Indigenous Archival Resources Awareness Day

When: Friday, September 20, 1:00-3:30

Where: Rare Books and Special Collections, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

 

Join a team of librarians, archivists, faculty and outreach colleagues for a session that looks at resources available for the research and teaching of Indigenous studies and history at UBC. We will look at resources and services from the Xwi7xwa Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, and digital archives available through the library (both open access and purchased). There will be a chance to get hands on with both physical documents and digitised material such as Indigenous newspapers (please bring laptops with you for the latter). The discussion will include case studies of using the resources in teaching, ideas for using them in future research and instruction, and ethical considerations of using this material.

 

If you’d like to attend, please RSVP to coll.thrush@ubc.ca.

Xwi7xwa Library has a wide range of carefully curated library research guides (also known as libguides), covering everything from Aboriginal Filmmakers to Indigenous Education K-12. These guides are particularly helpful places to start when looking for information about a specific disciple or subject area. Visit the portal to see all Xwi7xwa Library authored libguides.

 

According to the 2018-2019 University of British Columbia Course Calendar and departmental course descriptions, there are 118 courses, from 35 different departments, that have a significant amount of Indigenous content being offered for the Winter 2018-2019 session.

 

You can download the course list here: UBC winter courses with Indigenous content 2018

 

 

Culture at the Centre is new exhibition at the Museum of Anthropology that insight into the “important work Indigenous-run cultural centres and museums in British Columbia are doing to honour and support their culture, history and language. Five centres are showcased, representing six communities: Musqueam Cultural Education Centre (Musqueam), Squamish-Lil’wat Cultural Centre (Squamish, Lil’wat), Heiltsuk Cultural Education Centre (Heiltsuk), Nisg̱a’a Museum (Nisg̱a’a) and Haida Gwaii Museum and Haida Heritage Centre at Kay Llnagaay (Haida).” [MOA]

The exhibition is organized around three main themes: land and language, continuity and communities, and repatriation and reconciliation, and runs until October 8th, 2018. To learn more, visit the Museum of Anthropology website here. 

 

According to the 2018 University of British Columbia Course Calendar and departmental course descriptions, there are 6 courses, from 3 departments, not including First Nations and Indigenous Studies, that contain a significant amount of Indigenous content and are being offered for Summer 2018. These departments are Education, First Nations and Endangered Languages, and History.

Education

EDUC 141 (3) Indigenous Studies (POINT, MARNY)

For students in the Indigenous Teacher Education Program (NITEP) only.

EDUC 440 (3) Aboriginal Education in Canada (multiple sections)

No course description available.

EDUC 442A (1) Critical Issues in Indigenous Education (TBA)

Post-practicum students will explore how a school program may need to be modified in order to integrate more fully First Nations history, content, and worldviews.

 

First Nations Languages

FNEL 480A (3) Endangered Language Documentation and Revitalization (TBA)

Critical study of the historical, social, cultural, political, and economic factors impact on language loss, retention, and revival. Research on and application of methodologies for collaborative, trans-disciplinary, community-based documentation and revitalization of BC’s Indigenous linguistic heritage.

 

History

HIST 326 (3) Canada Since 1945: Affluence and Anxiety in the Atomic Age (Borys, David)

Includes immigration policy; the welfare state; Aboriginal peoples; the Cold War; resource economies and national politics; continentalism and free trade; constitutional crises; conflicting nationalisms; and new social movements. Credit will only be granted for one of HIST 326 or 426, if 426 was taken before 2007W.

HIST 339 (3) The United States, 1945 to the Present: The Limits of Power (Paris, Leslie)

American military and geo-political power during and after Cold War; wars in Korea, Vietnam, and Middle East; domestic issues including McCarthyism, social movements (blacks, women, youth, gays.

You can download the course list here.UBC Courses with Indigenous Content Summer 2018

 

 

From June 22 to 24, 2017, the University of British Columbia and its co-hosts will welcome NAISA, the largest scholarly organization devoted to Indigenous issues and research, to UBC’s Vancouver campus on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam Nation.

Xwi7xwa will host a small lunch and tour for delegates interested in learning more about the library. Please consider registering for this when you register for the conference. We look forward to welcoming you!

Please view the NAISA trailer and conference website for a sneak peak of the host venues, included Xwi7xwa.

 

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