Above image is courtesy of the International Open Access Week site

 

This year’s 2019 International Open Access Week theme is “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge” as recently announced by the 2019 Open Access Week Advisory Committee

 

The International Open Access Week – happening on October 21-27, 2019 – provides an opportunity for all “to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives”, as per SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition).

 

Building on last year’s theme, “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge,” this year’s theme will focus on answering the following questions:

 

  • Whose interests are being prioritized in the actions we take and in the platforms that we support?

 

  • Whose voices are excluded? Are underrepresented groups included as full partners from the beginning?

 

  • Are we supporting not only open access but also equitable participation in research communication?

 

 

Learn more about open access at UBC and beyond via the following ways:

 

Check out the UBC Library’s Open Access page in the coming months

 

Visit the open.ubc.ca site for more Open Access resources

 

View and download 70 Open Access Week items in cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2017-2018!

 

In 2017-2018, cIRcle reached another milestone of over 60,000 items and saw an increase of its annual growth rate from 8% in previous years to 10%.

 

This report highlights’ include a sampling of cIRcle’s new and ongoing partnerships, its growth and development along with a snapshot of its top content contributors.

 

Two spotlights of cIRcle projects and collections included in the report are the BioMed Central/SpringerOpen project and the noteworthy additions in the UBC President’s Speeches and Writing collection.

 

Explore UBC research in cIRcle, for example, the growing number of preprints and postprints of academic journal articles, conference proceedings, departmental publications, technical reports, course notes, and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year’s International Open Access Week 2018 theme is “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge” as announced by the 2018 Open Access Week Advisory Committee

 

Key highlights will focus on thought-provoking questions about challenges raised as the open access movement and scholarly research system draw closer despite changes in technology, education, funding, governments, publishing and such affecting many stakeholders around the world. This annual event is of keen interest to scholars, libraries, private and public research institutions, and anyone desiring to improve and advance a more equitable open scholarly research system.

 

Examples of anticipated questions surrounding the “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge” theme for 2018 are as follows:

 

How do we ensure sustainability models used for open access are not exclusionary?

What are inequities that open systems can recreate or reinforce?

Whose voices are prioritized? Who is excluded?

How does what counts as scholarship perpetuate bias?

What are areas where openness might not be appropriate?

 

Stay tuned for more news about Open Access Week 2018 and upcoming Open UBC events!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to release the cIRcle Annual Impact & Activity Report 2016-2017!

 

In 2016-2017, cIRcle (UBC’s Digital Repository) had over 56,000 items. In the past two years, cIRcle has archived more than 4,000 deposits per year — an average annual growth rate of 8%.

 

Other highlights included in the report:

  • A breakdown of the increase in faculty content and a quick summary of the top content contributors
  • Developed cIRcle guidelines and practices on improving metadata for greater access and discoverability via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal
  • Featured Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum and UBC alumna, Mary-Lou Florian
  • Spotlight on a few key partnerships and collaborations such as the Vancouver Institute Lecture Series and more

 

A quick sampling of new additions to cIRcle included:

Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59683

Form follows parking : strategies for mitigating the impacts of excess parking supply http://hdl.handle.net/2429/57704

Embedding the Frames of Evidence-Based Practice : Intersections in Librarianship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58260

Research Data Management (RDM) Needs of Science and Engineering Researchers : A View from Canada http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58265

Analyzing Fire Ignition Data in the Kamloops, Lillooet and Merritt fire zones : with implications toward the effects of fire suppression on the landscape http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59241

The landscape of rare cancer : a sea of opportunity http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59312

Interventions to Improve Patient Hand Hygiene : A Systematic Review http://hdl.handle.net/2429/60520

 

And, last but not least by any means, we were thrilled to add the first fourteen items from UBC President Santa Ono and we look forward to adding more this year!

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

At the University of British Columbia (UBC), the ‘highest calibre [of] research faculty and students’ create, innovate and inspire while they work and study at its two campuses located in Vancouver and in the Okanagan Valley. According to UBC 2016/17 figures, it ‘secures approximately $600 million in research funding each year with 199 companies spun off from UBC research; 1,326 research projects with industry partners; and 1,172 research contracts and agreements with government and non-profits’.

 

If you are looking for an openly accessible collection of such published and unpublished scholarly research by the UBC faculty community and its partners, take a moment to learn more about this notable one.

 

The UBC Faculty of Research and Publications collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository showcases all types of content ranging from grant-funded research datasets to text files of preprint and postprint articles, case studies, technical reports, working papers, book reviews, conference proceedings and summaries to audio and video recording files to historical photographs of people, places, and objects.

 

With 3,521 items now and counting, the oldest item found in this collection was published back in 1929. More recently, one of the newest items found in cIRcle was a journal article published just this year by UBC authors from these interdisciplinary areas: Faculty of Arts, Library, Faculty of Medicine, School of Journalism and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

This collection covers a broad range of both historical and current thematic subjects such as air pollution, Canada, community environmental health, forest productivity, genocide, health human resources, HIV, homelessness, medical technology, monuments and memorials, prisoners, war, workplace health, and much more. So far, the latest top country views and downloads originate from the United States, Canada, China, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Republic of Korea, Australia, India, and the Netherlands.

 

Part of this unique collection is the Adam Jones Global Photo Archive created by UBC Okanagan professor Adam Jones, head of International Relations at UBC’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. He is known as a “[g]lobetrotter, acclaimed author, and genocide expert” who has visited more than 103 countries to date.

 

One newly added item garnering media attention this month is a report written by UBC professor and Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Cancer Primary Prevention, Dr. Carolyn Gotay et al. She provides an update on the activities of the Breast Cancer Prevention & Risk Assessment Clinic in British Columbia. So far, it has received 1,369 views from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Iran, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Japan.

 

Another part of this growing collection includes the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Also known as the UBC Learning Exchange, MRAi is a community engagement initiative based in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Did you know that the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is a funding partner and contributor of MRAi? With new items added nearly everyday, there are currently over 150 faculty research articles and other community-sourced historical materials from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which are now openly accessible in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

At the University of British Columbia (UBC), the ‘highest calibre [of] research faculty and students’ create, innovate and inspire while they work and study at its two campuses located in Vancouver and in the Okanagan Valley. According to UBC 2016/17 figures, it ‘secures approximately $600 million in research funding each year with 199 companies spun off from UBC research; 1,326 research projects with industry partners; and 1,172 research contracts and agreements with government and non-profits’.

 

If you are looking for an openly accessible collection of such published and unpublished scholarly research by the UBC faculty community and its partners, take a moment to learn more about this notable one.

 

The UBC Faculty of Research and Publications collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository showcases all types of content ranging from grant-funded research datasets to text files of preprint and postprint articles, case studies, technical reports, working papers, book reviews, conference proceedings and summaries to audio and video recording files to historical photographs of people, places, and objects.

 

With 3,521 items now and counting, the oldest item found in this collection was published back in 1929. More recently, one of the newest items found in cIRcle was a journal article published just this year by UBC authors from these interdisciplinary areas: Faculty of Arts, Library, Faculty of Medicine, School of Journalism and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

This collection covers a broad range of both historical and current thematic subjects such as air pollution, Canada, community environmental health, forest productivity, genocide, health human resources, HIV, homelessness, medical technology, monuments and memorials, prisoners, war, workplace health, and much more. So far, the latest top country views and downloads originate from the United States, Canada, China, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Republic of Korea, Australia, India, and the Netherlands.

 

Part of this unique collection is the Adam Jones Global Photo Archive created by UBC Okanagan professor Adam Jones, head of International Relations at UBC’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. He is known as a “[g]lobetrotter, acclaimed author, and genocide expert” who has visited more than 103 countries to date.

 

One newly added item garnering media attention this month is a report written by UBC professor and Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Cancer Primary Prevention, Dr. Carolyn Gotay et al. She provides an update on the activities of the Breast Cancer Prevention & Risk Assessment Clinic in British Columbia. So far, it has received 1,369 views from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Iran, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Japan.

 

Another part of this growing collection includes the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Also known as the UBC Learning Exchange, MRAi is a community engagement initiative based in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Did you know that the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is a funding partner and contributor of MRAi? With new items added nearly everyday, there are currently over 150 faculty research articles and other community-sourced historical materials from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which are now openly accessible in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

 

Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet