On 9 March 2018, the 8th annual iSchool@UBC Research Day will be celebrating and showcasing its faculty and student research at UBC.

 

Each year, the iSchool hosts a Research Day, where students and faculty across all of the programs within the School showcase their research in the form of posters, talks and demonstrations. iSchool faculty are provincially, nationally and internationally recognized for their contributions and leadership in Library, Archival and Information Studies research.

 

By providing students with the opportunity to be directly involved in faculty research, the School seeks to enrich the overall quality of the educational experience. As well, students are encouraged to work independently on research projects that reflect their own interests and career goals. By expanding research opportunities and experiences for all students as they prepare them for their future roles as professional and academic leaders in the information professions. Research Day showcases the contributions of iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

 

 

View the event schedule here

 

Download the event poster (PDF)

 

 

Browse some examples of iSchool@UBC research already in cIRcle:

 

Human-centered information organization in online bookstores
Open access journals support in Canada: pan-Canadian bilingual survey of university libraries & presses Spring 2010 : selected results
Taking Shape: Knowledge as Museum Display
“The Participedia Project: Using an Open Source Platform to Mobilize Knowledge about Democratic Innovations”
Trusting Digital Preservation Services: Motives and Means of the Public Sector

 

Click here to access/download more iSchool@UBC research and stay tuned for more items coming soon!

 

 

 

Above excerpt text and image is courtesy of iSchool@UBC

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re a fan of children’s books, you won’t want to miss From Apple Pies to Astronauts, A Chronology of Alphabet Books with Aphorisms, Amusements, and Anecdotes! at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections. The exhibit offers a selection of English language alphabet books from the late 18th century to the present day. These books illustrate the changes in alphabetic education for young children in England, the United States, and Canada. The exhibition is curated by UBC Master of Library and Information Studies candidates Sarah Bagshaw and Laura Quintana, under the supervision of Professor Kathie Shoemaker.  We chatted with Laura and Sarah about their curation process.

What inspired you to create an exhibit around Alphabet Books? 

Sarah:  The books themselves were the inspiration.  Once Kathie Shoemaker suggested the idea, I got to search for alphabet books in the Rare Books and Special Collection catalogue.  Then I got to go and look at them and was amazed by all the different styles through time, all the differences and similarities to alphabet books now.  In discussing what I was looking at with my husband, he suggested displaying them in chronological order as well as going through the alphabet from A to Z.  This turned out to be an excellent way to showcase the books and the changes in illustration, the way they were written, and their educational purpose over time.

Laura: It was Sarah’s idea, actually. I got into the project in a later stage and helped her with everything I could. I have to say that I found the project really interesting. I did not grow up with Alphabet books and during our research we found out that in countries with languages other than English it is not as common as it is here to use alphabet books as an introduction to literacy.

What intrigues you about children’s books? 

Sarah: Children’s books are amazing.  There are so many wonderful books being published for children today.  Picture books are particularly fascinating as they tell stories with both text and pictures.  The types and styles of illustration we see now in picture books is incredible.  They are a window into the cultural context of the time period they come from as well as an entertainment piece for both adults and children.  Picture books are not easy to create.  They have to tell a story well and the text cannot fall down on the job – it has to work being read out loud.  Current writers could take a page or two from the writers of the past!  The rhyming text in the old alphabet books in the exhibit was a joy to read.

Laura: There is a common misconception that understands children’s literature as a second class kind of literature, as if authors and publishers were lowering their scales to produce books that appeal to children but are not good enough to engage adults. And it often happens that adults who read children’s literature are seen as infantile. Children’s literature has a specific audience, and that audience is the most demanding and honest of all. Authors need to really address a particular need and satisfy very high expectations. Children know what is good and what is not, and they won’t read a book that does not give them what they are asking for. Another important think to highlight is that children are still able to see the marvels of the world. Children’s books authors need to honor the splendour of that point of view and produce books that fully satisfy the children’s need for beauty, and that is not an easy thing to do. Alphabet books address a learning expectation, but they also appeal to children through illustrations, text, reading rhythm and originality. They are a learning tool and also a source for enjoyment. Alphabet books these days can be simply amazing.

How did the two of you come to work on this project?   

Sarah: Kathie Shoemaker approached me last summer while I was taking her Illustrated Materials for Children course about possibly putting together an exhibit of alphabet books in the Rare Books reading room.  This sounded like such a cool idea!  Everyone in the West who speaks English is familiar with alphabet books, we all grew up with them and there are so many different kinds.  To be able to look at old alphabet books as well as find beautifully illustrated new ones was so much fun. 

Laura: Sarah had already created the concept, and her enthusiasm and passion was contagious.

 

How did you select the books displayed in the exhibit? 

Sarah: Once we had the idea for a chronological tour, we selected books that best represented different eras or decades in the development of early childhood learning and alphabet books.  Some of the more recent alphabet books are very well known, but we felt that they should be included as they represented either specific ideas about children and learning, or a change in illustrative style.  Everyone knows Dr. Seuss, so did we need to have him in this exhibit?  Yes!!  He represents a big shift in the thinking about children, learning, and books.  Each book has a reason for being in the cases even if we didn’t create a lengthy item label for it. We were really lucky that Kathie has an extensive library of alphabet books to choose from and I also asked friends and family to search their libraries.

 Laura: We looked for the most appealing materials, and also for the ones that best represented a particular moment in time and in the evolution of Alphabet books.

Do you have a favourite alphabet book? 

Sarah: That’s hard.  There are certain books that have a nostalgia for me, like Cecily Mary Barker’s Flower Fairy Alphabet because I grew up with it, as well as Dr. Seuss.  Chicka Chicka Boom Boom  because we read that to our daughter and the rhythm in it is so spot on.  However, now that I have seen all these old alphabet books, I find the Battledoor fascinating for what it is and for showcasing street vendors from the early 19th century.  Wanda Gag’s ABC Bunny is such a good example of picture and text working together to tell a story.  The old alphabet books I got the most excited about are the ones illustrated by Walter Crane, who was part of the Arts and Crafts movement.  He worked with William Morris.  So many interesting things to read about him and his art!

 Laura: I fell in love with several of them, but if I have to choose it would be Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, with all its rhythm and freshness. I also love The Neverending Story since I was young, and until now I have never thought about the fact that it was written as an alphabet book, with chapters that start with a letter of the alphabet, in order. I found that very interesting.

What was your favourite children’s book as a child? 

Sarah: Another hard question!  My family is British and so I grew up with books from England.  I still have the copy my Granny sent me of Enid Blyton’s Magic Faraway Tree.  I blame this book for my love of fantasy and my fascination with doorways to other places.  I also have a soft spot for Wind in the Willows, original Winnie the Pooh, and A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson.  I pinched the family copy of The Real Mother Goose illustrated by Blanch Fisher Wright to use with our daughter and love looking into the history of weird and obscure nursery rhymes.  Clearly the rhyming and rhythm of text read out loud is important to me!

Laura: My favourite book as a child was Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens. I’m still in love with this concept of Peter Pan as a newborn child who can fly, who used to have wings and is able to fly because he does not know that that is impossible. In this book he does not need fairy dust or the help of Tinker Bell to be able to flyI felt so sad when I first read it: to think about a child who flies away from his mother and finds out later, when he wants to come back, that the windows have been barred and that his mother has a new baby that has taken his place. I think that it is a wonderful book with an extraordinary, powerful and heartwarming main character.

From Apple Pies to Astronauts is on display at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections on the first floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre from February 27 through April 30, 2017, and can be viewed Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 12-5 p.m. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and people of all ages are encouraged to attend. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

The School of Library, Archival and Information Studies is pleased to welcome Anne Lindsay, Access and Research Archivist for the NCTR, as a speaker in the iSchool’s Winter 2017 Colloquium program. She is speaking Wednesday, January 18, from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. on the topic of “Beyond Jenkinson: Authority, provenance, and Arrangement in a Complex Digital Collection at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.”

Event Details

The talk will be given in the Dodson Room (Room 302), 3rd floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Registration is not necessary and the talk is open to all interested members of the community. Light refreshments will be served.

The iSchool at UBC (School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies) invites guest speakers to participate in the Colloquia Series. These events are open to the public, and are of interest to faculty, current students, alumni, and other professionals and researchers in the community.

The faculty contacts for the Colloquia Colloquia Series are Dr. Aaron Loehrlein and Dr. Heather O’Brien.

Research Day 2016: Keynote Speech

Friday, March 11, 11:00am-12:00pm

The Curator and Copyright

How does it happen that a practicing archivist, fully happy with the normal archival tasks of accessioning, describing, preserving, and making available archival collections, ends up spending most of his time thinking about copyright?  This talk will highlight three areas that seem core to the archival mission but that are also shaped by copyright.  Archivists can use new technologies to increase access to holdings, license access to content from the repository, and preserve born-digital objects.  Yet there is a copyright component to all these activities.  Understanding that component and how to minimize the risk that it poses should be part of the archivist’s toolkit. 

Speaker bio

Peter Hirtle, Affiliate Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University

Until his retirement from Cornell in 2015, he served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Cornell University Library with a special mandate to address intellectual property issues.  Previously at Cornell, Hirtle served as Director of the Cornell Institute for Digital Collections and as the Associate Editor of D-Lib Magazine.  He is an archivist by training with an MA in History from Johns Hopkins and an MLS with a concentration in archival science from the University of Maryland.  Hirtle is a Fellow and Past President of the Society of American Archivists and is a member of its Working Group on Intellectual Property.  He was a member of the Commission on Preservation and Access/Research Library Group’s Task Force on Digital Archiving and the Copyright Office’s Section 108 Study Group, and is a contributing author to the LibraryLaw.com blog.

“We Feel Fine”: Big Data Observations about State Institutions and Social Inclusion
Dr. Victoria L. Lemieux, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia (on leave) and Senior Public Sector Specialist, The World Bank

Event Details

Abstract of the Talk: On December 17th, 2010, a Tunisian fruit vendor named Mohammed Bouazizi took a can of gasoline and set himself on fire in front of the local governor’s office. Bouazizi’s actions resulted from having his fruit cart confiscated by local police and his frustration at not obtaining an audience with the local governor; his death is said to have sparked what we now know as the “Arab Spring.” The events leading up to and during the Arab Spring raise questions of what causes citizens to protest against their governments? Theorists from different disciplines have put forward many explanations of such events but in this project, Dr. Lemieux discusses her work leading an international research team investigating the relationship between social protest and citizen trust. Though motivated by the Arab Spring, the study focuses on protests during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Football Event that took place in Brazil from 12 June – 13 July 2014. The study is an exploratory one in which the team has drawn upon public administration and political science literature relating to trust in government, as well as from literature on social protest theory from social psychology and sociology. Operationalizing the construct of trust in the study as a measure of the sentiment expressed in the content of twitter data, the team built a tool for and conducted a visual analysis of sentiment classified Twitter data to derive insights about the following research questions: 1) how did citizens feel about their state institutions around the time of the protests, 2) how did these feelings connect to their sentiments about Brazilian Federal and State Government and politicians and 3) how did such sentiments translate into collective behaviours? The results of the study reveal that the 2014 World Cup protests in Brazil sprang from a wide range of grievances coupled with a relative sense of deprivation compared with emergent comparative ‘standards’.  This sense of grievance gave rise to sentiments that activated online protest and may have led to other forms of social protest, such as street demonstrations.

Biography of the Speaker: Dr. Victoria Lemieux is a Senior Public Sector Specialist (Information Management) and an Associate Professor of Archival Studies at the University of British Columbia (on leave). She has held positions as a professional archivist, records manager and risk manager within the public sector and private sectors, and in higher education as an administrator and educator. She has also consulted previously for the United Nations, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the World Bank. Her current research is focused on risk to the availability of trustworthy records, in particular in financial contexts, and how these risks impact upon transparency, financial stability, public accountability and human rights. She holds a doctorate from University College London (Archival Studies, 2002), which focused on the information-related causes of the Jamaican Banking Crisis and, since 2005, has been a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP). She is also the winner of the 2015 Emmett Leahy Award which recognizes an individual whose contributions and accomplishments have had a major impact on the records and information management profession.

 

iSchool_dean_PreecesmJoin us on  Wednesday, September 24th, 2014, 4:00-5:00PM, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Dodson Room (Rm 302) as Dr. Jennifer Preece gives a talk on Citizen Science: Information, Technology and People, as part of the iSchool at UBC’s colloquia series.

Dr. Jennifer Preece is the Dean of the College of Information Studies, a Professor at the University of Maryland. and a member of the University of Maryland Human-Computer Interaction Lab.  She researches online communities and is known for her work on what makes such a community successful, and how usability factors interact with socialibility in online communities.  Her research interests are in: computer-mediated communication, human-computer interaction, online communities, management and design of social media, motivation for participation in social media, mobile communication

Her two most recent books are:


Wednesday, September 24th, 2014, 4:00-5:00PM, at the Dodson Room (Rm #302),

at the the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (1961 East Mall, University of British Columbia)


openscholar

From left: Tara Stephens, cIRcle Librarian; Helen Halbert, Open Scholar winner; and Daniel Wood, VP Academic and External Affairs, UBC GSS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate change mitigation and mobile device engagement are the topics of the latest graduate student submissions to win the GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award.

The award highlights UBC as a leader in the open dissemination of graduate student work, and creates an incentive for grad students to populate cIRcle with material beyond theses and dissertations. The prize is a collaboration between the Graduate Student Society and cIRcle, UBC’s digital repository that was set up by the Library in 2007.

Polly Ng, who specialized in sustainability planning at UBC’s School of Community and Regional Planning, was recognized for her entry Making the case for using development cost charges for climate change mitigation.

Meanwhile, Helen Halbert was part of a trio that produced the paper Toward a Model of Mobile User Engagement. Halbert, the sole graduate student involved in the project (the other authors are a Postdoctoral Fellow and an Assistant Professor), has just completed her studies for a Master of Library and Information Studies degree at UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies.

Authors of winning submissions, which are chosen on a lottery system, receive $500; their work is made publicly available on a long-term basis by UBC Library’s cIRcle.

“I knew early on in my studies that I wanted my research to make a solid contribution to professional practice in my field,” says Ng. “I hope that the GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award encourages more research that works on practical solutions to practical problems.”

“I think this award is a great way to recognize the diverse work that UBC graduate students do outside of their theses and dissertations,” adds Halbert. “[The award] serves to increase awareness of open access publishing among graduate students and, in doing so, promotes the practice of sharing academic research with all – regardless of whether they are members of the UBC community or not.”

The GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Award is given twice a year. The submission deadline for the next award instalment is September 24, 2014, although submissions can be made at any time – please visit cIRcle for more information.

 

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