The University Archives has launched a new on-line resource: an annotated list of First Nations-related historical resources held in the Archives.

This is an overview of resources maintained by the Archives which may be relevant to research on First Nations history and contemporary issues. It includes references to relevant materials in our various collections and links to information presented on our website. These are cited as documenting First Nations history and culture in general, and the evolution of UBC’s relationships with First Nations in particular. They include archival materials in all media (textual, photographic, audiovisual, and digital), websites, and Internet-based collections and related resources.

The focus of this compilation is on research materials held in the University Archives. Researchers are advised to consult with staff in other Library branches, such as Rare Books and Special Collections and Xwi7xwa Library, regarding materials in their collections.

This list is not intended to be fully comprehensive, but will serve as an introduction for researchers. Patrons researching specific individuals, groups, or events may find information in other collections and resources maintained by the Archives but not listed here. Archives staff are available to suggest other avenues of research and otherwise provide assistance.

Thanks to Ann Doyle and her colleagues at Xwi7xwa Library for their guidance in compiling this list.

The University Archives has launched a new on-line resource: an annotated list of First Nations-related historical resources held in the Archives.

This is an overview of resources maintained by the Archives which may be relevant to research on First Nations history and contemporary issues. It includes references to relevant materials in our various collections and links to information presented on our website. These are cited as documenting First Nations history and culture in general, and the evolution of UBC’s relationships with First Nations in particular. They include archival materials in all media (textual, photographic, audiovisual, and digital), websites, and Internet-based collections and related resources.

The focus of this compilation is on research materials held in the University Archives. Researchers are advised to consult with staff in other Library branches, such as Rare Books and Special Collections and Xwi7xwa Library, regarding materials in their collections.

This list is not intended to be fully comprehensive, but will serve as an introduction for researchers. Patrons researching specific individuals, groups, or events may find information in other collections and resources maintained by the Archives but not listed here. Archives staff are available to suggest other avenues of research and otherwise provide assistance.

Thanks to Ann Doyle and her colleagues at Xwi7xwa Library for their guidance in compiling this list.

This year the University of British Columbia marks the 100th anniversary of its opening for classes and research in 1915. To help commemorate the centennial, the University Archives has undertaken several social media initiatives utilizing its extensive historical collections. The most recent such project has been to set up an account on the photo-sharing social media site Flickr.

The Flickr account for UBC Archives was established in February 2015 to promote both the centennial and the University Archives’ historical resources by featuring a selection of photographs from our collections. The “ubcarchives” photostream features those images that we feel best document various facets of UBC’s history, including student life, prominent administrators and faculty, the built environment, important events, and the University’s relationship with the broader community.

Selected photographs are uploaded as high-resolution scanned digital images in either TIF or JPEG format. Metadata for each image are derived from the textual descriptions of each image presented in our existing UBC Archives Photograph Collection. Each image is “tagged” with UBC-related subject headings, such as “Main_Mall”, “Basketball”, and “Graduation”. Those images showing a recognizable geographic location are linked to the Flickr “Map” feature. The entire Flickr collection is organized into “Albums” based on broad categories such as “Students”, “World War I”, and “First Nations”.

Our photostream is not intended as a replacement for our existing on-line digital photograph collection, hosted by UBC Library’s Digital Collections. In that database, more than 40,000 digitized images and associated metadata are administered in-house as part of a very rich collection of digitized resources unique to the University. Our Flickr account is primarily intended to showcase the best of our photographic holdings and promote the University’s centennial year to the world-wide Flickr audience.

The ubcarchives photostream was launched with 100 images. In the coming months we will continue to add more images that we feel effectively document the history of our University.

This year the University of British Columbia marks the 100th anniversary of its opening for classes and research in 1915. To help commemorate the centennial, the University Archives has undertaken several social media initiatives utilizing its extensive historical collections. The most recent such project has been to set up an account on the photo-sharing social media site Flickr.

The Flickr account for UBC Archives was established in February 2015 to promote both the centennial and the University Archives’ historical resources by featuring a selection of photographs from our collections. The “ubcarchives” photostream features those images that we feel best document various facets of UBC’s history, including student life, prominent administrators and faculty, the built environment, important events, and the University’s relationship with the broader community.

Selected photographs are uploaded as high-resolution scanned digital images in either TIF or JPEG format. Metadata for each image are derived from the textual descriptions of each image presented in our existing UBC Archives Photograph Collection. Each image is “tagged” with UBC-related subject headings, such as “Main_Mall”, “Basketball”, and “Graduation”. Those images showing a recognizable geographic location are linked to the Flickr “Map” feature. The entire Flickr collection is organized into “Albums” based on broad categories such as “Students”, “World War I”, and “First Nations”.

Our photostream is not intended as a replacement for our existing on-line digital photograph collection, hosted by UBC Library’s Digital Collections. In that database, more than 40,000 digitized images and associated metadata are administered in-house as part of a very rich collection of digitized resources unique to the University. Our Flickr account is primarily intended to showcase the best of our photographic holdings and promote the University’s centennial year to the world-wide Flickr audience.

The ubcarchives photostream was launched with 100 images. In the coming months we will continue to add more images that we feel effectively document the history of our University.

Just before the grandstand of the old stadium at the University of British Columbia was torn down in 1968, a collection of old scrapbooks of uncertain origin was rescued from a storage room. Fortunately, instead of being thrown in the trash, they were recognized as valuable historical artifacts and sent to the Library. The scrapbooks eventually became part of the collections of the University Archives.

Based on the book plates and bindings, it appears that many of these bound volumes were made by G.A. Roedde Ltd. – which represents another link to Vancouver’s history, as Roedde was the city’s first bookbinder. Their contents document the origins and early history of UBC, from 1890 to 1941: mostly newspaper clippings from Vancouver-area newspapers, regarding University issues, student activities, and special events. Some scrapbooks also include photographs, souvenir programmes, and other memorabilia.

Newspapers represented by the clippings in the scrapbooks include the Vancouver Sun, the Province, the Daily News-Advertiser, the Vancouver Daily World, the Vancouver Star, and the New Westminster Columbian. They include both articles and letters-to-the-editor, so they document both the history of UBC and the evolution of public opinion about the University.

The volumes were originally scanned in 2006 as black-and-white PDF images. In 2013, work-study student Shyla Seller was assigned to re-scan the volumes at higher resolution and in colour. Those not yet completed are marked as [BW].

The scrapbooks were compiled by several individuals over the years. Volume #1 was compiled by F.C. Wade, an early supporter of the University. Volume #3, which due to its unusual formatting has not been digitized, was presumably either compiled by UBC President Frank Wesbrook or presented to him at some point.

For many years the origins of the other scrapbooks were unknown. However, during the 2013 re-scanning project Shyla discovered a reference to William Tansley as being the compiler of many of them. An article pasted in page 90 of Volume #22 identifies him as “Custodian of the Clippings”. Tansley was originally the University custodian and groundskeeper, and later curator of the University Museum, the predecessor of the UBC Museum of Anthropology. Based on that article, and from the handwriting in the scrapbooks, it appears that he was responsible for at least Volumes #19-26, and continued to maintain and compile them until his retirement in 1941. An additional volume, numbered 27, was not among the scrapbooks discovered in the old stadium. Originally included among the Tansley papers in the University Archives, it was recently identified as being part of the collection and is now available in digital form for the first time.

Volume numbers, dates, and other title information included in the list are mostly based on the inscriptions on the covers of the original books.

(This is another in an occasional series of introductory guides to UBC Archives’ collections and services)

Another resource for researchers maintained on the University Archives’ website is the Buildings & Grounds page.

Listed at the top is an index to UBC’s buildings, dating from 1911 to the present-day. It is presented in both chronological and alphabetical form, and includes facilities on both the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses.  Each entry (for example, that of the Chemistry Building) includes information on the building’s location, date(s) of construction, architect(s), cost, history, architectural features, and other points of interest.  Also included are the published and archival sources used to compile those facts, and which researchers are recommended to consult for further information.

Also included on the page are links to images of buildings and facilities from our digitized photograph collections; lists of campus trees and graduating class tree plantings; how persons or organizations are commemorated at UBC through the naming of buildings and facilities; links to selected campus plans; virtual displays related to campus facilities; and other sources of information on the University’s physical development.  Also of interest are two articles, originally published in professional journals and now available on-line: one on the original architectural proposals for the Point Grey campus, and the other on the neighbouring residential area of University Hill.

Anybody conducting research on the built environment of the University would do well to begin by consulting with these resources.

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