Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Don Erhardt

 

Situated on the UBC Vancouver campus, the Asia Pacific Dispute Resolution (APDR) Project is comprised of a network of colleagues not just from UBC but also from partner institutions in North America and Asia. The APDR Project supports research, analysis and policy proposals on cross-cultural dispute resolution in the areas of trade and human rights, with particular attention to Canada, China, India, Indonesia and Japan.

 

Known as an MCRI (Major Collaborative Research Initiatives) project, it is “a flagship-funding program within the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)” whose principal investigator is Dr. Pitman Potter, a professor at UBC’s Allard School of Law. He has ‘published several books such as Assessing Treaty Performance in China: Trade and Human Rights (Vancouver and Toronto: UBC Press, 2014) and The Legal System of the People’s Republic of China (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2013) and over 100 articles and essays’.

 

With the last part of this multi-year project falling into place, the dissemination of the multiple findings are now underway as each country and its research team of representatives prepare to release their publications. These much-anticipated publications are arranged around the following key ‘topics in which the research findings have been grouped for dissemination – development, good governance, health, labour and poverty/inequality – with these volumes which include papers from members of the different research teams’. They also added, “The number of publications from the project, as can be expected from a project in its last stage, is quite vast and varied in types. At the moment, we are updating the inventory of publications and they are being classified according to five main types: book, book chapter, journal article, policy report and miscellaneous (media and other types of publications)”.

 

So while the APDR Project was ‘granted funding before May of 2015, the new policy on Open Access released by SSHRC last year is not mandatory, the stakeholders are aware [that] this is something the agency is encouraging for all [of] its projects’.

 

Download the APDR Working Papers Series‘ items now (see directly below) and stay tuned for more new items coming soon!

 

APDR Working Papers Series’ items:

Learning Networks as a Tool for Good Governance: The Case of the Canada-China Forum on Industrial Relations and Employment Standards

Introduction: Labour and Human Rights

AIDS, Human Rights, and Public Security in China

Public Health and Drug Policing in Malaysia: Using Empirical Evidence for Advocacy

Four Suggestions on Establishing a Legal Environment for a Speedy Transformation of the Economic Development Model

An Analysis of the Social and Legal Problems in Transitional China

Inclusive Workplace Practice in Canada: Competing Inequalities in an Industrial-Mobile Society

 

Photo courtesy: Pixabay

 

It is a pleasure to announce the arrival of a new item recently added to cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository resulting from the collaborative efforts between a world-renowned scholar and several of UBC’s academic research units and community partners – School of Music, Hong Kong Studies Initiative, Centre for Chinese Research, Museum of Anthropology, and St. John’s College.

 

Nancy Yunhwa Rao is an Associate Director of Academic Studies who is both the Head of the Composition Program and the Head of the Music Theory Program of the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. As “one of the leading scholars in Chinese American music studies”, she has amassed award-winning research which focuses on the “musical history of Chinese in the United States, Canada, and Cuba” which she “mined [from] immigration files” and so forth.

 

Examples of her published research are found in a variety of journal publications such as the “Cambridge Opera Journal, Journal of the Society for American Music, Journal of 19th Century Music Review, as well as several collections of essays”. Interestingly, she has published ‘a book on Chinatown Opera Theater in North America via the University Illinois Press’ which is completely filled with the “analysis of playbills, performing networks, opera arias, stage spectacles, and more”.

 

Watch Parts One and Two of her talk here

 

Explore the Chinese Special Collections‘ Library Research Guide

 

 

 

Image: cIRcle Graduate Non-Thesis Research Submission Workflow Overview

 

The GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a lottery based award held twice a year for graduate students at UBC Vancouver which went live on July 9, 2012.

Graduate students were eligible to submit exemplary non-thesis manuscripts or projects related to graduate coursework to the GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award, with approval from their course instructors.

A random selection was made from items submitted to cIRcle during the previous 6 month period – four awards will be made per annum, two in April and two in October.

The GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a five-year (2012-2017) collaboration of the Graduate Student Society and cIRcle/UBC Library.

The first two awards were presented on October 18, 2012 and the last few awards were presented before the Award ended on May 1, 2017.

Congratulations to the 2016 & 2017 Award winners – Victor Ngo and Ali Hosseini* (April 2016); Jean-Paul Andre Joseph Benoit and Amy Myring (October 2016); and, Keilee Mok and Alejandra Echeverri** (April 2017)!

* Note: Co-authors are faculty members and were not eligible for the award.
** Note: Co authors had graduated prior to the award period and were, therefore, ineligible.

 

Over the course of its five-year term, the Award was presented to the randomly-selected UBC graduate students for their exemplary non-thesis research work in either traditional and/or interdisciplinary fields of study:

  • Civil Engineering
  • Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies (CENES)
  • Community and Regional Planning (SCARP)
  • Computer Science
  • Educational Studies
  • Forest Resources Management
  • Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS)
  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Theatre and Film

“I am grateful for the efforts of those responsible for cIRcle

because I see it as a positive alternative that facilitates sharing of research and work.

cIRcle catalyzes the sharing and building of ideas, motivating students to

improve their work and to give back to the research community that provides so much for them.”

 

    – Robert DeAbreu, GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award Winner, April 2013

 

While the Award officially ended on 1 May 2017, the Award collection was aptly renamed and became the new UBC Graduate Research collection in cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository which now incorporates exemplary non-thesis research work from UBC Okanagan graduate students too. Hooray!

 

The UBC Graduate Research collection welcomes exemplary graduate student non-thesis research such as the following:

  • Essays or papers
  • Graduating papers or projects (Capstone, etc.)
  • Manuscripts
  • Presentations (including research posters)
  • Publisher-permitted versions of journal articles, conference papers, etc. based on course-related research
  • Software code
  • Technical reports
  • Video and audio based projects

 

With too many benefits to list, below are just a sampling of such when making your UBC graduate student non-thesis research openly accessible via cIRcle:

  • Create/enhance your academic and professional scholarly profile
  • Track views and downloads from cities and countries around the world
  • Openly disseminate your UBC research with scholars locally and globally
  • Your work is regularly indexed by web search engines (Google, Google Scholar, etc.)
  • Preserve your UBC scholarly legacy with a DOI (persistent link)

 

UBC graduate students are encouraged to upload their own work (subject to course instructor or supervisor approval) to the UBC Graduate Research collection anytime.

 

 

 

 

 

There is excitement among researchers both nationally and internationally on the recent U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ statement. Why? It focuses on sustainable publishing.

 

As a collaborative body of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities, the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ works to “foster the development and delivery of long-term, sustainable higher education and research policy, in Canada and around the world”.  These Canadian universities are “home to world-class researchers using state-of-the-art research infrastructure to make ground-breaking discoveries” as they “train tomorrow’s citizens, entrepreneurs and leaders, and work with partners from the public, private and government sectors to mobilize knowledge and capitalize on it”.

 

The message by Suzanne Corbeil, U15 Executive Director, states in part that “[w]e know investing in research and science pays dividends for all Canadians. It spurs innovation and fosters the curiosity and creativity that our best and brightest minds direct towards solving society’s greatest challenges. It also enables us to ensure we are developing the best and brightest talent for the workforce of tomorrow, and are able to conduct research in world-class facilities that can drive growth of innovative companies.“

 

In its preamble, the U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing emphasizes that, “Access to research and scholarly outputs is essential for scientific discovery, innovation, and education. To maximize knowledge transfer and impact, our researchers’ work must be made readily available around the globe. Research-intensive universities also require timely and continuing access to international research results and scholarship in order to advance and disseminate knowledge, and to develop the next generation of researchers.”

 

The five key principles and their highlights found in the U15 statement are briefly listed directly below:

 

  1. Open Access – a necessity for an accessible and sustainable model of scholarly publishing
  2. Public Interest – disseminating scholarly publications and other research outputs as widely as possible
  3. Quality – rigorous peer review processes and effective research impact measures in all forms of academic publishing
  4. Accountability – highest possible proportion of public dollars invested in research and education
  5. Innovation – collaborative development of new models of scholarly communications benefit the academy and the public in the digital age

 

Download the full U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing here

 

Explore Open Access and more at UBC

 

Browse UBC’s digital repository for research and teaching materials

 

 

Above logo is courtesy of U15

 

Photo: Susan Parker Don Liebig / UCLA Photography

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

UBC appoints new University Librarian – Susan E. Parker

“Being named University Librarian at UBC is an honour, and the highlight of my career,” says Susan Parker. “I look forward to partnering with UBC’s excellent library staff, students, and faculty as we continue to develop and deliver outstanding services, scholarly resource collections, and welcoming library facilities for the UBC community.”

Read the full announcement here

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Compute Canada & CARL-Portage – Beta Testing of FRDR

Check out the new research management tool by The Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR). ‘A joint initiative led by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) and Compute Canada provid[ing] Canadian researchers a place to deposit large data sets and to improve the discovery of Canadian research data’.

Visit the FRDR beta testing site

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OA journals & Canadian universities

Canadian Universities Support Publication in and the Launching of Open Access Journals

“As Open Access journals gain in recognition across scholarly communities, Canadian universities voice increasingly vocal support for Open Access journals…”

Continue reading here

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New Research Data Centre opens at UNBC

Why are the graduate students and approved researchers smiling? It definitely has something to do with the new University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) Research Data Centre.

Learn more about UNBC’s Research Data Centre

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Increase the Impact

Beyond the Beyond: Can we Increase the Impact and Reach of Scholarly Research?

From stakeholders to voters, many folks are in need of greater access and transparency when it comes to research and research outcomes.  As noted by Vicky Williams, “with increasing funder mandates for research to demonstrate broader impact – on society, policy, the economy, or the environment – research has to reach a broader audience.”

Continue reading here

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OA in the Humanities

Why Is Open Access Moving So Slowly In The Humanities? By Peter Suber

While OA has made strides over the years via open access repositories (in physics) and open access journals (in biomedicine), Peter Suber provides some insight on the “nine differences between the humanities and the sciences”.

Read the first and second of his blog posts from the new series on Open Access in the Humanities” by Blog of the APA (The American Philosophical Association)

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Upcoming OA/OE Conferences

 

 

OpenCon 2017 in Berlin, Germany

OpenCon affords a unique opportunity for “students and early career academic professionals from across the world” to learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data” as well as to “develop critical skills, and catalyze action toward a more open system for sharing the world’s information—from scholarly and scientific research, to educational materials, to digital research data”.

 

OE Global 2018 in Delft, the Netherlands

The Open Education (OE) Global Conference is an “internationally diverse [one] devoted exclusively to open education, attracting researchers, practitioners, policy makers, educators and students from more than 35 countries to discuss and explore how Open Education advances educational practices around the world”.

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New BCcampus Annual Review

BCcampus 2016/17 Annual Review

Highlights of faculty and instructor partnerships and projects on the future of post-secondary learning and teaching in British Columbia

Read the review here

 

 

UBC Library Communications team behind the 2016 Open Access Awareness campaign. Designer Jasmine Devonshire, Photographer and Videographer Clare Yow, Director Becky Potvin and Strategist Michelle Blackwell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UBC Library is the first academic library to be selected as the Gold winner for the 2017 CPRS Digital Communications campaign of the year for their Open Access Awareness campaign.

The campus-wide campaign, that launched in the Fall of 2016 aimed to foster awareness and enhance student understanding around the Open Access movement and the open resources available through the Library. The campaign resulted in a significant increase in web traffic to the Library’s Open Access resources, major gains in year-over-year social media engagement and a successful launch event.

“We spent a lot of time understanding our student audience and determining the best ways to connect them with tools they need at a critical point in their academic careers,” said Michelle Blackwell Communications & Marketing strategist. “It is very gratifying to see that we made an impact.”

Celebrated annually, the CPRS Awards showcase Canada’s best public relations and communications projects and campaigns and was hosted in Kelowna, B.C.

“Thanks to CPRS for this recognition,” said Becky Potvin, Director of Communications for UBC Library, “the campaign was executed by a four-person team on a shoestring budget and was created in collaboration with our librarians and colleagues at the Centre for Teaching and Learning. It was successful in helping to raise the library’s profile and connect students with important research tools. We are very proud.”

Open Access Week 2016

 

A new open science prize has arrived on the international scholarly community stage and is causing a positive stir among global researchers and their research teams who come from a wide breadth of disciplines and fields of study.

It is “sponsored by a collaboration among the U.K.-based Wellcome Trust, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute” and is hugely welcomed by researchers “who are develop[ing] innovative tools and services that could unleash the power of data to advance discovery and improve health around the world”.

“It’s really bringing to light the nascent ideas that researchers are thinking about, but not necessarily put out there yet,” as per Aki MacFarlane, Programme Officer in the Open Research team with Wellcome Trust. “We’ve managed to bring some awareness to lots of things going on that we as funders and public were not aware of — which is great.”

Read the full SPARC announcement here

 

First-ever Open Science Prize by the Numbers:

  • Six finalist projects from a field of 96 solutions proposed by applicants in 45 countries
  • 4,000 votes came in from 76 countries to narrow the field from six to three
  • Final winner (below) was chosen by a review committee appointed by the prize sponsors
  • Grand prize award-winning team won $230,000

 

Open Science Prize grand prize winner:

Nextstrain

An open-source project to harness the scientific and public health potential of pathogen genome data (in real time)

 

 

Other Open Science Prize finalists:

Fruit Fly Brain Observatory

An open source platform for studying fruit fly brain function, and for investigating fruit fly brain disease models that are highly relevant to the mechanisms of human neurological and psychiatric disorders

 

Open Neuroimaging Laboratory

Lowering barriers to data and tools for open collaborative science of the brain

 

MyGene2

A portal through which families with rare genetic conditions who are interested in sharing their health and genetic information can connect with other families, clinicians, and researchers

 

OpenAQ

Empower communities to end air inequality through open data (in real-time)

 

OpenTrials FDA

Enabling better access to drug approval packages submitted to and made available by the Food and Drug Administration

 

 

Why publish Open Access?

 

Discover Open UBC

 

Open Access publishing and knowledge creation support at UBC

 

 

Above image is courtesy of National Institutes of Health (NIH)

 

 

Open Education Week is a celebration of the global Open Education Movement. Its goal is to raise awareness about the movement and its impact on teaching and learning worldwide. Attend one of the many Open Education events at UBC and UBC Library throughout March. 

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons    

Date & Location: March 18 at the Belkin Art Gallery

Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Date & Location: March 19 at the Western Front Society

Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Sign up to participate.

 

Open Scholarly Practice

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning.

Date & Location: March 27, Irving K Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Time: 12 to 1:30 p.m.

Register for the event.

 

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

 Join us to explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education. We’ll tackle such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Date & Location: March 28, Harbour Centre, Simon Fraser University, Room 1430

Time: 5:30 to 8 :45 p.m.

Register for the event.

 

[citation needed] – Librarians Improving Wikipedia

Date & Location: March 30, Terrace Lounge, iSchool, 4th Floor IKBLC

12:30 to 2:00 p.m.

Join us in celebration of Open Education Week for “Librarians Improving Wikipedia.” For an hour we will work together to add reliable citations to Wikipedia articles. Come for as long as you can. Light snacks will be available.

Register for the event.

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