“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).

Library_Wordle

 

Scholarship by academic librarians advances the fields of library and information science, influences practices of aligned professions, and informs effective advocacy. In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible. The author should be responsible for determining at what date the deposited manuscript becomes openly accessible, taking into account applicable institutional or funder policies, as well as other relevant considerations. ACRL further encourages academic librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature, and data, openly accessible.

 

It is also imperative that publishers of library and information science scholarship explore and implement publishing models to make their content openly accessible as soon as possible. Librarians who are editors, reviewers, and authors should assist with this effort by engaging with their publishers about these models.

 

Read the full press release here

 

Find UBC Library research help here

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

Above image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license

Library_Wordle

 

Scholarship by academic librarians advances the fields of library and information science, influences practices of aligned professions, and informs effective advocacy. In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible. The author should be responsible for determining at what date the deposited manuscript becomes openly accessible, taking into account applicable institutional or funder policies, as well as other relevant considerations. ACRL further encourages academic librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature, and data, openly accessible.

 

It is also imperative that publishers of library and information science scholarship explore and implement publishing models to make their content openly accessible as soon as possible. Librarians who are editors, reviewers, and authors should assist with this effort by engaging with their publishers about these models.

 

Read the full press release here

 

Find UBC Library research help here

 

Want to make your UBC research openly accessible? Visit cIRcle

 

Above image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license

The BC Research Libraries Group (BCRLG)

The BCRLG is a ‘partnership with SFU, UVic, UBC and UNBC to program a Speaker Series that supports scholarship, fosters learning and brings awareness to our respective communities on emerging issues in the information landscape‘. The next BC Research Libraries Group Lecture Series’ event will be happening on Wednesday, June 27th in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at the University of British Columbia. The BCRLG is proud to present the following two speakers:

Caroline Haythornthwaite, Director, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies at the University of British Columbia

AND

Louise SpiteriDirector of the School of Information Management, Dalhousie University

“Libraries and library roles are undergoing rapid transformation in the 21stcentury. In the face of such enormous change, some libraries are choosing non-library trained professionals to fill key new roles. Others are looking to non-library professional programs to help train library professionals in new roles. While others are demanding library education change immediately to meet the demands for new skill sets required for new library positions. Two innovative esteemed Canadian Library School Directors will speak to the many challenges facing library and information professional programs in preparing library and information professionals for 21st century roles.”

To register for this free event and learn more about the speakers, be sure to visit the BCRLG website at: http://blogs.ubc.ca/bcrlglectures/2012/06/11/breathing-new-life-into-the-profession-lis-education-in-the-21st-century/.

Did you know?

The School of Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS) has a cIRcle community at: https://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/588 with these three collections: SLAIS FacultySLAIS Research Days, and SLAIS Students. The top item in the SLAIS cIRcle community is entitled, “What is user engagement? A conceptual framework for defining user engagement with technology”. It has been viewed from countries such as Australia, Brazil, Germany, Indonesia, and others. Take a moment to view it in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/24466 today.

Above image and partial excerpt in italics are courtesy of the BCRLG blog site at: http://blogs.ubc.ca/bcrlglectures/.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet