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“International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.” (SPARC)

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Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. This global event, now entering its eighth year, will take place from Oct. 24 – 30, 2016.

 

Join us at one of the many Open Access Week events, either face-to-face or online, at participating B.C. post-secondary institutions.

 

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

 

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

 

Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

 

Above image and text excerpt are courtesy of BCcampus

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cIRcle FAQ of the Day:

Have you wondered, How do I cite an item that I have found in cIRcle?

If so, read on. (If not, still read on and learn something new.)

 

Always cite the published version if available, so the author(s) receives credit through databases that track citation counts (e.g. Thomson Reuter’s Web of Science). Note that the page numbering of the cIRcle version may not correspond to the page numbering in the published version.

However, there may be circumstances where you need to cite the cIRcle version. Even if citing the cIRcle version, cite the published version as well so that the author(s) receive citation recognition, as mentioned. Cite the cIRcle version as follows:

Klinka, K., Varga, P. and Chourmouzis, C. (1999). Towards a quantitative classification of soil nutrient regimes in British Columbia : Comparison of regional studies. cIRcle: UBC’s Digital Repository: Scientia Silvica Extension Series. Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/764.

 

You may well ask, But what if the item is an unpublished work?

To cite an unpublished work, such as a thesis or dissertation in cIRcle, use the same format:

Blackman, M. J. (2008). Achieving economic and social sustainability in the inner city: The role of business improvements districts. cIRcle: UBC’s Digital Repository: Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) 2008+. Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/2445.

The URI is the most important piece of the cIRcle citation, as it is a permanent (a.k.a. persistent) and unique link.

 

Parts of this FAQ adapted from Open Research Online, FAQ at: http://oro.open.ac.uk/help/helpfaq.html#How_should_I_cite_items.

 

Find more cIRcle FAQs here

 

 

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“As Open Access becomes a more and more familiar concept, we must focus on the small steps everyone can take to make openness in research a reality.”

— Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC® (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition)

 

Recently, [i]n conjunction with this year’s Open Access Week Advisory Committee, SPARC [announced that] the theme for this year’s 9th International Open Access Week, to be held October 24-30, will be “Open in Action.”

International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.

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Established by SPARC and partners in the student community in 2008, International Open Access Week is an opportunity to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives. This year’s Open Access Week will be held from October 24th through the 30th; however, those celebrating the week are encouraged to schedule local events whenever is most suitable during the year.

 

Read the entire SPARC announcement here

 

Curious about past Open Access Week events at UBC? Click here

 

Want to find other Open UBC resources? Click here

 

Above excerpt in italics is courtesy of SPARC and above photo is courtesy of JISC

 

 

idea award

UBC Library’s Innovative Dissemination and Engagement Award (IDEA) is now seeking applications.

This annual award, established in 2010, looks at innovative ways of disseminating research knowledge, through the development of tools, enhanced teaching, or making research widely accessible in new ways. Previously dubbed the Innovative Dissemination of Research Award, the IDEA has added community engagement and teaching tools to the award criteria.

A lucky UBC faculty, staff or student researcher will be awarded a framed certificate of recognition and a $2,000 cash prize.

Former recipients include David Ng (pictured below), a professor in UBC’s Michael Smith Labs and Rowan Cockett, a UBC Geophysics student.

image of David Ng

For eligibility, award criteria, or to fill out an application form, visit the Scholarly Communications website.

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