Andrew Kaufman, Camille Martin and Barry Webster will be the last authors to read in the final Robson Reading Series event on Thursday, March 14. The event will feature the authors reading from their books, discussion and a chance for guests to have their books autographed. 

UBC Bookstore and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre made the difficult decision to conclude the Robson Reading Series at the end of March 2013. This step was taken in light of the 2012 closure of UBC Library’s Robson Square branch, and the coming closure of the UBC Bookstore at Robson Square.

For more than 10 years, the Robson Reading Series has helped the University share knowledge and engage communities at UBC and beyond. The series featured seasoned and debut writers reading from their works in various genres, and gave them a platform to discuss their works with the audience in a warm and welcoming environment – indeed, our motto has been “live literature and cozy conversation.”

For more on the decision to conclude the Robson Reading Series, visit Update: Robson Reading Series.

ANDREW KAUFMAN, CAMILLE MARTIN and BARRY WEBSTER

at the Robson Reading Series

Thursday, March 14, 2013, 7pm

UBC Bookstore at Robson Square

Robson Reading Series events are free and open to the public but registration is recommended. To register for this event, please click here.

Photo credit Lee Towndrow

Born Weird (Random House of Canada) tells the tale of the Weird family who have always been a little off, but not one of them ever suspected that they’d been cursed by their grandmother.

At the moment of the births of her five grandchildren Annie Weird gave each one a special power. Richard, the oldest, always keeps safe; Abba always has hope; Lucy is never lost and Kent can beat anyone in a fight. As for Angie, she always forgives, instantly. But over the years these so-called blessings ended up ruining their lives.

Now Annie is dying and she has one last task for Angie: gather her far-flung brothers and sisters and assemble them in her grandmother’s hospital room so that at the moment of her death, she can lift these blessings-turned-curses. And Angie has just two weeks to do it.

What follows is a quest like no other, tearing up highways and racing through airports, from a sketchy Winnipeg nursing home to the small island kingdom of Upliffta, from the family’s crumbling ancestral Toronto mansion to a motel called Love. And there is also the search for the answer to the greatest family mystery of all: what really happened to their father, whose maroon Maserati was fished out of a lake so many years ago?

Andrew Kaufman is the author of All My Friends Are SuperheroesThe Tiny Wife, and The Waterproof Bible. He was born in Wingham, Ontario, the birthplace of Alice Munro, making him the second-best writer from a town of 3000. His work has been published in 11 countries and translated into 9 languages. He is also an accomplished screenwriter and lives in Toronto with his wife and their 2 children.
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LOOMS CAMILLE MARTINThe title of Looms signifies the weaving tool as well as the shadowing appearance of something, These “woven tales” were inspired by Barbara Guest’s statement that a tale “doesn’t tell the truth about itself; it tells us what it dreams about.” The strands of their surreal allegories converse, one idea giving rise to another, and the paths of their dialogue become the fabric of the narrative. In a second meaning, something that looms remains in a state of imminent arrival. Such are these tales, like parables with infinitely deferred lessons.

Camille Martin is the author four collections of poetry: Looms (Shearsman Books), SonnetsCodes of Public Sleep, and Sesame Kiosk (out of print). A chapbook, If Leaf, Then Arpeggio, was recently released from Above/Ground Press.

She has presented and published her work internationally. One of her current poetry projects is “Blueshift Road.” She’s also working on “The Evangeline Papers,” a poetic sequence based on her Acadian/Cajun heritage and her participation in archaeological digs at an eighteenth-century village in Nova Scotia, where her finds included ancestral pipes and wine bottles. Martin earned an MFA in Poetry from the University of New Orleans and a PhD in English from Louisiana State University.

BarryWebster_creditMaximeTremblay

Photo credit Maxime Tremblay

Lava In My BonesIn Barry Webster‘s latest novel, The Lava in My Bones (Arsenal Pulp Press), a frustrated Canadian geologist studying global warming becomes obsessed with eating rocks after embarking on his first same-sex relationship in Europe. Back home, his young sister is a high-school girl who suddenly starts to ooze honey through her pores, an affliction that attracts hordes of bees as well as her male classmates but ultimately turns her into a social pariah. Meanwhile, their obsessive Pentecostal mother repeatedly calls on the Holy Spirit to rid her family of demons. The siblings are reunited on a ship bound for Europe where they hope to start a new life, but are unaware that their disguised mother is also on board and plotting to win back their souls, with the help of the Virgin Mary.

Told in a lush baroque prose, this intense, extravagant magic-realist novel combines elements of fairy tales, horror movies, and romances to create a comic, hallucinatory celebration of excess and sensuality.

Barry Webster‘s first book, The Sound of All Flesh (Porcupine’s Quill), won the ReLit Award for best short-story collection in 2005. He has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award, the CBC-Quebec Prize, and the Hugh MacLennan Award. Originally from Toronto, he currently lives in East Montreal.

Author giving a reading

Naomi Beth Wakan reads at a Robson Reading Series event. Photo credit: Robson Reading Series.

The conclusion of the Robson Reading Series is featured in the Globe and Mail and Quill and Quire.

For more information, please see the announcement about the reading series. Readings remain scheduled until the end of March – please visit the Robson Reading Series for more information.

WALID BITAR, BASMA KAVANAGH and MISSY MARSTON

at the Robson Reading Series

Thursday, February 21, 2013, 7pm

UBC Bookstore at Robson Square

Robson Reading Series events are free and open to the public but registration is recommended. To register for this event, please click here.

 

    They have no maps. Ours, I’ll redraw.
    Isn’t itself, their neck of the woods;
    needs a rest – something more than a nap,
    and less than death, though death wouldn’t hurt.

In Divide and Rule, Walid Bitar delivers a sequence of dramatic monologues, variations on the theme of power, each in rhymed quatrains. Though the pieces grow out of Bitar’s personal experiences over the last decade, both in North America and the Middle East, he is not primarily a confessional writer. His work might be called cubist, the perspectives constantly shifting, point followed by counterpoint, subtle phrase by savage outburst. Bitar’s enigmatic speakers are partially rational creatures, have some need to explain, and may succeed in partially explaining, but, in the end, communication and subterfuge are inseparable – must, so to speak, co-exist.

Walid Bitar was born in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1961. He immigrated to Canada in 1969. His previous poetry collections are Maps with Moving Parts (Brick Books, 1988)2 Guys on Holy Land (Wesleyan University Press, 1993)Bastardi Puri (Porcupine’s Quill, 2005) and The Empire’s Missing Links (Véhicule Press, 2008). From 1990 to 1991, he held a Teaching-Writing Fellowship at the University of Iowa. His newest work, Divide and Rule (Coach House Books, June 2012), is a collection of dramatic monologues. He lives in Toronto.

Basma Kavanagh’s debut collection, Distillō, engages the natural world and seeks to explore our relationship to it. Hers is a poetics of description which subverts scientific observation and the authoritative language of nomenclature for mythopoetic ends. In the opening section (“Moisture”), precipitation is dissected and categorized, but ultimately the deluge of “rain making rain, /making rain” overwhelms controlled interrogation and undulating imagery saturates everything. Nomenclature reappears elsewhere in the book, attempting to anchor object poems about west-coast flora and fauna–salmon, elk, bear, bigleaf maple, bog myrtle–which otherwise drift toward the mythworld and gesture in the direction of the ethereal and the totemic. Understanding that language can be most precise when it harbours ambiguity and surprise, Kavanagh experiments with pattern poems and the layering of multiple voices in her attempt to express “a fullness /an absence /of self.” This is a book which turns over rocks and looks under them in search of truth in its soft, damp hiding places, poems which instruct us to “[d]escend. Blend /your knowing with the breath of earth”.

Basma Kavanagh is a painter, poet and letterpress printer living in Kentville, Nova Scotia. She produces artist’s books under the imprint Rabbit Square Books. Her poems have appeared in the chapbook A Rattle of Leaves, published by Red Dragonfly Press, and included in anthologies in the United States.

The Love Monster is the tall tale of one woman’s struggle with mid-life issues. The main character, Margaret H. Atwood, has psoriasis, a boring job and a bad attitude. Her cheating husband has left her. And none of her pants fit any more. Missy Marston takes the reader on a hilarious journey of recovery. Hope comes in the form of a dope-smoking senior citizen, a religious fanatic, a good lawyer and a talking turtle (not to mention Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Warren Zevon, Neil Armstrong and a yogi buried deep underground). And, of course, hope comes in the form of a love-sick alien speaking in the voice of Donald Sutherland. More than an irreverent joyride, The Love Monster is also a sweet and tender look at the pain and indignity of being an adult human and a sincere exploration of the very few available remedies: art, love, religion, relentless optimism, and alien intervention.

Missy Marston‘s writing has appeared in various publications, including Grain and Arc Poetry Magazine. She was the winner of the Lillian I. Found Award for her poem, “Jesus Christ came from my home town.” As explained in her National Post Afterword columns, Missy Marston loves Margaret Atwood, aliens and Donald Sutherland. Her first novel, The Love Monster, is an ode to all three. She has been called “an irreverent Canadian” by Commentary Magazine and “weird, funny and moving” by The Globe and Mail. She is fine with that. The Love Monster is her first novel. She lives in Ottawa, Ontario.

 

Author reading at the Robson Reading Series

Naomi Beth Wakan reads at a Robson Reading Series event. Photo credit: Robson Reading Series.

UBC Bookstore and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre have made the difficult decision to conclude the Robson Reading Series at the end of March 2013. This step was taken in light of the 2012 closure of UBC Library’s Robson Square branch, and the coming closure of the UBC Bookstore at Robson Square.

For more than 10 years, the Robson Reading Series has helped the University share knowledge and engage communities at UBC and beyond. The series featured seasoned and debut writers reading from their works in various genres, and gave them a platform to discuss their works with the audience in a warm and welcoming environment – indeed, our motto has been “live literature and cozy conversation.”

We have been very fortunate to host Canadian talents such as Wayson Choy, Ian Ferguson, Annabel Lyon, Ray Tsu, Evelyn Lau, Esi Edugyan, Steve Burgess, C.E. Gatchalian, Alix Ohlin and Grant Lawrence. While the series is winding down, we encourage everyone to continue to support new and emerging works from Canadian writers. UBC Bookstore and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre remain committed to providing books by Canadian authors to the community. In addition, readings remain scheduled until the end of March – please visit the Robson Reading Series for more information.

We would like to thank the Canada Council for the Arts for its generous support over the years, the wonderful authors who have charmed us with their works, the publishers for their invaluable contributions, and the staff at UBC Bookstore and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre who have worked tirelessly to bring fantastic talent to the Robson Reading Series. Lastly, we thank you – our audience – for attending the readings and making the series such a success.

 

Image credit: C.E. Gatchalian

On Thursday, May 10, C.E. (Chris) Gatchalian launches his book Falling in Time (Scirocco Drama) in Vancouver, beginning with an event presented by UBC’s Robson Reading Series. 

Gatchalian, an Artistic Producer at Screaming Weenie Productions, will read from his newly published book – a play that stunned Vancouver theatre audiences when it premiered in November 2011. He will also read from his previous book, Crossing & Other Plays (Lethe Press), and excerpts from “Notes Towards an Essay About Maria Callas,” which has been included in Best Canadian Essays 2011 (Tightrope Books). A Q&A will follow the reading, held from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Lillooet Room (301) in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

Born, raised and based in Vancouver, Gatchalian writes drama, poetry, fiction and non-fiction. He is the author of four books of drama and one book of poetry. His plays, which include Broken, Crossing, Claire and Motifs & Repetitions & Other Plays, have appeared on stages nationally and internationally, as well as on radio and television. Gatchalian was the recipient of the Gordon Armstrong Playwright’s Rent Award in 2005 and was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in 2003.

To register for this event, please visit our Eventbrite page.
For more information about this event, please contact Allan Cho

Partners
      

 

A recent performance by Kevin McNeilly is now available in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository.  The webcast was sponsored by Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC) and hosted by the Robson Reading Series at IKBLC. Kevin McNeilly is an associate professor in the Department of English at UBC. He has written and published scholarship and critical essays on a variety of literature, media and music, including work by writers, thinkers and performers such as Charles Mingus, Elizabeth Bishop, Jan Zwicky, Miles Davis, and Robert Creeley. He is a member of the “Improvisation, Community and Social Practice” research initiative. Embouchure (Nightwood Editions, 2011) is his debut poetry collection. Watch this performance in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/40413.

Did you know?

There are over 100 items in the IKBLC Multimedia collection in cIRcle. Currently, the top item in this collection is a podcast on ‘melatonin therapy for difficult sleep disorders of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities’ by Dr. James Jan. Listen to it via cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/301.

Above partial excerpt in italics and image is courtesy of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre website at The University of British Columbia.

Michael V. Smith, an Assistant Professor of creative writing at UBC’s Okanagan campus and an award-winning author, is profiled in the Ubyssey – UBC’s student newspaper.

Smith will read from his work on Thursday, November 10 as part of the Robson Reading Series, held at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

Author Naomi Beth Wakan reads Sept. 16, 2010 at Robson Square (photo credit: Elias Wakan)

Overwrought ballerinas in Various Positions. Anglo-Saxon poetry forged by Curious Masonry. Something Fierce in the history of Chile. Progress choked in a small working-class town.

All these titles and the Man Booker Prize for Fiction nominee Esi Edugyan are just some of the delights to come as the Robson Reading Series launches its 2011 fall season.

Founded in 2002 as a partnership between UBC Bookstore and UBC Library at Robson Square, the Robson Reading Series is one of the longest-running reading series in Vancouver. The multi-genre series features emerging and established authors from Canada and beyond.

Check out some of the events this fall at UBC Library/Bookstore at Robson Square and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

Admission is free and everyone is welcome.

 

2011 Fall Season Schedule

At the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre:

 

September 29

2 pm

Timothy Taylor, The Blue Light Project

November 10

3 p.m.

Michael V. Smith, Progress

 

UBC Library/Bookstore at Robson Square:

September 22

7 p.m.

Matthew J. Trafford, The Divinity Gene

Linda Besner, The Id Kid

October 13

7 p.m.

Johanna Skibsrud, This Will Be Difficult to Explain & Other Stories

Martha Schabas, Various Positions

October 27

7 p.m.

Susan McCaslin, Demeter Goes Skydiving

Christopher Patton, Curious Masonry

November 17

7 p.m.

Carmen Aguirre, Something Fierce: Memoirs of a Revolutionary Daughter

Rishma Dunlop, Lover Through Departure

December 1

7 p.m.

Michael Christie, The Beggar’s Garden

Ashley Little, PRICK: Confessions of a Tattoo Artist

Kim Clark, Attemptations

December 15

7 p.m.

Esi Edugyan, Half-Blood Blues

Jen Sookfong Lee, The Better Mother

The Robson Reading Series gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts, UBC Bookstore, UBC Library and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, and UBC Robson Square.

For more information on the authors visit: http://www.ikebarberlearningcentre.ubc.ca/robson.
For more information on the series and upcoming events visit www.robsonreadingseries.ubc.ca or facebook.com/robsonreadingseries

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