It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2018-2019!

 

In 2018-2019, cIRcle continued its focus on increasing faculty content with over 1,000 new items added – that’s a 9.6% increase from last year.

 

Examples of some new and ongoing cIRcle partnerships include the following: Database of Religious History (DRH) entries, Transnational Business Governance Interactions (TBGI) Working Papers, audio and video recordings of the Vancouver Institute Lectures, a mix of textual and other media content of the From the Ground Up: Buddhism & East Asian Religions, School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) Graduating Projects, and the UBC Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies’ Ziegler Series of video lecture recordings.

 

Another cIRcle highlight is the newly automated ingest stream of faculty content published by Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) via the SWORD (Simple Web-Service Offering Repository Deposit) protocol as well as cIRcle’s collaborative work in enhancing metadata and digital preservation with Artefactual and Atmire.

 

Discover UBC research in cIRcle – from preprints and postprints of journal articles to conference proceedings to departmental publications and technical reports to lecture/course notes, and much more.

 

Learn more about cIRcle

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of the MURC – UBC Student Services‘ site

 

Touted as the biggest undergraduate research conference in B.C., the Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC) is a key annual event highlighting the contributions of undergraduate scholarly inquiry and research at UBC. It affords an opportunity for undergraduate students campus-wide to present their singular or collaborative UBC research projects while sharing their unique UBC research perspectives and experiences.

 

Participation in the conference is on a voluntary basis, with students having the choice of giving either an oral, poster or visual arts/performance presentation of their work. Presentations are judged by graduate students, and prizes are awarded for the top oral, poster and visual arts/performance presentations at a closing celebratory reception.

 

You may know some past and most recent UBC MURC award winners but did you know that in 2012, three UBC MURC award winners – Alvin Ip (UBC Vancouver), Ben MacLeod (UBC Vancouver) and Ryan Trenholm (UBC Okanagan) – went abroad to represent UBC at the international 8th Universitas21 Undergraduate Research Conference (July 1 – 5, 2012) at the Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan? That’s just one of the noteworthy experiences enjoyed by UBC MURC award winners and shared with their fellow UBC students, academic and research mentors, family and friends at this unique conference.

 

With over 9,000 item views and 2,800 item downloads to date, check out the MURC award winner poster and slide presentations in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the Library’s Open Collections digital collections’ portal!

 

 

 

 

 

The Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC) celebrates the contributions of undergraduate scholarly inquiry/research at UBC. It provides an opportunity for students from across campus to present a project they have been working on while engaging in scholarly debate amongst each other.

 

Participation in the conference is on a voluntary basis, with students having the choice of giving either an oral, poster or visual arts/performance presentation of their work. Presentations are judged by graduate students, and prizes are awarded for the top oral, poster and visual arts/performance presentations at a closing celebratory reception.

 

The next MURC conference is happening at UBC on March 16, 2019 at 8:00 AM to 6:30 PM.

 

If you’re interested in presenting at MURC 2019, visit the MURC site for more details.

 

Browse the MURC collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the Library’s Open Collections portal

 

Above image is courtesy of the MURC – UBC Student Services‘ site

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2017-2018!

 

In 2017-2018, cIRcle reached another milestone of over 60,000 items and saw an increase of its annual growth rate from 8% in previous years to 10%.

 

This report highlights’ include a sampling of cIRcle’s new and ongoing partnerships, its growth and development along with a snapshot of its top content contributors.

 

Two spotlights of cIRcle projects and collections included in the report are the BioMed Central/SpringerOpen project and the noteworthy additions in the UBC President’s Speeches and Writing collection.

 

Explore UBC research in cIRcle, for example, the growing number of preprints and postprints of academic journal articles, conference proceedings, departmental publications, technical reports, course notes, and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to release the cIRcle Annual Impact & Activity Report 2016-2017!

 

In 2016-2017, cIRcle (UBC’s Digital Repository) had over 56,000 items. In the past two years, cIRcle has archived more than 4,000 deposits per year — an average annual growth rate of 8%.

 

Other highlights included in the report:

  • A breakdown of the increase in faculty content and a quick summary of the top content contributors
  • Developed cIRcle guidelines and practices on improving metadata for greater access and discoverability via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal
  • Featured Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum and UBC alumna, Mary-Lou Florian
  • Spotlight on a few key partnerships and collaborations such as the Vancouver Institute Lecture Series and more

 

A quick sampling of new additions to cIRcle included:

Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59683

Form follows parking : strategies for mitigating the impacts of excess parking supply http://hdl.handle.net/2429/57704

Embedding the Frames of Evidence-Based Practice : Intersections in Librarianship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58260

Research Data Management (RDM) Needs of Science and Engineering Researchers : A View from Canada http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58265

Analyzing Fire Ignition Data in the Kamloops, Lillooet and Merritt fire zones : with implications toward the effects of fire suppression on the landscape http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59241

The landscape of rare cancer : a sea of opportunity http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59312

Interventions to Improve Patient Hand Hygiene : A Systematic Review http://hdl.handle.net/2429/60520

 

And, last but not least by any means, we were thrilled to add the first fourteen items from UBC President Santa Ono and we look forward to adding more this year!

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

At the University of British Columbia (UBC), the ‘highest calibre [of] research faculty and students’ create, innovate and inspire while they work and study at its two campuses located in Vancouver and in the Okanagan Valley. According to UBC 2016/17 figures, it ‘secures approximately $600 million in research funding each year with 199 companies spun off from UBC research; 1,326 research projects with industry partners; and 1,172 research contracts and agreements with government and non-profits’.

 

If you are looking for an openly accessible collection of such published and unpublished scholarly research by the UBC faculty community and its partners, take a moment to learn more about this notable one.

 

The UBC Faculty of Research and Publications collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository showcases all types of content ranging from grant-funded research datasets to text files of preprint and postprint articles, case studies, technical reports, working papers, book reviews, conference proceedings and summaries to audio and video recording files to historical photographs of people, places, and objects.

 

With 3,521 items now and counting, the oldest item found in this collection was published back in 1929. More recently, one of the newest items found in cIRcle was a journal article published just this year by UBC authors from these interdisciplinary areas: Faculty of Arts, Library, Faculty of Medicine, School of Journalism and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

This collection covers a broad range of both historical and current thematic subjects such as air pollution, Canada, community environmental health, forest productivity, genocide, health human resources, HIV, homelessness, medical technology, monuments and memorials, prisoners, war, workplace health, and much more. So far, the latest top country views and downloads originate from the United States, Canada, China, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Republic of Korea, Australia, India, and the Netherlands.

 

Part of this unique collection is the Adam Jones Global Photo Archive created by UBC Okanagan professor Adam Jones, head of International Relations at UBC’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. He is known as a “[g]lobetrotter, acclaimed author, and genocide expert” who has visited more than 103 countries to date.

 

One newly added item garnering media attention this month is a report written by UBC professor and Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Cancer Primary Prevention, Dr. Carolyn Gotay et al. She provides an update on the activities of the Breast Cancer Prevention & Risk Assessment Clinic in British Columbia. So far, it has received 1,369 views from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Iran, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Japan.

 

Another part of this growing collection includes the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Also known as the UBC Learning Exchange, MRAi is a community engagement initiative based in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Did you know that the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is a funding partner and contributor of MRAi? With new items added nearly everyday, there are currently over 150 faculty research articles and other community-sourced historical materials from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which are now openly accessible in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

At the University of British Columbia (UBC), the ‘highest calibre [of] research faculty and students’ create, innovate and inspire while they work and study at its two campuses located in Vancouver and in the Okanagan Valley. According to UBC 2016/17 figures, it ‘secures approximately $600 million in research funding each year with 199 companies spun off from UBC research; 1,326 research projects with industry partners; and 1,172 research contracts and agreements with government and non-profits’.

 

If you are looking for an openly accessible collection of such published and unpublished scholarly research by the UBC faculty community and its partners, take a moment to learn more about this notable one.

 

The UBC Faculty of Research and Publications collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository showcases all types of content ranging from grant-funded research datasets to text files of preprint and postprint articles, case studies, technical reports, working papers, book reviews, conference proceedings and summaries to audio and video recording files to historical photographs of people, places, and objects.

 

With 3,521 items now and counting, the oldest item found in this collection was published back in 1929. More recently, one of the newest items found in cIRcle was a journal article published just this year by UBC authors from these interdisciplinary areas: Faculty of Arts, Library, Faculty of Medicine, School of Journalism and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

This collection covers a broad range of both historical and current thematic subjects such as air pollution, Canada, community environmental health, forest productivity, genocide, health human resources, HIV, homelessness, medical technology, monuments and memorials, prisoners, war, workplace health, and much more. So far, the latest top country views and downloads originate from the United States, Canada, China, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Republic of Korea, Australia, India, and the Netherlands.

 

Part of this unique collection is the Adam Jones Global Photo Archive created by UBC Okanagan professor Adam Jones, head of International Relations at UBC’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. He is known as a “[g]lobetrotter, acclaimed author, and genocide expert” who has visited more than 103 countries to date.

 

One newly added item garnering media attention this month is a report written by UBC professor and Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Cancer Primary Prevention, Dr. Carolyn Gotay et al. She provides an update on the activities of the Breast Cancer Prevention & Risk Assessment Clinic in British Columbia. So far, it has received 1,369 views from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Iran, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Japan.

 

Another part of this growing collection includes the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Also known as the UBC Learning Exchange, MRAi is a community engagement initiative based in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Did you know that the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is a funding partner and contributor of MRAi? With new items added nearly everyday, there are currently over 150 faculty research articles and other community-sourced historical materials from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which are now openly accessible in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy: Pixabay

 

It is a pleasure to announce the arrival of a new item recently added to cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository resulting from the collaborative efforts between a world-renowned scholar and several of UBC’s academic research units and community partners – School of Music, Hong Kong Studies Initiative, Centre for Chinese Research, Museum of Anthropology, and St. John’s College.

 

Nancy Yunhwa Rao is an Associate Director of Academic Studies who is both the Head of the Composition Program and the Head of the Music Theory Program of the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. As “one of the leading scholars in Chinese American music studies”, she has amassed award-winning research which focuses on the “musical history of Chinese in the United States, Canada, and Cuba” which she “mined [from] immigration files” and so forth.

 

Examples of her published research are found in a variety of journal publications such as the “Cambridge Opera Journal, Journal of the Society for American Music, Journal of 19th Century Music Review, as well as several collections of essays”. Interestingly, she has published ‘a book on Chinatown Opera Theater in North America via the University Illinois Press’ which is completely filled with the “analysis of playbills, performing networks, opera arias, stage spectacles, and more”.

 

Watch Parts One and Two of her talk here

 

Explore the Chinese Special Collections‘ Library Research Guide

 

 

 

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cIRcle FAQ of the Day:

Have you wondered, How do I cite an item that I have found in cIRcle?

If so, read on. (If not, still read on and learn something new.)

 

Always cite the published version if available, so the author(s) receives credit through databases that track citation counts (e.g. Thomson Reuter’s Web of Science). Note that the page numbering of the cIRcle version may not correspond to the page numbering in the published version.

However, there may be circumstances where you need to cite the cIRcle version. Even if citing the cIRcle version, cite the published version as well so that the author(s) receive citation recognition, as mentioned. Cite the cIRcle version as follows:

Klinka, K., Varga, P. and Chourmouzis, C. (1999). Towards a quantitative classification of soil nutrient regimes in British Columbia : Comparison of regional studies. cIRcle: UBC’s Digital Repository: Scientia Silvica Extension Series. Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/764.

 

You may well ask, But what if the item is an unpublished work?

To cite an unpublished work, such as a thesis or dissertation in cIRcle, use the same format:

Blackman, M. J. (2008). Achieving economic and social sustainability in the inner city: The role of business improvements districts. cIRcle: UBC’s Digital Repository: Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) 2008+. Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/2445.

The URI is the most important piece of the cIRcle citation, as it is a permanent (a.k.a. persistent) and unique link.

 

Parts of this FAQ adapted from Open Research Online, FAQ at: http://oro.open.ac.uk/help/helpfaq.html#How_should_I_cite_items.

 

Find more cIRcle FAQs here

 

 

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