The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to co-present

Open for Collaboration: Is it Time for Canada to Implement a Unified Open Strategy for Higher Education?

October 22 2015, 6:30-8:30pm

Room 1430, Harbour Centre (SFU Vancouver)

515 Hastings St, Vancouver

This special event is presented in collaboration with
SFU Library, UBC Library, BCcampus, Public Knowledge Project, and COPPUL as part of Open Access Week.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  To register visit: http://tiny.cc/oaweek15

Update (Oct. 16): Registration for in-person attendance is full, but you can still get on the wait list via the link above, or you can participate online via webcast: http://tiny.cc/oaweeklive

A link to the recorded version of this event will be provided here as soon as it is available.

Embedded within the vision of post-secondary institutions across British Columbia are the values of contributing to knowledge across disciplines and sharing the results of research with the local and global communities.

Spurred by the need to make higher education accessible to all, the open movement has gained ground as the Internet evolved to enable easy sharing of different forms of media. However, while the notion of “open” in higher education has been growing in British Columbia, the default scholarly approach is still closed.

It is time for the scholarly conversation to shift from “why open”, to “why not open”?

This event will feature discussion about collaboration within the open movement and role of openness in higher education in British Columbia and examine:

  • if and why BC’s universities and colleges should embrace open practices
  • what impact open access and the reuse of educational materials would have on the cost and efficacy of higher education
  • what role the governments of Canada and British Columbia should play in opening higher education

About the Speakers:

Dr. John Willinksy

Director of the Public Knowledge Project, Khosla Family Professor of Education and Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at Stanford University, Professor in Publishing Studies at Simon Fraser University, and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the SFU Library

John started PKP in 1998 at the University of British Columbia in an effort to create greater public and global access to research and scholarship through the use of new publishing technologies. He is the author of, among other books, Empire of Words: The Reign of the OED (Princeton, 1994); Learning to Divide the World: Education at Empire’s End (Minnesota, 1998); Technologies of Knowing(Beacon 2000); and The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship (MIT Press, 2006).

Dr. Juan Pablo AlperinJuan Pablo is an instructor in Publishing Studies, with research interests in scholarly publishing, and a collaborator on the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University. He is currently involved in several research initiatives aimed at improving the quality, impact, and reach of scholarly publishing in Latin American, and has published numerous articles and edited two books on the subject.

David Ascher – David Ascher is VP of Product for the Mozilla Foundation, and lives in Vancouver, Canada. He’s been working with Mozilla technology since 1999, and is interested in building systems that let new audiences create on the web by providing access to easy to use and engaging authoring experiences on the web.

Inba Kehoe – Inba Kehoe is responsible for Copyright and Scholarly Communications (including publishing) at the University of Victoria. She graduated with an MLS from the University of Toronto in 1993, and has a BA in English and History. She is currently working on a PhD on open scholarship.

Clint LalondeClint Lalonde is an educational technologist and an advocate for the use of open educational resources and open education practices in higher education. Clint has worked in the British Columbia post-secondary system for 20 years, and is currently the Manager of Open Education at BCcampus where he is a project lead on the BC Open Textbook project, working towards providing post-secondary faculty & students with free and openly licensed remixable textbooks.

Dr. Rosemary (Rosie) J. RedfieldRosie is well trained (PhD from Stanford, post-docs at Harvard and Johns Hopkins), though not always well behaved. Since 2006 she’s been writing openly about her day-to-day research on her RRResearch blog, whose tagline reads “Not your typical science blog, but an ‘open science’ research blog. Watch me fumbling my way towards understanding how and why bacteria take up DNA, and getting distracted by other cool questions.” In 2011 she achieved her 15 minutes of fame by critiquing (on RRResearch) the NASA-sponsored paper claiming that bacteria could construct DNA using arsenic instead of phosphorus, and in 2012 she led a team that showed this work to not be reproducible. Lately she’s been criticizing the current teaching of genetics, and putting her money where her mouth is by developing and teaching the Useful Genetics MOOC.

*UPDATE* PowerPoint presentation now available >here<

Karla Hahn, PhD.

Field Study Findings on Faculty & Researcher Use of New Models of Scholarly Publishing & Communication

Vancouver

Thursday, March 5, 2009, 2:00pm – 4:00pm
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Dodson Room (Rm. 302) University of British Columbia

Victoria

Friday, March 6, 2009, 2:00pm – 4:00pm

University of Victoria, Mearns Centre for Learning, Room 210

In the Spring of 2008, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) engaged Ithaka, a not-for-profit organization promoting innovation in academia, to conduct an investigation into the range of new models of scholarly publishing and communication valued by scholars, with a particular focus on those works that are pushing beyond the boundaries of traditional formats and are considered innovative by the faculty who use them. A field team of 301 librarians at 46 institutions interviewed professors about the digital resources they use.  Among the key findings and works Karla Hahn, Director of the Office of Scholarly Communication at ARL, will describe include:

  • Evidence that innovative digital resources can be found across the humanities, social sciences, and scientific/technical/medical subject areas.
  • Almost every resource cited by faculty operates under some form of peer review or editorial oversight.
  • Some the resources with greatest impact are those that have been around a long while.
  • Many digital publications are capable of running on relatively small budgets and are tailored to small, niche audiences.
  • Innovations relating to multimedia content and Web 2.0 functionality appear in some cases to blur the lines between resource types.
  • Projects of all sizes, especially open access sites and publications, employ a range of support strategies in the search for financial sustainability.

The findings were published in November 2008 and titled: Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication - Results of an Investigation Conducted by Ithaka for the Association of Research Libraries:” http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/current-models-report.pdf

About the Speaker:

Karla Hahn has been the Director of the Office of Scholarly Communication at ARL since May 2005. Key areas of activity for the office include the assessment and implementation of selected new scholarly communication models; the development of alliances to advance new systems of scholarly communication; and advancement of library outreach efforts to inform the educational and research communities on trends, findings, opportunities, and their impact on promotion and tenure, on teaching and research, and on university budgets. Karla holds a PhD from the University of Maryland College of Information Studies, an MLS from Syracuse University, an MS from the University of Chicago, and a BS from Wittenberg University. Her writings include Electronic Ecology: A Case Study of Electronic Journals in Context and numerous articles on issues relating to publishing and electronic communication

BCLRG Lecture Series Coordinators: Joy Kirchner (joy.kirchner@ubc.ca), Kat McGrath (kat.mcgrath@ubc.ca), Don Taylor (dtaylor@sfu.ca), Heather de Forest (hdefores@sfu.ca) or Katy Nelson (katnel@uvic.ca)

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