UBC Library presents, in partnership with UBC Forestry and the Simon K. Y. Lee Global Lounge and Resource Centre, a conversation with Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer on Friday, January 29 (1:00 -2:30 p.m. PST). The acclaimed author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants will be joined by moderators, Dr. Daniel Heath Justice and Corrina Sparrow to discuss the author’s influence on multidisciplinary understandings of her work and how readers can integrate this into our connections with land and each other through our respective disciplinary lenses.

Date and time: Friday, January 29 (1:00 -2:30 p.m. PST)

Location: Online

Register now: https://bit.ly/2Li75xO

Have a particular question for the author? Submit your questions here:  https://ubc.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6L7JxLNWciJrmIZ 

Forest (Reads) Initiative Course:

Forest(Reads) is a joint initiative between the Faculty of Forestry’s Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Council and the Associate Dean, Academic of the Faculty. The Initiative has a canvas course that anyone with a UBC affiliation can register in, which can be accessed here (https://canvas.ubc.ca/courses/69762).

The course allows participants access to discussion boards as well as access links for our zoom conversations. Participants in the course will be entered in a book draw in early February for a few copies of Braiding Sweetgrass!

For UBC e-book copies & background bios see here.

Register here! Join us January 19, 2021 from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Xwi7xwa Library’s Research Guides  are a collection of resources gathered to support common questions we receive from patrons. Patterned patron curiosity informs what topics Xwi7xwa’s guides cover but they must also speak to an individual’s relationship to the topic, therefore the scope of perspectives the guides connect to are broad. One of the main goals of our guides are to place Indigenous knowledges, perspectives, and pedagogy at the forefront of beginning to answer researcher curiosity. This session will cover what research guides are, why specific guides have been created, and how we think responsibly about the information we gather and give.

 

 

Xwi7xwa Library is pleased to present our Critical Indigenous Literacy kits for children’s picture books. You can find our kits online by visiting the Critical Indigenous Literacy tab here.

Critical literacy requires us to go beyond what we read on the page and to consider the larger narrative in which a text is situated, asking questions about who created a text and why. Critical Indigenous literacy asks us to think about authorship and identity in relation to the stories and teachings we trust as readers. It also asks readers to think critically about Indigenous representations (or lack thereof) within a text.

We would like to acknowledge that this work would not be possible without: Emily Fornwald, Stephanie Marston, and Wendy Traas from the UBC Education Library; Sajni Lacey from the UBC Okanagan Library; and Natalie Trapuzzano Lindsey Bennett the student librarians that assisted us.

Creative Commons Licence
Critical Indigenous Literacy for Children’s Picture Books by Xwi7xwa Library is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

As we come to the end of Indigenous Peoples’ History Month, Technical Services and Xwi7xwa Library are pleased to announce a recent step undertaken in the Library’s effort to decolonize Indigenous subject headings. You may have noticed that many thousands of Xwi7xwa records previously containing the term “First Nations” now use the broader heading Aboriginal Canadians. For many years, Xwi7xwa Library’s own thesaurus has rejected the LCSH term “Indians of North America” in favour of local alternatives. As Sarah Dupont, Head of Xwi7xwa Library states, “When Aboriginal Peoples go looking to find representations of our many diverse knowledges in the Library collections, we should be able to search using terms we use to describe ourselves. We should not feel the sting of antiquated, colonial, and racist words that perpetuate negative connotations of us, especially when we and our Allies go to do the work of lifting academia and broader society out of these shadows through our scholarly efforts.” Adolfo Tarango, Head of Technical Services, adds, “While we know terminology that attempts to group Aboriginal Canadians is fraught with problems of historic, contextual, and personal challenges, new words to both represent them as a group and replace the most prevalent, problematic phrase Indians of North America were needed to signal a shift in how we think about our roles as professionals in the continued mis-treatment of ‘othered’ peoples.” Sue Andrews, Principle Cataloguer, adds, “Our choice of the new phrase, Aboriginal Canadians, has helped us to correct earlier interpretations and uses of the term “First Nations” in our records, and to instead provide a term that is more inclusive of the different groups that represent our rich heritage of First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples in Canada. By selecting a term used widely in Canadian contexts by Aboriginal Canadians themselves we uphold our principle of “cultural warrant” for our choices of terms in our FNHL thesaurus.”

We commit to being responsive to changing this term as needed, and look to our First Nations, Métis, and Inuit colleagues to advise us along this journey. Congratulations, Xwi7xwa and Technical Services!

The Indigenous Music & Dance Research Guide provides strategies and information for researchers searching for Indigenous artists, dance and music performances. It provides resources like books to begin research from, search terms, music and dance videos, current news, ways to find Indigenous artists on websites like Youtube, and a list of local BC artists to add to your music playlists.

The Browse by Genre page has a short list of Indigenous artists sorted into different genres. If you know of an artist that should be on our list, email us and we’ll add it!

Happy listening!

This research guide is intended for students, faculty, and researchers to use and locate resources to help their understanding of the complexities surrounding Indigenous spatial and land based activism. It focuses specifically on strategies for researching contemporary Indigenous struggles over spatial justice. Because grassroots struggles for justice are not always well represented within academic literature, this guide provides additional research strategies, including tips for navigating news and social media.

Some highlights from the new guide includes:

And more lists of books, theses, scholarly articles and other helpful resources on this topic!

Please feel free to email us any feedback on the new research guide or any questions about this topic to xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca

Our Distance Research Guide is intended for UBC students, faculty, staff, and researchers who have been impacted by the recent changes in services due to global health concerns. It has updates, information on getting your devices connected to UBC services, and tips and tricks for researching Indigenous topics remotely.

View our other research guides here.

Our staff are working from home and are available through email at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca to:

  • answer research questions
  • find online materials for papers & research topics
  • find alternative materials to items only available in print
  • cancel late fees from March 16 until the situation changes

Did you know that UBC Library has thousands of full online copies of their most popular books? At Xwi7xwa, we have some of the most popular/circulating materials available online for students & faculty to access, as well as streaming videos through McIntyre Media.

If you need help finding resources or alternative resources to a print materials you can’t access right now, please email us at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca and a librarian will email you back with some options!

How to Find Online Materials through the catalog:

Option 1:

Through this link to the UBC Library catalogue, you can search specifically for materials that are available online. The image below is where the link will take you.

Under the “Filter by Date/Location/Format/Language,” select “Location: Online” to view items that will be available in their full format online. You can type in a specific title, keywords, authors, or subjects and see what comes up.

Option 2:

A way to view if a specific material that the Library owns in print is also available online by clicking on the title in the item record.

In the above example, you can see the title is printed twice. Click on the second title listed; this one is a clickable link.

Clicking on the title will lead you to a page much like the one above. There are three types of records: a record of the book at Xwi7xwa, at other UBC library locations, and the copy available online. Click on the option that says “Status, Library Location: ONLINE”

Either option will lead you to a page like the example in the below image:

Once here, select the orange “Online Access” button on the right side of the screen. This will take you to the online ebook.

Helpful Hints for Keyword Searches through Summon

  • Use quotation marks to search for a phrase.
    • Example: “First Nations”
  • Use a question mark to truncate a term to search for words with the same stem.
    • Example: Aborig? retrieves Aboriginal, Aboriginals, Aborigine, etc.
  • Use “AND” in searches will allow you to limit your results even farther.
    • example: “first nations” AND “residential schools” will only show you results with both those phrases in them. This works for more than just two as well
  • Use “OR” to find phrases that could be interchangeable to make the search wider
    • example: “first nations” OR “indigenous” OR “aboriginal”
  • Combine “AND” and “OR”
    • example: “first nations” OR “indigenous” OR “aboriginal” AND “residential schools”

How to Find Streaming Videos:

Option 1:

UBC Library uses a platform called McIntyre Media to stream videos we’ve subscribed to.

  1. Search the phrase “Mcintyre media” in simple search and filter the results to Online OR click this link.
  2. Select any of the titles on the list to see their record.
  3. Under Actions on the right hand side click Online to gain access to 165 titles

Check out this post from Xwi7xwa last year for some video recommendations.

Option 2:

Head onto the simple search of the catalogue and the page below will pop up

Under “Filter by Date/Location/Format/Language,”select “Location: ONLINE'” and put in your search term(s).

Once you are taken to your search results, you will want to add an additional filter from the left side column.

Add the filter “Format: Videorecording” to be able to view online videos. Some of these will be from McIntyre Media, but some will not. It depends on what search terms were used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Option 3: 

UBC Library has a research guide all about online film and media that you can access.

Looking for non-academic films to take your mind off your coursework? Check out this database UBC has access to until April 20th!

Featured Online Books & Resources:

As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (also available online) gives the reader many of the ways that Indigenous resistance has stopped natural resource extraction. From tar sands to pipelines, Indigenous resistance has pushed against colonization and the dispossession of land. This book not only examines the relationship between Indigenous peoples and natural resources, but ways to push back against settler-colonialism as a whole.

Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples by Linda Tuhiwai Smith explores the ways in which imperils is embedded in the disciplines of knowledge, and argues that the decolonization of research methods will help reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style by Lee Maracle is a collection of short stories provides revealing glimpses into the life experiences of an Aboriginal woman, a university professor, an activist and a single mother in the lower mainland of B.C.

Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask by Anton Treuer uses matter-of-fact responses to over 120 questions, both thoughtful and outrageous, modern and historical, Ojibwe scholar and cultural preservationist Anton Treuer gives a frank, funny, and sometimes personal tour of “what’s up with Indians, anyway?”

C̓äsna7äm, The City Before The City directed and produced by Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (also available online) looks at the story of the land UBC and Vancouver sits on before it became Vancouver and UBC. This documentary specifically looks at the 200 day vigil the Musqueam people to halt a condo development that unearthed ancestral remains.

Need more help finding resources? Email us at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca!

Date, time & location: Thu, Jan 23, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Xwi7xwa Library, Seminar Room (Rm 206)

 

Details: Confused about citing references or just need a refresher? If so, then this free workshop is for you. Xwi7xwa Library is offering Citation Basics Workshop, where participants will learn the fundamentals of formatting in-text citations and references/bibliography lists in APA, MLA and Chicago styles for class assignments and papers. We’ll also cover how to cite Elders and Knowledge Keepers. You’ll get a citation resources guide at the end of the session. No previous knowledge of citing is necessary and all levels of technology skills will be happily accommodated. Please contact us at (604) 822-8738 or xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca with any questions.

 

Registration: Registration is not required, but is appreciated. Register using this link: https://forms.gle/5htTyrqJbR63KbhTA

Indigenous Archival Resources Awareness Day

When: Tuesday, January 21, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: Rare Books and Special Collections, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

Join a team of librarians, archivists, faculty, and outreach colleagues for a session to explore resources available for the research and teaching of Indigenous studies and history at UBC. Participants will learn about resources and services at the Xwi7xwa Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, and beyond, and will have a chance to get hands on with physical resources available through UBC Library. The discussion will include case studies of using the resources in teaching, ideas for using them in future research and instruction, and ethical considerations of using this material.

If you’d like to attend, please RSVP to chelsea.shriver@ubc.ca<mailto:chelsea.shriver@ubc.ca 

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