Are you a new UBC faculty member? Attend the next Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC

 

The Office of the Vice-President, Research & Innovation, and SPARC office invite you to attend a Faculty Town Hall with SSHRC.

 

Hear about the latest information and resources available regarding the SSHRC funded programs as well as its future plans.

 

SPEAKER: Tim Wilson, Executive Director, SSHRC Research Grants and Partnerships

WHEN: 2pm-3:30pm on Tuesday, April 10, 2018

WHERE: Michael Smith Labs, room 102

 

Register here

 

Above text is courtesy of SPARC

 

 

 

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Prepping for UBC 3MT 2018?

 

Working on a slide presentation for a spring/summer conference or other event?

 

Interested in open access? Curious about scholarly publishing? Confused about copyright, author rights and more?

 

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, this free UBC graduate workshop is for you!

 

Showcasing your Graduate Research

in UBC’s Open Access Digital Repository:

Help with Copyright and More (Graduate Pathways to Success)

 

presented by the cIRcle Office and Scholarly Communications and Copyright Services

 

Date: Tuesday, 06 February 2018

Time: 12:30 to 14:00

Location: Thea Koerner House, 6371 Crescent Road

 

Participants will learn to:

 

  • Describe and format their work for deposit in cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository
  • See how to apply Creative Commons Licenses to their work
  • Create presentations with good Copyright practices
  • Consult one-on-one with a member of Copyright Services at UBC

 

Register here

 

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Prepping for UBC 3MT 2018?

 

Working on a slide presentation for a spring/summer conference or other event?

 

Interested in open access? Curious about scholarly publishing? Confused about copyright, author rights and more?

 

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, this free UBC graduate workshop is for you!

 

Showcasing your Graduate Research

in UBC’s Open Access Digital Repository:

Help with Copyright and More (Graduate Pathways to Success)

 

presented by the cIRcle Office and Scholarly Communications and Copyright Services

 

Date: Tuesday, 06 February 2018

Time: 12:30 to 14:00

Location: Thea Koerner House, 6371 Crescent Road

 

Participants will learn to:

 

  • Describe and format their work for deposit in cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository
  • See how to apply Creative Commons Licenses to their work
  • Create presentations with good Copyright practices
  • Consult one-on-one with a member of Copyright Services at UBC

 

Register here

 

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

News Release from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC):

 

Research is at the heart of understanding the challenges and opportunities people face in areas such as education, immigration and technology. That’s why the Government of Canada continues to support the work of our country’s social scientists and humanities researchers. The evidence they produce informs policies that improve our understanding of each other and our communities.

To support their efforts, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced today more than $265 million in funding for over 3,300 social sciences and humanities research projects across Canada.

 

The funding is being awarded through scholarships, fellowships, and grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), one of the three federal granting councils responsible for supporting researchers whose work helps fuel a stronger economy, healthy communities and a growing middle class.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the Award Recipients‘ list

 

 

Explore UBC’s Tri-Agency Open Access Policy here

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News Release from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC):

 

Research is at the heart of understanding the challenges and opportunities people face in areas such as education, immigration and technology. That’s why the Government of Canada continues to support the work of our country’s social scientists and humanities researchers. The evidence they produce informs policies that improve our understanding of each other and our communities.

To support their efforts, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced today more than $265 million in funding for over 3,300 social sciences and humanities research projects across Canada.

 

The funding is being awarded through scholarships, fellowships, and grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), one of the three federal granting councils responsible for supporting researchers whose work helps fuel a stronger economy, healthy communities and a growing middle class.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the Award Recipients‘ list

 

 

Explore UBC’s Tri-Agency Open Access Policy here

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: cIRcle Graduate Non-Thesis Research Submission Workflow Overview

 

The GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a lottery based award held twice a year for graduate students at UBC Vancouver which went live on July 9, 2012.

Graduate students were eligible to submit exemplary non-thesis manuscripts or projects related to graduate coursework to the GSS (Graduate Student Society) cIRcle Open Scholar Award, with approval from their course instructors.

A random selection was made from items submitted to cIRcle during the previous 6 month period – four awards will be made per annum, two in April and two in October.

The GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award was a five-year (2012-2017) collaboration of the Graduate Student Society and cIRcle/UBC Library.

The first two awards were presented on October 18, 2012 and the last few awards were presented before the Award ended on May 1, 2017.

Congratulations to the 2016 & 2017 Award winners – Victor Ngo and Ali Hosseini* (April 2016); Jean-Paul Andre Joseph Benoit and Amy Myring (October 2016); and, Keilee Mok and Alejandra Echeverri** (April 2017)!

* Note: Co-authors are faculty members and were not eligible for the award.
** Note: Co authors had graduated prior to the award period and were, therefore, ineligible.

 

Over the course of its five-year term, the Award was presented to the randomly-selected UBC graduate students for their exemplary non-thesis research work in either traditional and/or interdisciplinary fields of study:

  • Civil Engineering
  • Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies (CENES)
  • Community and Regional Planning (SCARP)
  • Computer Science
  • Educational Studies
  • Forest Resources Management
  • Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS)
  • Medicine
  • Nursing
  • Resources, Environment and Sustainability (IRES)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Theatre and Film

“I am grateful for the efforts of those responsible for cIRcle

because I see it as a positive alternative that facilitates sharing of research and work.

cIRcle catalyzes the sharing and building of ideas, motivating students to

improve their work and to give back to the research community that provides so much for them.”

 

    – Robert DeAbreu, GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award Winner, April 2013

 

While the Award officially ended on 1 May 2017, the Award collection was aptly renamed and became the new UBC Graduate Research collection in cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository which now incorporates exemplary non-thesis research work from UBC Okanagan graduate students too. Hooray!

 

The UBC Graduate Research collection welcomes exemplary graduate student non-thesis research such as the following:

  • Essays or papers
  • Graduating papers or projects (Capstone, etc.)
  • Manuscripts
  • Presentations (including research posters)
  • Publisher-permitted versions of journal articles, conference papers, etc. based on course-related research
  • Software code
  • Technical reports
  • Video and audio based projects

 

With too many benefits to list, below are just a sampling of such when making your UBC graduate student non-thesis research openly accessible via cIRcle:

  • Create/enhance your academic and professional scholarly profile
  • Track views and downloads from cities and countries around the world
  • Openly disseminate your UBC research with scholars locally and globally
  • Your work is regularly indexed by web search engines (Google, Google Scholar, etc.)
  • Preserve your UBC scholarly legacy with a DOI (persistent link)

 

UBC graduate students are encouraged to upload their own work (subject to course instructor or supervisor approval) to the UBC Graduate Research collection anytime.

 

 

 

 

 

There is excitement among researchers both nationally and internationally on the recent U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ statement. Why? It focuses on sustainable publishing.

 

As a collaborative body of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities, the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities’ works to “foster the development and delivery of long-term, sustainable higher education and research policy, in Canada and around the world”.  These Canadian universities are “home to world-class researchers using state-of-the-art research infrastructure to make ground-breaking discoveries” as they “train tomorrow’s citizens, entrepreneurs and leaders, and work with partners from the public, private and government sectors to mobilize knowledge and capitalize on it”.

 

The message by Suzanne Corbeil, U15 Executive Director, states in part that “[w]e know investing in research and science pays dividends for all Canadians. It spurs innovation and fosters the curiosity and creativity that our best and brightest minds direct towards solving society’s greatest challenges. It also enables us to ensure we are developing the best and brightest talent for the workforce of tomorrow, and are able to conduct research in world-class facilities that can drive growth of innovative companies.“

 

In its preamble, the U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing emphasizes that, “Access to research and scholarly outputs is essential for scientific discovery, innovation, and education. To maximize knowledge transfer and impact, our researchers’ work must be made readily available around the globe. Research-intensive universities also require timely and continuing access to international research results and scholarship in order to advance and disseminate knowledge, and to develop the next generation of researchers.”

 

The five key principles and their highlights found in the U15 statement are briefly listed directly below:

 

  1. Open Access – a necessity for an accessible and sustainable model of scholarly publishing
  2. Public Interest – disseminating scholarly publications and other research outputs as widely as possible
  3. Quality – rigorous peer review processes and effective research impact measures in all forms of academic publishing
  4. Accountability – highest possible proportion of public dollars invested in research and education
  5. Innovation – collaborative development of new models of scholarly communications benefit the academy and the public in the digital age

 

Download the full U15 Statement on Sustainable Publishing here

 

Explore Open Access and more at UBC

 

Browse UBC’s digital repository for research and teaching materials

 

 

Above logo is courtesy of U15

 

 

olh-logoblue-large-1024x271

 

“The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.” (Open Library of Humanities)

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

We are extremely pleased to announce that the University of British Columbia Library has joined the Open Library of Humanities’ Library Partnership Subsidy system. UBC consistently ranks as one of the world’s top research universities. Globally connected, UBC attracts the highest calibre of research faculty and students and more than $500 million in research funding each year.

 

The Open Library of Humanities is an academic-led, gold open-access publisher with no author-facing charges. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the platform covers its costs by payments from an international library consortium, rather than any kind of author fee.

 

Professor Martin Paul Eve, a founder and academic project director of the OLH, welcomed the University of British Columbia Library: “It is really fantastic to have UBC as a supporter of the OLH model for open access in the humanities. It is clear that OA has benefits for all disciplines. The challenge has been in finding a model that can support OA outside of the natural sciences. With the help of institutions such as the University of British Columbia, we will continue to expand the OLH’s efforts.”

 

Full OLH news release here

 

Above image and text excerpt are courtesy of OLH

 

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Open data (scrabble) (Photo credit: justgrimes under this Creative Commons License)

 

High-quality data management is fundamental to research excellence. The ability to store, access, reuse and build upon digital data is critical to the advancement of research, supports innovative solutions to economic and social challenges, and holds tremendous potential for improvements in quality of life nationally and internationally.

 

As a step in this process, the agencies have developed the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management (the Statement). This builds on the 2013 consultation document, Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada, information provided by a Comprehensive Brief on Research Data Management Policies, and advice received through stakeholder engagement. The agencies sought feedback from the research community in summer 2015 on a draft version of the Statement.

 

The Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management outlines the agencies’ overarching expectations with regard to digital research data management, and the responsibilities of researchers, research communities, institutions and funders in meeting these expectations. It complements and builds upon existing agency policies, and will serve as a guide to assist the research community in preparing for, and contributing to the development of, Tri-Agency data management requirements. The HTML version is accessible here, and the PDF version is accessible here.

 

Read the full press release here

 

See The Tri-Agency Open Access Policy: How the UBC Library Can Help guide for UBC researchers

 

 

8016172703_918813b448_z

Open data (scrabble) (Photo credit: justgrimes under this Creative Commons License)

 

High-quality data management is fundamental to research excellence. The ability to store, access, reuse and build upon digital data is critical to the advancement of research, supports innovative solutions to economic and social challenges, and holds tremendous potential for improvements in quality of life nationally and internationally.

 

As a step in this process, the agencies have developed the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management (the Statement). This builds on the 2013 consultation document, Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada, information provided by a Comprehensive Brief on Research Data Management Policies, and advice received through stakeholder engagement. The agencies sought feedback from the research community in summer 2015 on a draft version of the Statement.

 

The Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management outlines the agencies’ overarching expectations with regard to digital research data management, and the responsibilities of researchers, research communities, institutions and funders in meeting these expectations. It complements and builds upon existing agency policies, and will serve as a guide to assist the research community in preparing for, and contributing to the development of, Tri-Agency data management requirements. The HTML version is accessible here, and the PDF version is accessible here.

 

Read the full press release here

 

See The Tri-Agency Open Access Policy: How the UBC Library Can Help guide for UBC researchers

 

 

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