On 9 March 2018, the 8th annual iSchool@UBC Research Day will be celebrating and showcasing its faculty and student research at UBC.

 

Each year, the iSchool hosts a Research Day, where students and faculty across all of the programs within the School showcase their research in the form of posters, talks and demonstrations. iSchool faculty are provincially, nationally and internationally recognized for their contributions and leadership in Library, Archival and Information Studies research.

 

By providing students with the opportunity to be directly involved in faculty research, the School seeks to enrich the overall quality of the educational experience. As well, students are encouraged to work independently on research projects that reflect their own interests and career goals. By expanding research opportunities and experiences for all students as they prepare them for their future roles as professional and academic leaders in the information professions. Research Day showcases the contributions of iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

 

 

View the event schedule here

 

Download the event poster (PDF)

 

 

Browse some examples of iSchool@UBC research already in cIRcle:

 

Human-centered information organization in online bookstores
Open access journals support in Canada: pan-Canadian bilingual survey of university libraries & presses Spring 2010 : selected results
Taking Shape: Knowledge as Museum Display
“The Participedia Project: Using an Open Source Platform to Mobilize Knowledge about Democratic Innovations”
Trusting Digital Preservation Services: Motives and Means of the Public Sector

 

Click here to access/download more iSchool@UBC research and stay tuned for more items coming soon!

 

 

 

Above excerpt text and image is courtesy of iSchool@UBC

 

 

 

 

The iSchool at UBC (School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies) invites guest speakers to participate in the Colloquia Series. These events are open to the public, and are of interest to faculty, current students, alumni, and other professionals and researchers in the community.

The faculty contacts for the Colloquia Colloquia Series are Dr. Aaron Loehrlein and Dr. Heather O’Brien.

Research Day 2016: Keynote Speech

Friday, March 11, 11:00am-12:00pm

The Curator and Copyright

How does it happen that a practicing archivist, fully happy with the normal archival tasks of accessioning, describing, preserving, and making available archival collections, ends up spending most of his time thinking about copyright?  This talk will highlight three areas that seem core to the archival mission but that are also shaped by copyright.  Archivists can use new technologies to increase access to holdings, license access to content from the repository, and preserve born-digital objects.  Yet there is a copyright component to all these activities.  Understanding that component and how to minimize the risk that it poses should be part of the archivist’s toolkit. 

Speaker bio

Peter Hirtle, Affiliate Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University

Until his retirement from Cornell in 2015, he served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Cornell University Library with a special mandate to address intellectual property issues.  Previously at Cornell, Hirtle served as Director of the Cornell Institute for Digital Collections and as the Associate Editor of D-Lib Magazine.  He is an archivist by training with an MA in History from Johns Hopkins and an MLS with a concentration in archival science from the University of Maryland.  Hirtle is a Fellow and Past President of the Society of American Archivists and is a member of its Working Group on Intellectual Property.  He was a member of the Commission on Preservation and Access/Research Library Group’s Task Force on Digital Archiving and the Copyright Office’s Section 108 Study Group, and is a contributing author to the LibraryLaw.com blog.

“We Feel Fine”: Big Data Observations about State Institutions and Social Inclusion
Dr. Victoria L. Lemieux, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia (on leave) and Senior Public Sector Specialist, The World Bank

Event Details

Abstract of the Talk: On December 17th, 2010, a Tunisian fruit vendor named Mohammed Bouazizi took a can of gasoline and set himself on fire in front of the local governor’s office. Bouazizi’s actions resulted from having his fruit cart confiscated by local police and his frustration at not obtaining an audience with the local governor; his death is said to have sparked what we now know as the “Arab Spring.” The events leading up to and during the Arab Spring raise questions of what causes citizens to protest against their governments? Theorists from different disciplines have put forward many explanations of such events but in this project, Dr. Lemieux discusses her work leading an international research team investigating the relationship between social protest and citizen trust. Though motivated by the Arab Spring, the study focuses on protests during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Football Event that took place in Brazil from 12 June – 13 July 2014. The study is an exploratory one in which the team has drawn upon public administration and political science literature relating to trust in government, as well as from literature on social protest theory from social psychology and sociology. Operationalizing the construct of trust in the study as a measure of the sentiment expressed in the content of twitter data, the team built a tool for and conducted a visual analysis of sentiment classified Twitter data to derive insights about the following research questions: 1) how did citizens feel about their state institutions around the time of the protests, 2) how did these feelings connect to their sentiments about Brazilian Federal and State Government and politicians and 3) how did such sentiments translate into collective behaviours? The results of the study reveal that the 2014 World Cup protests in Brazil sprang from a wide range of grievances coupled with a relative sense of deprivation compared with emergent comparative ‘standards’.  This sense of grievance gave rise to sentiments that activated online protest and may have led to other forms of social protest, such as street demonstrations.

Biography of the Speaker: Dr. Victoria Lemieux is a Senior Public Sector Specialist (Information Management) and an Associate Professor of Archival Studies at the University of British Columbia (on leave). She has held positions as a professional archivist, records manager and risk manager within the public sector and private sectors, and in higher education as an administrator and educator. She has also consulted previously for the United Nations, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the World Bank. Her current research is focused on risk to the availability of trustworthy records, in particular in financial contexts, and how these risks impact upon transparency, financial stability, public accountability and human rights. She holds a doctorate from University College London (Archival Studies, 2002), which focused on the information-related causes of the Jamaican Banking Crisis and, since 2005, has been a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP). She is also the winner of the 2015 Emmett Leahy Award which recognizes an individual whose contributions and accomplishments have had a major impact on the records and information management profession.

 

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