Advancing Open is a highly anticipated event happening at the Simon Fraser University (SFU) downtown campus located in Vancouver, British Columbia on May 6th and May 7th, 2019.

 

This upcoming event is being organized by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries’ (CARL) Open Repositories Working Group (and led by its Community-Building and Engagement Task Group).

 

It is an opportunity for all Canadian academic library scholarly communication practitioners and its community to gather, share and exchange ideas about new strategies, methods and resources across a variety of different avenues in order to advance open access and foster open scholarship throughout Canada.

 

Read the full announcement for more details

 

Explore Open Access at UBC

 

Discover Open Scholarship at UBC

 

Learn more about cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In celebration of open access and its global impact for over a decade, UBC and SFU will be participating in the 2018 International Open Access Week event during October 22-28, 2018.

 

Throughout UBC’s 2018 Open Access Week event, scholars will showcase and discuss their innovative research, teaching and learning skills and experiences while inspiring others to learn more and get involved with the global open access movement. These events will highlight the various opportunities and pathways enabling open scholarship for researchers at UBC and beyond.

 

Similar to past UBC Open Access Week events, this year will include free lectures, workshops, a panel discussion with a Q&A session, seminars, and symposia for students, faculty, staff, and the general public. Topical and timely issues will include the following ones to list just a few:

 

  • new challenges faced by practitioners and stakeholders
  • developing a scholarly/publishing profile
  • applying Creative Commons licenses to your work
  • navigating the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy (NSERC, SSHRC and CIHR)
  • discovering Open Educational Resources (OER)

 

Visit Open UBC to register and attend these free events

 

Learn more about Open Access at UBC

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of SPARC

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

 

BCcampus, BCIT, SFU, UBC CTLT and UBC Library celebrate International Open Access Week 2017

A BC collaborative event, in celebration of this global movement now in its 10th year, will be happening at BCIT’s downtown campus location tonight.

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Learn more

 

Explore Open Access Week at UBC

 

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Building a Sustainable Knowledge Commons – COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories)

COAR just released an animated infographic highlighting the five prerequisites for a sustainable knowledge commons

 

About COAR

An international association comprised of 100+ global members and partners (representing libraries, universities, research institutions, government funders and others) aims to build a sustainable, global knowledge commons based on a network of open access digital repositories.

 

Download the PDF

 

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Examples of open access in action

 

What concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available?

 

Check out SPARC’s new site highlighting 16 examples of the concrete benefits of making research open.

 

Learn more

 

About SPARC

A global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education.

 

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Open access: six myths to put to rest

What are the six most common misconceptions about open access?

Test your knowledge courtesy of Peter Suber (Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and author of Open Access (MIT Press, 2012).

 

Myths:

  • The only way to provide open access to peer-reviewed journal articles is to publish in open access journals
  • All or most open access journals charge publication fees
  • Most author-side fees are paid by the authors themselves
  • Publishing in a conventional journal closes the door on making the same work open access
  • Open access journals are intrinsically low in quality
  • Open access mandates infringe academic freedom

 

Uncover the facts here

 

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Open Access at the Natural History Museum, London

In 2017, the Natural History Museum in London signed the International Open Data Accord (joining the growing number of museums) in publishing their collection databases and digital reproductions online. This undertaking is “part of its five-year plan to build a Museum for the future” by combining the expertise and skills from museum scientists, librarians, and archivists to create and digitize electronic records, making them openly accessible to all. So far, there are 3.8 million specimens already digitized and accessible via the Museum’s Data Portal comprised of the Museum’s research and collections data.

 

Learn more

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of SPARC

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

 

BCcampus, BCIT, SFU, UBC CTLT and UBC Library celebrate International Open Access Week 2017

A BC collaborative event, in celebration of this global movement now in its 10th year, will be happening at BCIT’s downtown campus location tonight.

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Learn more

 

Explore Open Access Week at UBC

 

______

 

Building a Sustainable Knowledge Commons – COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories)

COAR just released an animated infographic highlighting the five prerequisites for a sustainable knowledge commons

 

About COAR

An international association comprised of 100+ global members and partners (representing libraries, universities, research institutions, government funders and others) aims to build a sustainable, global knowledge commons based on a network of open access digital repositories.

 

Download the PDF

 

______

 

Examples of open access in action

 

What concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available?

 

Check out SPARC’s new site highlighting 16 examples of the concrete benefits of making research open.

 

Learn more

 

About SPARC

A global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education.

 

______

 

Open access: six myths to put to rest

What are the six most common misconceptions about open access?

Test your knowledge courtesy of Peter Suber (Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and author of Open Access (MIT Press, 2012).

 

Myths:

  • The only way to provide open access to peer-reviewed journal articles is to publish in open access journals
  • All or most open access journals charge publication fees
  • Most author-side fees are paid by the authors themselves
  • Publishing in a conventional journal closes the door on making the same work open access
  • Open access journals are intrinsically low in quality
  • Open access mandates infringe academic freedom

 

Uncover the facts here

 

______

 

Open Access at the Natural History Museum, London

In 2017, the Natural History Museum in London signed the International Open Data Accord (joining the growing number of museums) in publishing their collection databases and digital reproductions online. This undertaking is “part of its five-year plan to build a Museum for the future” by combining the expertise and skills from museum scientists, librarians, and archivists to create and digitize electronic records, making them openly accessible to all. So far, there are 3.8 million specimens already digitized and accessible via the Museum’s Data Portal comprised of the Museum’s research and collections data.

 

Learn more

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

 

Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

16x24oaweekposter2016-600x900

 

“International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.” (SPARC)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. This global event, now entering its eighth year, will take place from Oct. 24 – 30, 2016.

 

Join us at one of the many Open Access Week events, either face-to-face or online, at participating B.C. post-secondary institutions.

 

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

 

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

 

Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

 

Above image and text excerpt are courtesy of BCcampus

The BC Research Libraries Group (BCRLG)

The BCRLG is a ‘partnership with SFU, UVic, UBC and UNBC to program a Speaker Series that supports scholarship, fosters learning and brings awareness to our respective communities on emerging issues in the information landscape‘. The next BC Research Libraries Group Lecture Series’ event will be happening on Wednesday, June 27th in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at the University of British Columbia. The BCRLG is proud to present the following two speakers:

Caroline Haythornthwaite, Director, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies at the University of British Columbia

AND

Louise SpiteriDirector of the School of Information Management, Dalhousie University

“Libraries and library roles are undergoing rapid transformation in the 21stcentury. In the face of such enormous change, some libraries are choosing non-library trained professionals to fill key new roles. Others are looking to non-library professional programs to help train library professionals in new roles. While others are demanding library education change immediately to meet the demands for new skill sets required for new library positions. Two innovative esteemed Canadian Library School Directors will speak to the many challenges facing library and information professional programs in preparing library and information professionals for 21st century roles.”

To register for this free event and learn more about the speakers, be sure to visit the BCRLG website at: http://blogs.ubc.ca/bcrlglectures/2012/06/11/breathing-new-life-into-the-profession-lis-education-in-the-21st-century/.

Did you know?

The School of Library, Archival and Information Studies (SLAIS) has a cIRcle community at: https://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/588 with these three collections: SLAIS FacultySLAIS Research Days, and SLAIS Students. The top item in the SLAIS cIRcle community is entitled, “What is user engagement? A conceptual framework for defining user engagement with technology”. It has been viewed from countries such as Australia, Brazil, Germany, Indonesia, and others. Take a moment to view it in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/24466 today.

Above image and partial excerpt in italics are courtesy of the BCRLG blog site at: http://blogs.ubc.ca/bcrlglectures/.

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