News Release from Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL): 

 

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) are collaborating to facilitate Canadian support of international open infrastructure through the Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS). Under this initiative, Canadian institutions will contribute toward the sustainability of selected key international services in the open scholarship ecosystem.

 

SCOSS aims to help sustain essential open scholarship infrastructure. In doing so, SCOSS brings together a community of experts to evaluate critical open science services that lack sustainable financing, and then encourages institutions worldwide to financially support the services that it recommends.

 

Through the collaboration between CARL and CRKN, Canadian institutions will have the option of supporting SCOSS-endorsed services collectively. Benefiting from CRKN’s national infrastructure, CARL and CRKN members can contribute at reduced rates. This increases efficiency, reduces administrative overhead, and has the potential to increase Canadian participation.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the UBC Tri-Agency Open Access Policy

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible via cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News Release from Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (Government of Canada): 

 

The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, is inviting stakeholders, researchers, community leaders and public policy-makers to help shape a new $275-million Tri-Council Fund focused on international, interdisciplinary and high-risk research activities. Funding for the five-year initiative is a result of the federal government’s unprecedented investment of close to $4 billion in science announced in Budget 2018.

 

Designed by the Canada Research Coordinating Committee (CRCC), the new Tri-Council Fund will strengthen multidisciplinary collaboration between researchers and students across the country to accelerate Canada’s transition to a more modern approach to research. It will enable our researchers to undertake important work that can lead to discoveries that positively impact the lives of Canadians.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the UBC Tri-Agency Open Access Policy

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible via cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you a new UBC faculty member? Attend the next Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC

 

The Office of the Vice-President, Research & Innovation, and SPARC office invite you to attend a Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC.

 

Hear about the latest information and resources available regarding the SSHRC funded programs as well as its future plans.

 

SPEAKER: Tim Wilson, Executive Director, SSHRC Research Grants and Partnerships

WHEN: 2pm-3:30pm on Tuesday, April 10, 2018

WHERE: Michael Smith Labs, room 102

 

Register here

 

Above text is courtesy of SPARC

 

 

 

News Release from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC):

 

Research is at the heart of understanding the challenges and opportunities people face in areas such as education, immigration and technology. That’s why the Government of Canada continues to support the work of our country’s social scientists and humanities researchers. The evidence they produce informs policies that improve our understanding of each other and our communities.

To support their efforts, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced today more than $265 million in funding for over 3,300 social sciences and humanities research projects across Canada.

 

The funding is being awarded through scholarships, fellowships, and grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), one of the three federal granting councils responsible for supporting researchers whose work helps fuel a stronger economy, healthy communities and a growing middle class.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the Award Recipients‘ list

 

 

Explore UBC’s Tri-Agency Open Access Policy here

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News Release from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC):

 

Research is at the heart of understanding the challenges and opportunities people face in areas such as education, immigration and technology. That’s why the Government of Canada continues to support the work of our country’s social scientists and humanities researchers. The evidence they produce informs policies that improve our understanding of each other and our communities.

To support their efforts, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced today more than $265 million in funding for over 3,300 social sciences and humanities research projects across Canada.

 

The funding is being awarded through scholarships, fellowships, and grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), one of the three federal granting councils responsible for supporting researchers whose work helps fuel a stronger economy, healthy communities and a growing middle class.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the Award Recipients‘ list

 

 

Explore UBC’s Tri-Agency Open Access Policy here

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is excitement among researchers both nationally and internationally on the recent U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ statement. Why? It focuses on sustainable publishing.

 

As a collaborative body of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities, the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ works to “foster the development and delivery of long-term, sustainable higher education and research policy, in Canada and around the world”.  These Canadian universities are “home to world-class researchers using state-of-the-art research infrastructure to make ground-breaking discoveries” as they “train tomorrow’s citizens, entrepreneurs and leaders, and work with partners from the public, private and government sectors to mobilize knowledge and capitalize on it”.

 

The message by Suzanne Corbeil, U15 Executive Director, states in part that “[w]e know investing in research and science pays dividends for all Canadians. It spurs innovation and fosters the curiosity and creativity that our best and brightest minds direct towards solving society’s greatest challenges. It also enables us to ensure we are developing the best and brightest talent for the workforce of tomorrow, and are able to conduct research in world-class facilities that can drive growth of innovative companies.“

 

In its preamble, the U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing emphasizes that, “Access to research and scholarly outputs is essential for scientific discovery, innovation, and education. To maximize knowledge transfer and impact, our researchers’ work must be made readily available around the globe. Research-intensive universities also require timely and continuing access to international research results and scholarship in order to advance and disseminate knowledge, and to develop the next generation of researchers.”

 

The five key principles and their highlights found in the U15 statement are briefly listed directly below:

 

  1. Open Access – a necessity for an accessible and sustainable model of scholarly publishing
  2. Public Interest – disseminating scholarly publications and other research outputs as widely as possible
  3. Quality – rigorous peer review processes and effective research impact measures in all forms of academic publishing
  4. Accountability – highest possible proportion of public dollars invested in research and education
  5. Innovation – collaborative development of new models of scholarly communications benefit the academy and the public in the digital age

 

Download the full U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing here

 

Explore Open Access and more at UBC

 

Browse UBC’s digital repository for research and teaching materials

 

 

Above logo is courtesy of U15

 

 

A new open science prize has arrived on the international scholarly community stage and is causing a positive stir among global researchers and their research teams who come from a wide breadth of disciplines and fields of study.

It is “sponsored by a collaboration among the U.K.-based Wellcome Trust, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute” and is hugely welcomed by researchers “who are develop[ing] innovative tools and services that could unleash the power of data to advance discovery and improve health around the world”.

“It’s really bringing to light the nascent ideas that researchers are thinking about, but not necessarily put out there yet,” as per Aki MacFarlane, Programme Officer in the Open Research team with Wellcome Trust. “We’ve managed to bring some awareness to lots of things going on that we as funders and public were not aware of — which is great.”

Read the full SPARC announcement here

 

First-ever Open Science Prize by the Numbers:

  • Six finalist projects from a field of 96 solutions proposed by applicants in 45 countries
  • 4,000 votes came in from 76 countries to narrow the field from six to three
  • Final winner (below) was chosen by a review committee appointed by the prize sponsors
  • Grand prize award-winning team won $230,000

 

Open Science Prize grand prize winner:

Nextstrain

An open-source project to harness the scientific and public health potential of pathogen genome data (in real time)

 

 

Other Open Science Prize finalists:

Fruit Fly Brain Observatory

An open source platform for studying fruit fly brain function, and for investigating fruit fly brain disease models that are highly relevant to the mechanisms of human neurological and psychiatric disorders

 

Open Neuroimaging Laboratory

Lowering barriers to data and tools for open collaborative science of the brain

 

MyGene2

A portal through which families with rare genetic conditions who are interested in sharing their health and genetic information can connect with other families, clinicians, and researchers

 

OpenAQ

Empower communities to end air inequality through open data (in real-time)

 

OpenTrials FDA

Enabling better access to drug approval packages submitted to and made available by the Food and Drug Administration

 

 

Why publish Open Access?

 

Discover Open UBC

 

Open Access publishing and knowledge creation support at UBC

 

 

Above image is courtesy of National Institutes of Health (NIH)

 

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to co-present

Open for Collaboration: Is it Time for Canada to Implement a Unified Open Strategy for Higher Education?

October 22 2015, 6:30-8:30pm

Room 1430, Harbour Centre (SFU Vancouver)

515 Hastings St, Vancouver

This special event is presented in collaboration with
SFU Library, UBC Library, BCcampus, Public Knowledge Project, and COPPUL as part of Open Access Week.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register visit: http://tiny.cc/oaweek15

Update (Oct. 16): Registration for in-person attendance is full, but you can still get on the wait list via the link above, or you can participate online via webcast: http://tiny.cc/oaweeklive

A link to the recorded version of this event will be provided here as soon as it is available.

Embedded within the vision of post-secondary institutions across British Columbia are the values of contributing to knowledge across disciplines and sharing the results of research with the local and global communities.

Spurred by the need to make higher education accessible to all, the open movement has gained ground as the Internet evolved to enable easy sharing of different forms of media. However, while the notion of “open” in higher education has been growing in British Columbia, the default scholarly approach is still closed.

It is time for the scholarly conversation to shift from “why open”, to “why not open”?

This event will feature discussion about collaboration within the open movement and role of openness in higher education in British Columbia and examine:

  • if and why BC’s universities and colleges should embrace open practices
  • what impact open access and the reuse of educational materials would have on the cost and efficacy of higher education
  • what role the governments of Canada and British Columbia should play in opening higher education

About the Speakers:

Dr. John Willinksy

Director of the Public Knowledge Project, Khosla Family Professor of Education and Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at Stanford University, Professor in Publishing Studies at Simon Fraser University, and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the SFU Library

John started PKP in 1998 at the University of British Columbia in an effort to create greater public and global access to research and scholarship through the use of new publishing technologies. He is the author of, among other books, Empire of Words: The Reign of the OED (Princeton, 1994); Learning to Divide the World: Education at Empire’s End (Minnesota, 1998); Technologies of Knowing(Beacon 2000); and The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship (MIT Press, 2006).

Dr. Juan Pablo AlperinJuan Pablo is an instructor in Publishing Studies, with research interests in scholarly publishing, and a collaborator on the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University. He is currently involved in several research initiatives aimed at improving the quality, impact, and reach of scholarly publishing in Latin American, and has published numerous articles and edited two books on the subject.

David Ascher – David Ascher is VP of Product for the Mozilla Foundation, and lives in Vancouver, Canada. He’s been working with Mozilla technology since 1999, and is interested in building systems that let new audiences create on the web by providing access to easy to use and engaging authoring experiences on the web.

Inba Kehoe – Inba Kehoe is responsible for Copyright and Scholarly Communications (including publishing) at the University of Victoria. She graduated with an MLS from the University of Toronto in 1993, and has a BA in English and History. She is currently working on a PhD on open scholarship.

Clint LalondeClint Lalonde is an educational technologist and an advocate for the use of open educational resources and open education practices in higher education. Clint has worked in the British Columbia post-secondary system for 20 years, and is currently the Manager of Open Education at BCcampus where he is a project lead on the BC Open Textbook project, working towards providing post-secondary faculty & students with free and openly licensed remixable textbooks.

Dr. Rosemary (Rosie) J. RedfieldRosie is well trained (PhD from Stanford, post-docs at Harvard and Johns Hopkins), though not always well behaved. Since 2006 she’s been writing openly about her day-to-day research on her RRResearch blog, whose tagline reads “Not your typical science blog, but an ‘open science’ research blog. Watch me fumbling my way towards understanding how and why bacteria take up DNA, and getting distracted by other cool questions.” In 2011 she achieved her 15 minutes of fame by critiquing (on RRResearch) the NASA-sponsored paper claiming that bacteria could construct DNA using arsenic instead of phosphorus, and in 2012 she led a team that showed this work to not be reproducible. Lately she’s been criticizing the current teaching of genetics, and putting her money where her mouth is by developing and teaching the Useful Genetics MOOC.

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