UBC Librarians Recommend Part 2

From the latest adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel Emma to author Liu Cixn’s classic Three-Body Problem, this is the second instalment in a series of recommendations from UBC librarians and library staff. Find your next novel, film or documentary in UBC Library’s online collections.

Independent learning

Independent Learning graphic

Stephanie Savage, Scholarly Communications and Copyright Librarian, has been preoccupied with thoughts about the economy and capitalism in recent months. “As a result, I have been reading books about class, wealth and consumerism,” she says. Stephanie recommends My life with things: the consumer diaries by Elizabeth Chin: “My Life with Things is a meditation on the author’s relationship with consumer goods and highlights the cultural value and significance of possessions and consumption.”

“Sociologist Rachel Sherman’s Uneasy street: the anxieties of affluence is a revealing and fascinating look at how today’s elite view their wealth and place in society,” Stephanie shares.

Kimberly Fama, Reference Librarian at David Lam Library, has been finding motivation in Angela Duckworth’s book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. “This book offers invaluable lessons using anecdotes, scientific evidence and personal stories that will make you realize that hard work and perseverance can play a bigger role in achieving success rather than just having natural talent,” Kim explains.

Classics and adaptations

Classics and adaptations

“Recently I watched Emma, the 2020 adaptation of the classic Jane Austen novel. This latest version is so fun and beautifully shot,” said Savage. “The Library recently subscribed to Audio Cine Films, an online database of Hollywood and international feature films. Because I am spending most of my time at home I have had a lot of opportunity to take advantage of this new resource.”

Allan Cho, Research Commons Librarian, suggests a classic in China for almost two decades, Three-Body Problem by author Liu Cixin. “First of the three-book trilogy gained immediate acclaim in 2014 in North America when it was nominated for the Nebula Award for the best works of science fiction or fantasy,” Allan shares.

“C.C. Tsai (Tsai Chih Chung)’s illustrated versions of Chinese classics are always my favorite,” shares Phoebe Chow, Program Services Assistant at the Asian Library. “His wonderful drawings brilliantly capture the spirit of the difficult original text. The Way of Nature collected stories written by Zhuangzi, a pivotal figure in Classical Philosophical Daoism. These thought-provoking stories talk about how human beings live with nature and what the basics of nurturing life are.”

Documentaries

Documentaries graphics

If you’re interested in documentaries, Phoebe has also been spending her time watching Free Solo, a film about the first person to free solo climb Yosemite’s 3,000 feet high El Capitan Wall, and Forever, Chinatown, a James Q. Chan film.

Forever, Chinatown reminds me to cherish the present moment and people around you. The world is ever-changing, but memories can be long-lasting. Sometimes they are even prettier. Highly recommend!” says Phoebe.

Looking for more recommendations? UBC librarians and library staff are here to help.

Recommendations by UBC Librarians

In light of this challenging time, we have compiled recommendations from a handful of UBC librarians for you to watch, read and listen from home. The resources can all be found in UBC Library’s online collections.

National Film Board picks

UBC Library NFB Campus recommendations

UBC Library’s National Film Board (NFB) Campus is a favourite film archive of Evan Thornberry, GIS Librarian at Koerner Library, and Sara Ellis, Art Librarian at the Music, Art and Architecture Library. “One of the most genuinely Canadian films I found was Helicopter Canada,” says Evan, reminiscing about his move to Canada, “For those of you who want to go back in time to 1966 and take a narrated flight across Canada, this is your movie”.

On April 22, Sara celebrated National Canadian Film Day by travelling back in time through a series of short films from NFB Campus. Her favourites include: Begone Dull Care (1949), Neighbours (1952), Lines Horizontal (1962) and Flamenco at 5:15 (1983).

Indigenous literature and film

UBC Library Indigenous literature and film recommendations

Sara Ellis, Art Librarian recommends Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer (2013), “It is just as easy to immerse yourself in chapters on eating wild strawberries and leeks, as it is to read about how lichen grows on rocks or how estuaries can be restored to support the return of wild salmon populations,” she says.

Karleen Lyle-Delaurier, Information Services Librarian at Xwi7xwa Library, is also taking this time to explore Indigenous history through Daniel Heath Justice’s Why Indigenous Literatures Matter. “This book gave me a chance to explore history, identity, place, sexuality, time and so much more through the author’s articulation of how these concepts relate to Indigenous literature,” she says.

Rhymes for young ghouls / Les Films Seville present a Prospector Films production; a Jeff Barnaby Film, is serious as it should be given the topics it touches on, but leaves room for humour and love and I finally get to see an Indigenous female lead,” shares Karleen.

Family-friendly picks

UBC Library family-friendly recommendations

“If you are a Totoro fan, you might enjoy Mirai of the Future, “ says Tomoko Kitayama Yen, Japanese Language Librarian at Asian Library, “The reason why I loved the famous animated film, Our Neighbor Totoro, was I so enjoyed the little girl, Mei. This film features a four-year old boy, and is supposed to have described the child extremely well. I haven’t watched this yet, but I will very soon!”

From outdoor science experiments to infographics of the solar system and picture books, Wendy Traas, Acting head of the Education Library, shares three of her favourite family-bonding resources:

Looking for more recommendations? UBC Librarians are here to help.

Why are online formats important for library users? How does the library identify the needs of our users and acquire e-resources to meet them?

UBC Library has a collection of over 8 million e-resources that are available to the UBC community. Whether you’re on your phone or on your desktop, on campus or out doing field work, the Library ensures that e-resources are available.

Take a sneak peek into our process and learn about why UBC Library’s e-resources collection is increasing and how electronic resources work is constantly changing.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

To learn more about our Strategic Framework, click here.

Experience history at the tip of your pencil crayons and celebrate #ColorOurCollections week with UBC Library's 'Maps and Landscapes' themed digital colouring book series.

 

Photo courtesy: Pixabay

 

Emerging as a two-year pilot project in 2007/8 under the auspices of the University of British Columbia’s Library, cIRcle began and remains the University’s digital repository for scholarly research and teaching materials created by the UBC community, its partners and affiliates.

 

Ranking highly among its North American peers and nabbing 1st, 2nd and 3rd places over the years, cIRcle was bestowed with such honours by the Ranking Web of Repositories (an initiative of the Cybermetrics Lab) under the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) – the largest public research body in Spain.

 

Travelling back in time to 2013, catch some memorable comments about cIRcle by two UBC professors, Dirk van Zyl from the Department of Mining Engineering and Dwayne Tannant from the School of Engineering plus those from past GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award winners – Sam Bailey, Shona Robinson and Christian Brady.

 

Now fast-forward to 2014 to check out some cIRcle highlights about finding ‘a permanent home’ for the “Intellectual Muscle – The Talks” project sponsored by VANOC, UBC Continuing Studies and The Globe and Mail; archiving a case study funded by SSHRC that captures Vancouver’s 1914 history of cinemagoing and compares it with Winnipeg-Seattle and with Toronto-Montreal; and, preserving the Rheumatology Newsletters’ collection which features the “outreach pediatric services offered via traveling clinics throughout BC“ (two of the clinics founded by UBC graduates of the pediatric rheumatology training program – Dr. K. Gross in Penticton and Dr. R. Bolaria in Victoria).

 

Journeying on through to 2015, cIRcle received a DSpace software upgrade (from version 3.1 to 5.1); started ingesting the BioMedical Central (BMC) Reviewed UBC Faculty journal articles via the SWORD (Simple Web-service Offering Repository Deposit) protocol; welcomed and added several conference proceedings, webcasts and speaker slide presentations from the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering’s 5th International/11th Construction Specialty Conference (ISCS15), the Digital Library Federation (DLF) Forum 2015 (which made its historical debut in Canada that year), Open UBC 2015, The Seventh International Conference on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development (EEDS15) and the 12th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering (ICASP12) and more.

 

Moving along to 2016, cIRcle welcomed new 2015/16 papers and presentations from the British Columbia Mine Reclamation Symposia as well as the Investigating Our Practices and Workshop for Instruction in Library Use (WILU) conferences. Examples of the UBC community, its partners and affiliates who contributed new items to cIRcle that year included various UBC departments, institutes and schools – Educational Studies (EDST), Community and Regional Planning (SCARP), Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, History, Nursing, Social Work, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES), Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Civil Engineering, Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA), Curriculum and Pedagogy (EDCP), and the UBC Library. And last (but not least), the first undergraduate, peer- and faculty-reviewed sociology publication in North America, Sojourners, was welcomed in cIRcle!

 

Advancing on through to 2017, cIRcle was thrilled to archive the first round of UBC President Ono’s speeches and writings in 2017; a growth in items found in the UBC Faculty Research and Publications collection shows that it grew from 3,600 items in total for 2017 to 5,704 items in total as of today for 2019!

 

Traversing over into 2017-2018, cIRcle achieved another milestone of containing more than 60,000 items in the repository and saw an increase of its annual growth rate up from 8% in previous years to 10%. In 2018, an historical UBC milestone was attained when UBC President and Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Santa Ono, delivered a Statement of Apology on behalf of UBC concerning its role in the residential school system. Hundreds attended the live event that was held and recorded on April 9, 2018 at the long-awaited opening of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre (IRSHDC).

 

Without cIRcle missing a beat in 2018-2019, some new and ongoing cIRcle partnerships included the Database of Religious History entries, Transnational Business Governance Interactions (TBGI) Working Papers, audio and video recordings of the Vancouver Institute Lectures, a mix of textual and other media content of the From the Ground Up: Buddhism & East Asian Religions, the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) Graduating Projects, and the UBC Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies’ Ziegler Series of video lecture recordings, to name just a few.

 

Today, it is a great pleasure to see that there are more than 69,700 items in cIRcle (and counting!). So, during this hectic time of year, take some time to sit and relax with a treasure trove of scholarly research and teaching materials on offer from cIRcle, UBC’s digital open access repository!

 

Featured cIRcle Projects:

Database of Religious History (DRH)

From the Ground Up: Buddhism and East Asian Religions (FROGBEAR) Project

Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi)

Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (PWIAS)

Portage White Papers

Punjabi Oral History Project

School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) Graduating Projects

SEEDS Sustainability Program Reports

Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

Transnational Business Governance Interactions (TBGI) Working Papers)

World Sanskrit Conference (WSC) 2018

Read about the cIRcle Projects for more details

 

Browse cIRcle in the Library’s Open Collections portal

UBC Theses and Dissertations

Conferences & Events

Faculty Research and Publications

Graduate Research

Undergraduate Research

UBC Community and Partners

 

 

Experience history at the tip of your pencil crayons with our new 'Maps and Landscapes' themed digital colouring book series.

The Historical Children’s Literature Collection contains more than 80 images of variations on classic children’s tales. Made possible by a UBC Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) grant, this collection is a collaboration with the Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections, UBC’s iSchool, and the Department of English Language and Literatures.

Particularly strong in chapbooks and early Canadian content, most of the selected books come from the Arkley Collection of Early and Historical Children’s Literature. The Arkley Collection, donated in 1976 by Stan T. Arkley, a member of UBC’s class of 1925, and his wife, Rose, comprises more than 12,000 Canadian, British, and American children’s books, serials, and manuscripts. The digitized collection contains only a small portion of the entire Arkley Collection, with potential for future growth. Among the chapbooks — small booklets containing stories or ballads aimed at the popular market and sold on the street by itinerant pedlars or “chapmen”— are a number of stories that many readers will recognize.

The first of these two versions of the Cinderella tale includes an “historical description of the cat”, for anyone who is otherwise unfamiliar with such exotic creatures.

The history of Cinderella, [1840]

Adventures of the beautiful little maid Cinderilla; or, the history of a glass slipper : to which is added, an historical description of the cat, [1825?]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also represented are somewhat lesser-known stories – such as this cautionary tale on the dangers of trying to please everyone …

Old man and his ass, [1840]

… and this collection of anecdotes where haggis regrettably appears but once.

The Scotch Haggis; a selection of choice bon mots, Irish blunders, repartees, anecdotes, &c, [between 1840 and 1857?]

In addition to children’s tales, the collection also contains instructional materials such as this 1885 speller.

Old aunt Elspa’s spelling, [1885]

To view these items and other treasures in the collection, please visit the Historical Children’s Literature Collection.

 

 

It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2018-2019!

 

In 2018-2019, cIRcle continued its focus on increasing faculty content with over 1,000 new items added – that’s a 9.6% increase from last year.

 

Examples of some new and ongoing cIRcle partnerships include the following: Database of Religious History (DRH) entries, Transnational Business Governance Interactions (TBGI) Working Papers, audio and video recordings of the Vancouver Institute Lectures, a mix of textual and other media content of the From the Ground Up: Buddhism & East Asian Religions, School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) Graduating Projects, and the UBC Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies’ Ziegler Series of video lecture recordings.

 

Another cIRcle highlight is the newly automated ingest stream of faculty content published by Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) via the SWORD (Simple Web-Service Offering Repository Deposit) protocol as well as cIRcle’s collaborative work in enhancing metadata and digital preservation with Artefactual and Atmire.

 

Discover UBC research in cIRcle – from preprints and postprints of journal articles to conference proceedings to departmental publications and technical reports to lecture/course notes, and much more.

 

Learn more about cIRcle

 

 

 

 

News Release from CANARIE: 

 

CANARIE, a vital component of Canada’s digital research infrastructure ecosystem supporting research, education and innovation, today announced $2M in funding to support the Canadian Association of Research Libraries’ (CARL) Portage Network. CARL Portage is a national, library-based research data management (RDM) network that fosters initiatives to build capacity and to coordinate activities in research data management.

The ability to manage and reuse research data helps accelerate discovery, allows for reproducibility of scientific results, and maximizes return on investment of research funding. Research data management best practices help ensure the accessibility and protection of data during the research lifecycle and beyond, and help meet growing requirements of research ethics and reproducibility, along with evolving funder policies. This funding broadens the functionality of current Portage services and tools and adds capacity to national RDM resources.

 

Read the full press release

 

Quick facts about CANAIRE:

 

  • 31,000 – Length in KM of CANARIE’s coast-to-coast ultra-high-speed research and education network
  • Nearly 170 – higher education institutions currently participating in the Canadian Access Federation (CAF)
  • 46 – percent by which traffic on the CANARIE network has been growing over the past ten years

 

About Research Data Management (RDM) at UBC

 

Explore RDM tems in Open Collections

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

 

 

The 17th World Sanskrit Conference logo

The 17th World Sanskrit Conference logo

 

 

 

Convened under the auspices of the International Association of Sanskrit Studies, the triennial World Sanskrit Conference is the premier international forum for professional researchers and educators of the Sanskrit language and its literatures, and of the history, religion, and cultures of pre-modern South Asia.

 

Attracting 600+ delegates from across the globe, the 17th WSC was held in Vancouver, Canada from July 9-13, 2018 and was the first time that this prestigious event was held in Canada.

 

Within cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository, this online collection houses the Proceedings of the 17th WSC including selected full-length papers from the 500 presentations approved for inclusion in the conference programme by the WSC2018 Academic Advisory Board. The papers within certain Sections were subject to formal peer review. Note: Papers will continue to be released on a rolling basis.

 

cIRcle is thrilled to have made these 17th WSC proceedings openly accessible via the Library’s Open Collections digital collection portal and looks forward to preserving them over the long-term for scholarly researchers and beyond for many years to come.

 

Browse the WSC2018 collection

 

Visit the WSC2018 website

 

Learn more about cIRcle

 

 

 

 

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