Check out these titles and local performances; explore the creativity of amazing artists, performers, poets, and more!

 

 

Aboriginal Music in Contemporary Canada: Echoes and Exchanges edited by Anna Hoefnagels and Beverley Diamond

 

This collection narrates a story of resistance and renewal, struggle and success, as indigenous musicians in Canada negotiate who they are and who they want to be.

It demonstrates how music is a powerful tool for articulating the social challenges faced by Aboriginal communities and an effective way to affirm indigenous strength and pride.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For upcoming shows and music series in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

Where the Blood Mixes by Kevin Loring

 

A story about loss and redemption. Caught in a shadowy pool of alcoholic pain and guilt, Floyd is a man who has lost everyone he holds most dear. Now after more than two decades, his daughter Christine returns home to confront her father. Set during the salmon run, Where the Blood Mixes takes us to the bottom of the river, to the heart of a People.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For upcoming performances written and directed by Kevin Loring!

 

 

 

 

 

Children of God: a Musical by Corey Payette 

 

A powerful musical about an Oji-Cree family whose children were taken away to a residential school in Northern Ontario. The play tells the story of one family: Tommy and Julia, who are trying to survive in the harsh environment of a religious school, and their mother, Rita, who never stops trying to get them back. The impact of this experience on the lives of them all is profound and devastating, yet the story moves toward redemption

Find me at UBC Library!

For upcoming performances written and directed by Cory Payette!

 

 

 

 

Practical Dreamers: conversations with movie artists by Mike Hoolboom

 

Welcome to the world of fringe movies. Here, artists have been busy putting queer shoulders to the wheels, or bending light to talk about First Nations rights (and making it funny, to boot), or demonstrating how a personality can be taken apart and put back together, all during a ten-minute movie which might take years to make.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For upcoming films in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

Indianland by Lesley Belleau

 

This collection of poems written from a female and Indigenous point of view and incorporate Anishinaabemowin throughout. Time is cyclical, moving from present day back to first contact and forward again. Themes of sexuality, birth, memory, and longing are explored, images of blood, plants (milkweed, yarrow, cattails), and petroglyphs reoccur, and touchstone issues in Indigenous politics are addressed.

Find me at UBC Library! 

For live performances and readings in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

The People Have Never Stopped Dancing: Native American modern dance histories by Jacqueline Shea Murphy

In this first major study of contemporary Native American dance, Jacqueline Shea Murphy shows how these concert performances are at once diverse and connected by common influences. Illustrating how Native dance enacts cultural connections to land, ancestors, and animals, as well as spiritual and political concerns, Shea Murphy challenges stereotypes and offers new ways of recognizing the agency of bodies on stage.

Find me at UBC Library!

For upcoming dance performances in the lower mainland! 

 

 

 

 

 

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Elena Pederson, Publications & Web Services Assistant, from UBC Education Library for her work on designing our digital signage.

poetry-emailPoetryPlease! Tiffany Stone and Robert Heidbreder, two well-known BC children’s poets whose published works include Rainbow Shoes (Kirkus starred review), Floyd the Flamingo and His Flock of Friends, Black and Bittern Was Night (Publishers Weekly starred review) and Crocodiles Play, will take you on a poetic ride. You will listen to poetry, act it out, read it, write your own poems and discover some criteria for choosing and writing poetry with your class.

We will also have a repeat of last year’s extra fun activity—Speed Dating for Lovers  . . .  of books.

Friday November 22, 2013 at the University Golf Club 8:00 am – 12:00 pm. Includes a continental breakfast. Co-sponsored by CWILL.

Early Bird Rates until October 31 Members $40 Non-Members $55 Students $20

To register online or by mail visit our website www.vclr.ca.

Note: these are member-only events. Don’t miss out. Please make sure your membership is up-to-date.

jonArno-_horizontal-email (4)UBC’s Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program

Presents: A talk and reading from his work by Canadian poet for children and young adults

 JonArno Lawson

Entitled:

A Talk from the Bottom of the Box: Reflections of an Award-winning Poet for Youth

Wednesday, September 25th, 2013, 12:00 – 1:00 pm

The Dodson Room, Room 302, Level 3, Chapman Learning Commons, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall, University of British Columbia

Refreshments served

JonArno Lawson, one of Canada’s most noted poets for children and young adults, will discuss his creative and publishing process and read from his books. Lawson is the author of books for all ages, from collections of poetry for teens to single-poem picture books and non-fiction.

His most recent books are Down in the Bottom of the Bottom of the Box and Enjoy it While it Hurts. In 2013 he won the PRISM non-fiction award for a piece he wrote called Horse Camp.

He is a two-time winner of the prestigious award for children’s poetry, The Lion and the Unicorn Award for Excellence in North American Poetry. The 2009 jury stated that his award-winning A Voweller’s Bestiary, From Aardvark to Guineafowl (And H) is “not just this year’s best book of children’s poetry, it is one of the year’s best books of poetry period.”

The 2007 jury stated that Lawson’s Black Stars in a White Night Sky is a “beautifully designed book filled with well-crafted poems…. Lawson is in a class by himself.”

Lawson’s young adult poetry collection, Think Again was shortlisted for the 2011 Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children’s Book Award.

Lawson has taught children’s poetry in the Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program at Simmons College, Boston, and gives workshops for children and adults.

The colloquium is sponsored by the UBC Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program, a multidisciplinary degree Program offered by the Creative Writing Program, the English Department, and the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies in the Faculty of Arts; and the Department of Language and Literacy Education in the Faculty of Education.

To read more about this and other fabulous upcoming children’s literature events go to www.vclr.ca


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre as part of the Robson Reading Series.

“In this fluid collection we enter a galactic expanse where absence, distance and fire repel and attract love-bodies in a winged-whirl of magnetic mad flight. Loss, emptiness, space, desire, blood, memory; all devour themselves in the combustions of love without self. The you/other may be interchangeable, never static or frozen or attainable. In these sharp-beaked bird-worlds there is “no going back” – at best, bodies meet only “flame to flame,” mutable and razor-like in feathery, impermanent forms. I find Hunter’s new work a rare melding of Blues, Kabbalah, and personal transcendence– a piercing, hard-won angelic love mantra. A blazing tour de force!”
- Juan Felipe Herrera, California Poet Laureate

“What lies here are the vagaries of a heart wounded, shattered, and redeemed by love. Such generosity of spirit deserves acclaim. A bravura work.”
- Richard Wagamese, author of Indian Horse”

Biography

Al Hunter is an Anishinaabe writer who has published poetry in books and journals around the world, taught extensively, and performed internationally, including, at the International Poetry Festival of Medellin. A member of Rainy River First Nations and former chief, Hunter has expertise in land claims negotiations, and is a longstanding activist on behalf of indigenous rights and wellness, and environmental responsibility. Hunter lives in Manitou Rapids, Rainy River First Nations in Ontario.

Al is also the founder and president of Good Life for Young Peoples


Select Books Available at UBC Library

Hunter, Al. (2001) Spirit Horses. Wiarton, Ont: Kegedonce Press. Link: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=2556621


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Studies

First Nations

Literature Reviews



Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre as part of the Robson Reading Series.

Andrew Kaufman’s Born Weird tells the tale of the Weird family who have always been a little off, but not one of them ever suspected that they’d been cursed by their grandmother, Annie Weird. Now Annie is dying and she has one last request: for her far-flung grandchildren to assemble in her hospital room so that at the moment of her death, she can lift these blessings-turned-curses. What follows is a quest like no other, tearing up highways and racing through airports, from a sketchy Winnipeg nursing home to the small island kingdom of Upliffta, from the family’s crumbling ancestral Toronto mansion to a motel called Love.

The title of Camille Martin’s latest book of poetry, Looms, signifies the weaving tool as well as the shadowing appearance of something, These “woven tales” were inspired by Barbara Guest’s statement that a tale “doesn’t tell the truth about itself; it tells us what it dreams about.” The strands of their surreal allegories converse, one idea giving rise to another, and the paths of their dialogue become the fabric of the narrative. In a second meaning, something that looms remains in a state of imminent arrival. Such are these tales, like parables with infinitely deferred lessons.

In Barry Webster‘s latest novel, The Lava in My Bones, a frustrated Canadian geologist studying global warming becomes obsessed with eating rocks after embarking on his first same-sex relationship in Europe. Back home, his young sister is a high-school girl who suddenly starts to ooze honey through her pores, an affliction that attracts hordes of bees as well as her male classmates but ultimately turns her into a social pariah. Meanwhile, their obsessive Pentecostal mother repeatedly calls on the Holy Spirit to rid her family of demons. The siblings are reunited on a ship bound for Europe where they hope to start a new life, but are unaware that their disguised mother is also on board and plotting to win back their souls, with the help of the Virgin Mary.”

Author Biographies

Andrew Kaufman is the author of All My Friends Are SuperheroesThe Tiny Wife, and The Waterproof Bible. He was born in Wingham, Ontario, the birthplace of Alice Munro, making him the second-best writer from a town of 3000. His work has been published in 11 countries and translated into 9 languages. He is also an accomplished screenwriter and lives in Toronto.

Camille Martin is the author four collections of poetry: Looms (Shearsman Books), SonnetsCodes of Public Sleep, and Sesame Kiosk. A chapbook, If Leaf, Then Arpeggio, was recently released from Above/Ground Press. She has presented and published her work internationally. Martin earned an MFA in Poetry from the University of New Orleans and a PhD in English from Louisiana State University.

Barry Webster‘s first book, The Sound of All Flesh (Porcupine’s Quill), won the ReLit Award for best short-story collection in 2005. He has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award, the CBC-Quebec Prize, and the Hugh MacLennan Award. Originally from Toronto, he currently lives in East Montreal.


Select Books Available at UBC Library

Kaufman, Andrew. (2013). Born Weird. Toronto, Ont: Random House Canada. Link: http://webcat1.library.ubc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=6524543

Martin, Camille. (2012). Looms. Bristol, UK:  Shearsman Books. Link: http://webcat2.library.ubc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=6309169

Webster, Barry. (2012). The Lava In My Bones. Vancouver, BC: Arsenal Pulp Press. Link: http://webcat2.library.ubc.ca/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=6435737


UBC Library Research Guides

Canadian Studies

Book, Theatre, and Film Reviews

Literature Reviews

The Theme for the Third World Poetry Canada International Peace Festival is Inspire Peace! world poetry logo

Created by Ariadne Sawyer and Alejandro Mujica-Olea in 1997, the World Poetry Society is built upon respect, honor, support, peace and love for all. With a focus on recognizing multicultural and multilingual poets and writers, the society promotes its mandate through the power of arts and education. This is the Third Annual World Poetry Canada International Peace Festival. All events are free and open to the public. Please register at www.worldpoetry.ca and bring a poem on peace, a story about peace, a song, or a dance! Space is limited for all events, so please register early!

The Festival will feature:
1. International guests, local poetry groups, community partners, dancers, musicians, filmmakers and multimedia.
2. Display tables, Poetic Necklace display at Ike’s Art Gallery April 4th – 30th.
3. Extra event: World Poetry Youth Peace Poetathon World Wide.
4. The World Poetry Canada International Month, April 4th – 30th with our partner the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.
5. World Poetry National Poetry Month Peace Display plus the display cases in the IKBLC foyer, April 4th – 30th
6. Gift poems!


Event Program:
April 4th, 7pm – 9pm, Grand Opening in the Peace River Room(Room 261) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

  • First Nations Welcome by Godwin Barton
  • World Poetry Peace E-Anthology launch
  • Music by Rio Samay Band and performance by the Jasmine Dancers
  • Empowerment Awards
  • World Poetry Exclusive: “Silence,” a short documentary by Afghan filmmaker Sharif Saedi

 

April 11th, 7pm – 9pm in the Lillooet Room (Room 301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

  • Cross Country Tour of Penn Kemp’s Jack Layton, Art in Action; bring a story or read from the Jack Layton book
  • Poetry readings by local poets
  • International guests include Michael Kwaku Somuah and Kwame Yirenkyi

 

April 20th, 1pm – 4pm in the Lillooet Room (Room 301) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

  • First Nations welcome by Wanda John-Kehewin and poetry launch of “In the Dog House
  • Navaho flute music by Angelo Moroni
  • World Poetry Peace Poetathon official launch
  • Music release by Japanese composer Yoshifumi Sakura
  • World Poetry Exclusive: “The Broken Destiny of Poetry,” an Afghan documentary by Rahmat Haidari and Sajia Hussain
  • Music and poetry readings

 

ANDREW KAUFMAN, CAMILLE MARTIN and BARRY WEBSTER

at the Robson Reading Series

Thursday, March 14, 2013, 7pm

UBC Bookstore at Robson Square

Robson Reading Series events are free and open to the public but registration is recommended. To register for this event, please click here.

Photo credit Lee Towndrow

Born Weird (Random House of Canada) tells the tale of the Weird family who have always been a little off, but not one of them ever suspected that they’d been cursed by their grandmother.

At the moment of the births of her five grandchildren Annie Weird gave each one a special power. Richard, the oldest, always keeps safe; Abba always has hope; Lucy is never lost and Kent can beat anyone in a fight. As for Angie, she always forgives, instantly. But over the years these so-called blessings ended up ruining their lives.

Now Annie is dying and she has one last task for Angie: gather her far-flung brothers and sisters and assemble them in her grandmother’s hospital room so that at the moment of her death, she can lift these blessings-turned-curses. And Angie has just two weeks to do it.

What follows is a quest like no other, tearing up highways and racing through airports, from a sketchy Winnipeg nursing home to the small island kingdom of Upliffta, from the family’s crumbling ancestral Toronto mansion to a motel called Love. And there is also the search for the answer to the greatest family mystery of all: what really happened to their father, whose maroon Maserati was fished out of a lake so many years ago?

Andrew Kaufman is the author of All My Friends Are SuperheroesThe Tiny Wife, and The Waterproof Bible. He was born in Wingham, Ontario, the birthplace of Alice Munro, making him the second-best writer from a town of 3000. His work has been published in 11 countries and translated into 9 languages. He is also an accomplished screenwriter and lives in Toronto with his wife and their 2 children.
.

LOOMS CAMILLE MARTINThe title of Looms signifies the weaving tool as well as the shadowing appearance of something, These “woven tales” were inspired by Barbara Guest’s statement that a tale “doesn’t tell the truth about itself; it tells us what it dreams about.” The strands of their surreal allegories converse, one idea giving rise to another, and the paths of their dialogue become the fabric of the narrative. In a second meaning, something that looms remains in a state of imminent arrival. Such are these tales, like parables with infinitely deferred lessons.

Camille Martin is the author four collections of poetry: Looms (Shearsman Books), SonnetsCodes of Public Sleep, and Sesame Kiosk (out of print). A chapbook, If Leaf, Then Arpeggio, was recently released from Above/Ground Press.

She has presented and published her work internationally. One of her current poetry projects is “Blueshift Road.” She’s also working on “The Evangeline Papers,” a poetic sequence based on her Acadian/Cajun heritage and her participation in archaeological digs at an eighteenth-century village in Nova Scotia, where her finds included ancestral pipes and wine bottles. Martin earned an MFA in Poetry from the University of New Orleans and a PhD in English from Louisiana State University.

BarryWebster_creditMaximeTremblay

Photo credit Maxime Tremblay

Lava In My BonesIn Barry Webster‘s latest novel, The Lava in My Bones (Arsenal Pulp Press), a frustrated Canadian geologist studying global warming becomes obsessed with eating rocks after embarking on his first same-sex relationship in Europe. Back home, his young sister is a high-school girl who suddenly starts to ooze honey through her pores, an affliction that attracts hordes of bees as well as her male classmates but ultimately turns her into a social pariah. Meanwhile, their obsessive Pentecostal mother repeatedly calls on the Holy Spirit to rid her family of demons. The siblings are reunited on a ship bound for Europe where they hope to start a new life, but are unaware that their disguised mother is also on board and plotting to win back their souls, with the help of the Virgin Mary.

Told in a lush baroque prose, this intense, extravagant magic-realist novel combines elements of fairy tales, horror movies, and romances to create a comic, hallucinatory celebration of excess and sensuality.

Barry Webster‘s first book, The Sound of All Flesh (Porcupine’s Quill), won the ReLit Award for best short-story collection in 2005. He has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award, the CBC-Quebec Prize, and the Hugh MacLennan Award. Originally from Toronto, he currently lives in East Montreal.

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