In celebration of open access and its global impact for over a decade, UBC and SFU will be participating in the 2018 International Open Access Week event during October 22-28, 2018.

 

Throughout UBC’s 2018 Open Access Week event, scholars will showcase and discuss their innovative research, teaching and learning skills and experiences while inspiring others to learn more and get involved with the global open access movement. These events will highlight the various opportunities and pathways enabling open scholarship for researchers at UBC and beyond.

 

Similar to past UBC Open Access Week events, this year will include free lectures, workshops, a panel discussion with a Q&A session, seminars, and symposia for students, faculty, staff, and the general public. Topical and timely issues will include the following ones to list just a few:

 

  • new challenges faced by practitioners and stakeholders
  • developing a scholarly/publishing profile
  • applying Creative Commons licenses to your work
  • navigating the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy (NSERC, SSHRC and CIHR)
  • discovering Open Educational Resources (OER)

 

Visit Open UBC to register and attend these free events

 

Learn more about Open Access at UBC

 

 

Xwi7xwa Library has a wide range of carefully curated library research guides (also known as libguides), covering everything from Aboriginal Filmmakers to Indigenous Education K-12. These guides are particularly helpful places to start when looking for information about a specific disciple or subject area. Visit the portal to see all Xwi7xwa Library authored libguides.

 

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Prepping for UBC 3MT 2018?

 

Working on a slide presentation for a spring/summer conference or other event?

 

Interested in open access? Curious about scholarly publishing? Confused about copyright, author rights and more?

 

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, this free UBC graduate workshop is for you!

 

Showcasing your Graduate Research

in UBC’s Open Access Digital Repository:

Help with Copyright and More (Graduate Pathways to Success)

 

presented by the cIRcle Office and Scholarly Communications and Copyright Services

 

Date: Tuesday, 06 February 2018

Time: 12:30 to 14:00

Location: Thea Koerner House, 6371 Crescent Road

 

Participants will learn to:

 

  • Describe and format their work for deposit in cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository
  • See how to apply Creative Commons Licenses to their work
  • Create presentations with good Copyright practices
  • Consult one-on-one with a member of Copyright Services at UBC

 

Register here

 

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Prepping for UBC 3MT 2018?

 

Working on a slide presentation for a spring/summer conference or other event?

 

Interested in open access? Curious about scholarly publishing? Confused about copyright, author rights and more?

 

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, this free UBC graduate workshop is for you!

 

Showcasing your Graduate Research

in UBC’s Open Access Digital Repository:

Help with Copyright and More (Graduate Pathways to Success)

 

presented by the cIRcle Office and Scholarly Communications and Copyright Services

 

Date: Tuesday, 06 February 2018

Time: 12:30 to 14:00

Location: Thea Koerner House, 6371 Crescent Road

 

Participants will learn to:

 

  • Describe and format their work for deposit in cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository
  • See how to apply Creative Commons Licenses to their work
  • Create presentations with good Copyright practices
  • Consult one-on-one with a member of Copyright Services at UBC

 

Register here

 

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

“Surveying the Landscape: Research Data Management,
Data Governance and Ethics”

Dr. Jacqueline Quinless
CLIR Data Fellow at University of Victoria McPherson Library
Adjunct Professor, Department of Sociology


Time:
Thursday, January 25, 2018, 1:00-2:30 pm

Location: University of Victoria McPherson Library / Mearns Center for Learning, Digital Scholarship Commons (3rd floor)

Registration: To attend the January 25 event in Victoria, please email Scott Johnston at scjo@uvic.ca.

Webcast: This event has now ended, but you can watch the recording of the presentation.

Abstract:
The history of the collection of data on Indigenous people across the globe has been problematic because of the methods which have failed to capture important differences relating to Indigenous peoples and communities and also in the way the data is processed, analyzed and disseminated. The 94 recommendations of the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) have further generated responses regarding how to address the impacts of residential schools.

This presentation will draw on a 2017-2018 campus-wide research study at the University of Victoria to discuss Research Data Management and challenges to open sharing. The conversation will explore topics related to data curation and data management, open access, and practices that are both ethically and culturally informed in the context of Indigenous protocols and data initiatives.

About the presenter:
Dr. Jacqueline Quinless
is currently a CLIR Data Fellow, and works in Digital Scholarship and Strategy at the University of Victoria. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Sociology and an award winning sociologist recognized by the Canadian Sociological Association (CSA) and Angus-Reid Foundation for her community-based research to advancing Human Welfare in Canada.

Read our highlights from the past fiscal year which include growing our collections, improving student spaces, connecting research to the community and engaging with our community partners.

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

In musical practice, there is an assortment of musical elements at “play”.

 

Just think. Real-time creative decision-making. Risk-taking. Collaboration.

 

So what happens when they all “play” together?

 

Improvisation! That is, musical improvisation.

 

“I’ll play it first and tell you what it’s called later.” – Miles Davis

 

The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) is known as “a central source for the collection and dissemination of research on the social implications of improvisational practices”.

 

Founded as a partnered research institute from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) project, “Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice” (ICASP), IICSI has its own research team. It consists of 58 scholars, students, creative practitioners, and community partners representing 20 different academic institutions including the University of British Columbia (UBC) and over 30 community-based organizations.

 

Together, they are “creating a vibrant intellectual hub and a focal point for leading-edge research and critical inquiry in the field of improvisation studies”. Through this network comes the following benefits such as ‘new technologies and models for practice-based research, knowledge transfers, new research, student training, and development of policies, instruments, and technologies’ to list just a few.

 

IICSI has three main strategic research priorities: 1) Improvisation as Practice-Based Research, 2) Improvisation, Community Health, and Social Responsibility, and 3) Improvisation, Intermediality, and Experimental Technologies.

 

Below is a quick soupçon of the IICSI sample research-intensive questions under current exploration:

 

Sample Research Questions re: 1)

How do arts-based improvisatory practices themselves suggest new models of knowledge transfer?

How might these practices help us measure the impact of our research activities, and how might they enable a broader range of stakeholders to engage with these activities?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 2)

How do improvisational arts-based practices contribute to the development and flourishing of healthy communities?

How (and to what extent) do these practices help communities (particularly at-risk and aggrieved populations) produce new understandings of identity, history, memory, and the body?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 3)

How can new technologies help facilitate the ability of communities to improvise across time, space, and ability limitations?

How might intermedial co-creation develop new opportunities for mobilizing knowledge?

 

With more research questions arising faster than they can be probed, it is good to know that IICSI has created an online research library housing a range of items such as films, articles, think pieces, and interviews.

 

At UBC, cIRcle is not only helping to disseminate IICSI research and make it openly accessible, it is also archiving and preserving this unique musical form of scholarly research for future scholars, practitioners and the general public.

 

Explore the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) Colloquium cIRcle collection via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal and stay tuned for more!

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

In musical practice, there is an assortment of musical elements at “play”.

 

Just think. Real-time creative decision-making. Risk-taking. Collaboration.

 

So what happens when they all “play” together?

 

Improvisation! That is, musical improvisation.

 

“I’ll play it first and tell you what it’s called later.” – Miles Davis

 

The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) is known as “a central source for the collection and dissemination of research on the social implications of improvisational practices”.

 

Founded as a partnered research institute from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) project, “Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice” (ICASP), IICSI has its own research team. It consists of 58 scholars, students, creative practitioners, and community partners representing 20 different academic institutions including the University of British Columbia (UBC) and over 30 community-based organizations.

 

Together, they are “creating a vibrant intellectual hub and a focal point for leading-edge research and critical inquiry in the field of improvisation studies”. Through this network comes the following benefits such as ‘new technologies and models for practice-based research, knowledge transfers, new research, student training, and development of policies, instruments, and technologies’ to list just a few.

 

IICSI has three main strategic research priorities: 1) Improvisation as Practice-Based Research, 2) Improvisation, Community Health, and Social Responsibility, and 3) Improvisation, Intermediality, and Experimental Technologies.

 

Below is a quick soupçon of the IICSI sample research-intensive questions under current exploration:

 

Sample Research Questions re: 1)

How do arts-based improvisatory practices themselves suggest new models of knowledge transfer?

How might these practices help us measure the impact of our research activities, and how might they enable a broader range of stakeholders to engage with these activities?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 2)

How do improvisational arts-based practices contribute to the development and flourishing of healthy communities?

How (and to what extent) do these practices help communities (particularly at-risk and aggrieved populations) produce new understandings of identity, history, memory, and the body?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 3)

How can new technologies help facilitate the ability of communities to improvise across time, space, and ability limitations?

How might intermedial co-creation develop new opportunities for mobilizing knowledge?

 

With more research questions arising faster than they can be probed, it is good to know that IICSI has created an online research library housing a range of items such as films, articles, think pieces, and interviews.

 

At UBC, cIRcle is not only helping to disseminate IICSI research and make it openly accessible, it is also archiving and preserving this unique musical form of scholarly research for future scholars, practitioners and the general public.

 

Explore the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) Colloquium cIRcle collection via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal and stay tuned for more!

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

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