UBC Library’s Rare Books & Special Collections has acquired the first item ever printed in the city of Vancouver. The first edition of The Vancouver Weekly Herald and North Pacific News was published on Friday, January 15, 1886.

Printed in seven columns, the front page of the newspaper contains many local advertisements, histories of the Granville and Vancouver townsites, reportage of the meeting of locals to draft a request for incorporation and a column entitled “The Chinese Question”. According to research to date, it is the only surviving copy.

Its publisher, Richard H. Alexander, was an Overlander who came to British Columbia in 1862 and was active in various enterprises, including working at and managing Hastings Mill in the 1870s. He later occupied many influential positions in Vancouver business and politics.

“We’re thrilled to be acquiring this item,” says Katherine Kalsbeek, Head, Rare Books & Special Collections, “One of our core mandates is to collect and preserve materials that directly relate to the history of British Columbia. We are committed to developing this core component of our collection.”

The item was acquired through a private seller and will be added to the Library’s Chung Collection, a collection of archival documents, photographs, books and artifacts related to three broad themes: British Columbia History, Immigration and Settlement and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.  “Because of the content in some of the articles, this item would be a welcome addition to our Chung Collection” adds Kalsbeek.

The newspaper, which is just beginning to separate along its edges and has slight mottling and staining, can be viewed in person by booking a tour of UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections. 

 View the digitized newspaper in our Open Collections.

 

 

UBC Library Communications team behind the 2016 Open Access Awareness campaign. Designer Jasmine Devonshire, Photographer and Videographer Clare Yow, Director Becky Potvin and Strategist Michelle Blackwell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UBC Library is the first academic library to be selected as the Gold winner for the 2017 CPRS Digital Communications campaign of the year for their Open Access Awareness campaign.

The campus-wide campaign, that launched in the Fall of 2016 aimed to foster awareness and enhance student understanding around the Open Access movement and the open resources available through the Library. The campaign resulted in a significant increase in web traffic to the Library’s Open Access resources, major gains in year-over-year social media engagement and a successful launch event.

“We spent a lot of time understanding our student audience and determining the best ways to connect them with tools they need at a critical point in their academic careers,” said Michelle Blackwell Communications & Marketing strategist. “It is very gratifying to see that we made an impact.”

Celebrated annually, the CPRS Awards showcase Canada’s best public relations and communications projects and campaigns and was hosted in Kelowna, B.C.

“Thanks to CPRS for this recognition,” said Becky Potvin, Director of Communications for UBC Library, “the campaign was executed by a four-person team on a shoestring budget and was created in collaboration with our librarians and colleagues at the Centre for Teaching and Learning. It was successful in helping to raise the library’s profile and connect students with important research tools. We are very proud.”

Open Access Week 2016

 

Arthur J. Ray has won the Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia for his book Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History. The $1,000 prize, given by UBC Library and the Pacific BookWorld News Society, will be awarded at UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in June.

Published by McGill-Queen’s University Press, Ray’s book is a masterfully-written examination of land claims litigation between indigenous peoples and the settler societies of the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa that powerfully demonstrates the important role proceedings in British Columbia played in events of global significance.

“This book is the outgrowth of my involvement in aboriginal claims in Canada as an expert on the historical geography of the economies of First Nations and Metis communities,” says Dr. Ray, “Beginning with my participation in Delgamuukw v. The Attorney General of British Columbia (1997), l became interested in the ways extant case law and scholarship influenced claims research and, in turn, how the latter research advanced aboriginal rights law and scholarship about aboriginal people.”

“We are thrilled that this year’s Basil Stuart-Stubbs prize has been awarded to a book written by a UBC faculty member,” says Melody Burton, UBC’s Interim University Librarian. 

Arthur J. Ray is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia and has served as the co-editor of the Canadian Historical Review from 2003 to 2006. He is the author of several other books including Telling it to the Judge, An Illustrated History of Canada’s Native People and Bounty and Benevolence.

Shortlisted titles for the award include:

At Sea with the Marine Birds of the Raincoast by Caroline Fox (Rocky Mountain Books)

and

Yakuglas’ Legacy: The Art and Times of Charlie James by Ronald W. Hawker (University of Toronto Press).

The Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Book on British Columbia, sponsored by UBC Library and the Pacific BookWorld News Society, recognizes the best scholarly book published by a Canadian author on a B.C. subject. The award was established in memory of Basil Stuart-Stubbs, a bibliophile, scholar and librarian who passed away in 2012.Stuart-Stubbs’s many accomplishments included serving as the University Librarian at UBC Library and as the Director of UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. Stuart-Stubbs had a leadership role in many national and regional library and publishing activities. During his exceptional career, he took particular interest in the production and distribution of Canadian books, and was associated with several initiatives beneficial to authors and their readers, and to Canadian publishing.

Mary-Lou Florian, one of Canada's most esteemed conservation scientists makes her most recent book available through UBC's Open Collections.

 

Mary-Lou Florian, Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum, recipient of the 125th Commemorative Medal from the Governor-General of Canada and UBC alumna has made her new book, Comparative Anatomy of Branches, Roots and Wood of Some North American Dicotyledonous and Coniferous Trees and Woody Shrubs Used in Ethnographic Artifacts: Identification and Conservation Concerns available through UBC’s cIRcle Digital Repository.

After retiring in 1991 from her position as Chief of Conservation Services for the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, Florian has devoted her time to research and writing – publishing several books related to the conservation of museum objects. 

Keen to make her research more widely available, Florian approached UBC Library to make her new book available through its Open Collections. “I thank the University of British Columbia cIRcle Digital Repository for accepting my book. I am incredibly pleased the information will be available for anyone interested. An author could not wish anything more,” she said.

A comparative anatomy of tissues that were used historically in making ethnographic and archaeological artifacts, Florian hopes the book will be useful as a lab manual for teaching and reference for research, not only for ethnographic reasons, but also for many aspects of plant anatomy and identification and forestry.

“We are thrilled to provide open access to Mary-Lou’s latest book,” said Amber Saundry, Digital Repository Librarian at UBC Library, “In a short amount of time, we’ve seen strong use and interest in its specialized and unique information from conservators, curators, researchers and educators. We look forward to welcoming her future work to UBC Library via cIRcle and Open Collections“.

There is much excitement in the conservation community about the new-found accessibility of Florian’s research, “This book will be extremely useful for conservators and other collections professionals working with baskets, bark and other ethnographic materials,” says Eric Pourchot, Institutional Advancement Director at the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation, “Thank you for making her research available.” 

Anne Lama, UBC’s Library Conservator is thrilled to have access to Florian’s new book, especially after encountering Florian’s research so often during her studies in the restoration of books and paper and preventive conservation at the University Paris-Sorbonne as well as her work at the National Archives in Paris. “I am thrilled she is still publishing and sharing her findings,” said Lama.

Lama expects to use the book often in her work at UBC Library. “I will be able to learn a lot from this research and it will be an excellent reference when making recommendations about the conservations of objects in our collections”.

cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository for published and unpublished material produced by the UBC community and its partners was created to showcase and preserve intellectual output, and support teaching, learning, and research activities. Items in cIRcle are presented through UBC Library’s Open Collections, which provides additional features that increase the findability and promotion of research. Items can be found via search engines (such as Google) and have permanent URLs and Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), so they can be discovered, accessed, and preserved long-term for future generations.

Borrow Mary-Lou Florian’s books.

More about Open Access at UBC Library.

Melody Burton, Head Librarian, Katherine Kalsbeek Head of Rare Books and Special Collections and Dr. Gregory Mackie, assistant professor in UBC’s department of English.

Melody Burton, Head Librarian, Katherine Kalsbeek Head of Rare Books and Special Collections and Dr. Gregory Mackie, assistant professor in UBC’s department of English.

 

UBC Library has acquired of one of the world’s most extraordinary books.

Printed in a limited edition of only 438 copies, the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer was published by William Morris’s Kelmscott Press in 1896. Morris, a pivotal figure in the arts and crafts movement, spent four years designing what he believed to be the ideal book. Celebrated for its unique type, lavish decorative borders and remarkable illustrations, the poet William Butler Yeats later described it as the “most beautiful of all printed books.”

“The acquisition of this copy of the Kelmscott Chaucer is a significant coup for UBC,” said Gregory Mackie, assistant professor in UBC’s department of English. “Books like this one almost never come onto the international market, and only 48 copies exist in the world with this particular binding.”

With the acquisition of the Kelmscott Chaucer, UBC joins the likes of Oxford, Stanford, Cambridge, Princeton and other top ranking universities. 

“The acquisition of a book like this is an example of the Library and the department of English striving for a new level of excellence,”

said Katherine Kalsbeek Head, Rare Books and Special Collections. “The fact that we were able to acquire this copy, in this condition, in this binding is astounding.”

Purchased for $202,000 USD, the book is one of UBC’s most valuable holdings within Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC). It joins other famous books at RBSC, such as the Second Folio of Shakespeare, donated by Walter Koerner in 1960, and bolsters the library’s world-renowned Colbeck Collection of 19th-century literature, which includes several extremely rare Kelmscott Press books.

A joint acquisition by UBC Library and the faculty of arts, the Kelmscott Chaucer was purchased after two years of fundraising efforts, which included a substantial donation from the B.H. Breslauer Foundation of New York. “There was an amazing show of support for bringing this book to UBC.” said Kalsbeek, noting that UBC faculty, community members and UBC’s Centennial Initiatives Fund also made contributions toward the acquisition.

Perhaps most exciting is what this acquisition means for UBC students. “Our faculty has expressed real interest in incorporating the book into their course material, whether they’re teaching Chaucer or teaching book design,” said Kalsbeek.

Professor Mackie, for one, looks forward to using the book in his teaching and watching his students respond. “I think one of the things that is most magical about this book is that you open it and immediately get a sense of wonder. I think we tend to undervalue that nowadays,” he said. “That’s a great experience for students, especially undergraduates, when they are coming to university and learning about new things, to be really wowed by something. And this book has that wow factor in spades.”

Learn more about the Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections.

Dr-Santa-Ono_7804-770-Main_a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Vancouver-born biomedical researcher who is a pioneer in experimental medicine with an established track record as a senior leader at U.S. universities has become the 15th President and Vice Chancellor of the University of British Columbia, the university announced today at the Peter A. Allard School of Law on the Vancouver campus.

Since 2012, Dr. Santa Jeremy Ono has served as the President of the University of Cincinnati (UC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prior to that, he served as the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at UC. Under his leadership, UC achieved its largest enrollment in its history and received numerous accolades, including being named Public University of the Year by the Washington Center.

“I am greatly humbled by the opportunity to lead one of the world’s greatest universities,” said Ono. “UBC attracts the best and brightest faculty and students. It is uniquely positioned on the Pacific Rim and boasts one of the most diverse and sustainable campuses. I relish the opportunity to help UBC realize its aspirations and destiny as a truly global university.”

For Ono, returning to UBC is a homecoming of sorts. His father, Takashi Ono, is an accomplished mathematician, who formerly taught as a faculty member in UBC’s Math Department, which explains how Ono came to be born at St. Paul’s Hospital just 20 minutes away. His father is also a gifted pianist, who passed on his love of music to his son, who himself plays the cello.

 

Read the full UBC Public Affairs’ media release here

 

Read Dr. Santa Ono’s full biography here

 

Watch the

Above partial texts in italics and photo are courtesy of UBC Public Affairs

Dr-Santa-Ono_7804-770-Main_a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Vancouver-born biomedical researcher who is a pioneer in experimental medicine with an established track record as a senior leader at U.S. universities has become the 15th President and Vice Chancellor of the University of British Columbia, the university announced today at the Peter A. Allard School of Law on the Vancouver campus.

Since 2012, Dr. Santa Jeremy Ono has served as the President of the University of Cincinnati (UC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prior to that, he served as the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at UC. Under his leadership, UC achieved its largest enrollment in its history and received numerous accolades, including being named Public University of the Year by the Washington Center.

“I am greatly humbled by the opportunity to lead one of the world’s greatest universities,” said Ono. “UBC attracts the best and brightest faculty and students. It is uniquely positioned on the Pacific Rim and boasts one of the most diverse and sustainable campuses. I relish the opportunity to help UBC realize its aspirations and destiny as a truly global university.”

For Ono, returning to UBC is a homecoming of sorts. His father, Takashi Ono, is an accomplished mathematician, who formerly taught as a faculty member in UBC’s Math Department, which explains how Ono came to be born at St. Paul’s Hospital just 20 minutes away. His father is also a gifted pianist, who passed on his love of music to his son, who himself plays the cello.

 

Read the full UBC Public Affairs’ media release here

 

Read Dr. Santa Ono’s full biography here

 

Watch the

Above partial texts in italics and photo are courtesy of UBC Public Affairs

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