creates opportunities for speaking, writing, and reading the Híɫzaqv (Heiltsuk) language. This display highlights the importance of language revitalization as a means of resilience against the legacy of colonialism.

The HLCMP case, located on the 2nd floor of Irving K. Barber.

The Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre

The IRSHDC case addresses the nation’s history of Indian Residenital Schools which imposed the forced removal of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis chidlren from their homes and families, and sought to strip them of their language and culture. The History and Dialogue Centre -set to open its doors this summer- will hold copies of the Truth and Reconciliation Commision of Canada’s records.

Maps and historical photos of Indian Residential Schools are some of the items on display.

Indigitization

The Indigitization display looks at the legacy of Indigenous cultural material embedded within cassette tapes. The program offers grants to communities and organizations to support them in their digitization efforts.

This case contains tweets, photos, and news stories relating to the Indigitization program.

Musqueam

Musqueam: our history

This case highlights Musqueam’s history and legacy through place names and sχʷəy̓em̓ (e.g. transformer stories), showing traditional and ancestral village sites and place names in conjunction with the current geography of Vancouver.

Musqueam: our teachings

This exhibit case looks at ways in which Musqueam is actively educating and trying to change public perceptions around Aboriginal history in general – specifically highlighting a project for the UBC community, and a project for K-12 educators and children.

Musqueam: c̓əsnaʔəm

c̓əsnaʔəm, located within Musqueam’s traditional and unceded territory in what is now the Marpole neighbourhood, is an important, ancient Musqueam village and burial site. This case shows replicas of ancient belongings and the process by which these replicas and were created as part of the c̓əsnaʔəm exhibit.

The Native Youth Program at the Museum of Anthropology

NYP is a summer program for urban aboriginal youth that provides training and employment for high school students. Watch and listen to two digitally animated stories interpreted and narrated by NYP members.

RBSC tours poster imageHave you ever been curious about what we do or what we have at RBSC? Join our weekly tour of Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of British Columbia Library for an introduction to our space and our unique materials and collections. Tours are free and open to the general public, as well as the UBC community. No need to RSVP, just drop in to learn what RBSC is all about!

Every Wednesday at 11 a.m.
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1st floor
1961 East Mall, UBC Vancouver campus

For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

Photo credit: Guilhem Vellut @ Flickr

 

In 2002*, UBC`s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) first opened its doors and, then in 2008, it reopened anew in the finished Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

 

Back in the day, students mainly studied at study tables with notebooks and pens or pencils. Nowadays, students are studying with the “latest computer technology, a wireless network, peer programs and community events”.

 

 

“We chose to fund the Learning Commons because

we’ve always believed that people learn best when they are engaged in discussion,

sharing ideas and insights with one another.”

Kay and Lloyd Chapman, Benefactors

 

 

Thanks to the benefactors of the CLC, Mrs. Kay Scott Chapman (1917-2012) and Dr. Lloyd Chapman (1918-2004) and Suzanne Cates Dodson (1933 – 2014) and her husband Earl D. Dodson (1928 – 2009) and thanks to the benefactor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Dr. I. K. (Irving) Barber (1923 – 2012), they enabled the UBC community of students, faculty/staff and countless others to enjoy a wide variety of UBC events.

 

Great examples include local and international conferences, lectures and workshops, one-of-a-kind exhibits, special visits from national and international dignitaries to various royal visits over the years.

 

Explore more History of the Chapman Learning Commons

 

Read this article about “how UBC’s work is grounded in student development theory and cuts across traditional unit-based structures to be truly collaborative”

 

Delve into the Digital Tattoo Project and its “focus on supporting learners to make informed choices and extend their digital capabilities around online practices, safety and identity”

 

Peer into how student involvement makes for student success at UBC and beyond

 

Watch a recent video send-off by the CLC student team reflecting on their recent Learning Commons’ experiences!

_______________________________________________________________________________

Correction on May 20, 2017:

In 2002* (not 2012), UBC`s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) first opened its doors and, then in 2008, it reopened anew in the finished Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

The Chung Collection exhibition room will be closed on Tuesday, May 23 for conservation work. Our apologies for the inconvenience, but this important work will ensure that the treasures in the Chung Collection will be available to visitors for generations to come. The Chung Collection exhibition room will be open as usual on Wednesday, May 24. Thank you for your patience!

Since 2013, the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre has been a funding partner with the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) and the Network of Inquiry and Innovation (NOII). Through this partnership, the Learning Centre has supported teachers working with aboriginal students transitioning to further education. Read more about it here.

The 2017/18 Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) call for community submissions is now open.

The deadline is Friday, June 16, 2017.

Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) is a collaborative approach to building on the capacities of rural, remote and Northern British Columbian communities. LIRN BC is listed as a project of the BC Rural Network, established in 2004.

The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is proud to partner through LIRN BC with government and non-government organizations to provide and facilitate workshops to promote community learning and collaboration in rural and northern communities.

LIRN BC can bring trainers and facilitators to your community to deliver a learning event for residents.

The annual call for “Expressions of Interest” (EOI) occurs May and June each year.  It includes summaries for roughly 25 workshops offered by LIRN BC partner organizations (including an option to “build your own topic”).

In responding to the call for EOIs, applicants are asked to tell us about your community and its challenges, and identify up to three workshop topics that will help your community move forward. If your agency is selected, you will be contacted by a LIRN BC partner who will work with you to design and deliver a learning event that meets the needs of your community. Successful applicants would be expected to provide publicity support, venue and refreshments.

Click here to download the Expressions of Interest document.

The current LIRN BC partners are:

  • Association of Neighbourhood Houses BC (ANHBC)
  • BC Centre for Employment Excellence
  • BC Healthy Communities (PlanH Program)
  • UBC Library, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
  • Leave Out Violence (LOVE) Society of BC
  • PeerNetBC
  • SPARC BC
  • Vantage Point
  • Volunteer BC
  • YouthCo

For further information please contact jsands@sparc.bc.ca.

 

 

This year, two acclaimed UBC researchers are among a select few distinguished recipients who are being honoured for their lifetime achievements. Congratulations to both of them!

 

“[My] research focusses on pictorial representation and perception;

the aesthetic and epistemic value of pictures, including scientific images;

theories of art and its value; the ontology of art; computer art and new art forms;

and aesthetic value, wherever it may be found.”

– Dr. Dominic McIver Lopes, Humanities, University of British Columbia

 

One of the six Killam Research Fellow recipients is Dr. Dominic McIver Lopes, a UBC scholar and professor, who is “one of the foremost contemporary philosophers of art” whose “work focuses on the nature and significance of art and the aesthetic”.  While he previously was a Guggenheim Fellow, a fellow of the National Humanities Center as well as a Leverhulme Visiting Research Professor at the University of Warwick, he also held other visiting positions in Florida, Japan, Italy, and France. He has also won two other teaching awards, the Philosophical Quarterly Essay Prize and the American Society for Aesthetics Outstanding Monograph Prize.

Learn more about Dr. Lopes here

 

 

“If anything helped me to move forward in my career,

it was the curiosity to look behind every open door.”

– Dr. Julio Montaner, Health Sciences, University of British Columbia

 

Among the five scholars receiving the Killam Prize this year is Dr. Julio Montaner, a UBC physician, scientist, and advocate, who provides leadership in the international HIV/AIDS research community. He was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada-The Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences (RSC) and the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in 2015 and has received many awards and recognition during his lifelong career including these notable ones: the Canadian Institutes of Health’s Knowledge Translation Award, Prix Galien Award, Albert Einstein World of Science Award, and The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for contributions to the field of HIV/AIDS, to name just a few.

Find research by Dr. Montaner here

 

 

About The Killam Program:

  • Generously funded by Mrs. Dorothy J. Killam in memory of her husband, Izaak Walton Killam, the Killam awards make up part of the Killam Trusts
  • Established in 1967, the Killam Research Fellowships were created and, in 1981, the Killam Prizes were inaugurated
  • The Killam trusts “fund scholarship and research at four Canadian universities, a neurological research and clinical institute and the Canada Council”
  • Approximate value of the Killam Trusts is $425 million with a Canada Council portion of $55 million

 

About the Killam Prizes:

  • Recognizing outstanding Canadian scholars and scientists in industry, government agencies or universities for their pioneer work in the advancement of research
  • Five annual prizes of $100,000 are awarded (1 prize each in the fields of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, and engineering)

 

Learn about UBC Killam Awards and Fellowships here

 

 

Explore more UBC research awards here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Killam Trusts

 

Date: May 1 – 31, 2017
Location: UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2 Foyer (1961 East Mall) (map)
Hours: same as the IKBLC building hours (see hours)

This exhibition honours the special significance that written forms hold across the many unique cultures of Asia – a vast geographical area boasting an enormous diversity of languages and writing systems.

Each case features rare texts and diverse forms of bookmaking that highlight the prominent role of writing and calligraphy found across Asia. Encompassing Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Farsi, Tibetan, Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Gujarati scripts, the works invite you to explore a range of cultural or sacred practices that find expression in the written word. These works provide a glimpse of the ingenious ways in which Asian writers have blurred the boundaries between the textual and the visual realms, creatively deploying script to communicate deeper layers of meaning that go beyond words themselves. All of the extraordinary texts on display belong to the collections of the UBC’s Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections.

This satellite exhibit is co-curated by April Liu (Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, Asia, MOA) and Fuyubi Nakamura (MOA Curator, Asia), in collaboration with the UBC’s Asian Library and UBC Rare Books and Special Collections. It is held in conjunction with Traces of Words: Art and Calligraphy from Asia, a larger exhibit on view at the Museum of Anthropology, from May 11 to October 9, 2017.

 

 

 

 

A new open science prize has arrived on the international scholarly community stage and is causing a positive stir among global researchers and their research teams who come from a wide breadth of disciplines and fields of study.

It is “sponsored by a collaboration among the U.K.-based Wellcome Trust, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute” and is hugely welcomed by researchers “who are develop[ing] innovative tools and services that could unleash the power of data to advance discovery and improve health around the world”.

“It’s really bringing to light the nascent ideas that researchers are thinking about, but not necessarily put out there yet,” as per Aki MacFarlane, Programme Officer in the Open Research team with Wellcome Trust. “We’ve managed to bring some awareness to lots of things going on that we as funders and public were not aware of — which is great.”

Read the full SPARC announcement here

 

First-ever Open Science Prize by the Numbers:

  • Six finalist projects from a field of 96 solutions proposed by applicants in 45 countries
  • 4,000 votes came in from 76 countries to narrow the field from six to three
  • Final winner (below) was chosen by a review committee appointed by the prize sponsors
  • Grand prize award-winning team won $230,000

 

Open Science Prize grand prize winner:

Nextstrain

An open-source project to harness the scientific and public health potential of pathogen genome data (in real time)

 

 

Other Open Science Prize finalists:

Fruit Fly Brain Observatory

An open source platform for studying fruit fly brain function, and for investigating fruit fly brain disease models that are highly relevant to the mechanisms of human neurological and psychiatric disorders

 

Open Neuroimaging Laboratory

Lowering barriers to data and tools for open collaborative science of the brain

 

MyGene2

A portal through which families with rare genetic conditions who are interested in sharing their health and genetic information can connect with other families, clinicians, and researchers

 

OpenAQ

Empower communities to end air inequality through open data (in real-time)

 

OpenTrials FDA

Enabling better access to drug approval packages submitted to and made available by the Food and Drug Administration

 

 

Why publish Open Access?

 

Discover Open UBC

 

Open Access publishing and knowledge creation support at UBC

 

 

Above image is courtesy of National Institutes of Health (NIH)

 

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