Research Day showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

Questions about social media as sources of information about individuals (of different ages, genders, backgrounds) and communities, their uses in our personal and professional lives, and impact on our practices and overall well-being are central to the work of students and scholars across all our iSchool programs. Recognizing this common ground, this year’s Research Day will focus on the broad topic of “information, social media, and well-being,” considering the many connections social media now have with the way we do information, library, and archival studies.

This event happened on March 10, 2017.


Speaker:

Lyle Ungar, Professor of Computer And Information Science, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 200 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on eleven patents. His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including spectral methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

“Social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect portal onto people’s lives.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.”


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Smith, R. J., Crutchley, P., Schwartz, H. A., Ungar, L., Shofer, F., Padrez, K. A., & Merchant, R. M. (2017). Variations in Facebook Posting Patterns Across Validated Patient Health Conditions: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(1), e7. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Kern, M. L., Park, G., Eichstaedt, J. C., Schwartz, H. A., Sap, M., Smith, L. K., & Ungar, L. H. (2016). Gaining insights from social media language: Methodologies and challenges. [Link]

Sinnenberg, L., DiSilvestro, C. L., Mancheno, C., Dailey, K., Tufts, C., Buttenheim, A. M., … & Asch, D. A. (2016). Twitter as a Potential Data Source for Cardiovascular Disease Research. Jama cardiology, 1(9), 1032-1036. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Brooks, S. (05/01/2015). Computers in human behavior: Does personal social media usage affect efficiency and well-being? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.053 [Link]

Gerson, J., Plagnol, A. C., & Corr, P. J. (10/01/2016). Computers in human behavior: Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on facebook? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023 [Link]


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“Free Screening of the award winning documentary “Terms and Conditions May Apply”.

Come join Katie Kalk and the Digital Tattoo project team for a fascinating documentary that exposes what corporations and governments learn about people through Internet and cell phone usage, and what can be done about it.

Facilitators: Katie Kalk, Marga Heras, Rie Namba


Lillooet Room (Rm 301), Chapman Learning Commons, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

TwitterThere was an interesting blog post on the “Teaching Channel” yesterday called, “Getting Started with Twitter in the Classroom.“  It discussed ways teachers could be gradually introduced to Twitter and how they could eventually incorporate the social media format into classroom activities.  Some examples were: having a “PLAYDATE” at the school where teachers could play with the Twitter in a relaxed setting, to “Twitter Tuesdays” where teachers would tweet on behalf of the students on various topics the children are learning about. Gradually the classroom conversation could advance to topics such as what it means to have an online presence and other basics of online interaction.

Read the entire post here: https://www.teachingchannel.org/blog/2013/06/20/twitter-in-the-classroom/

The Vancouver School Board is thinking of implementing a social media policy that would prohibit teachers from being friends with their students on social media sites. Teachers and students would only be permitted to communicate on these sites for educational purposes (ex: asking/answering questions about a classroom assignment, contributing to a class blog, etc). 

Click here to read the article by CBC news

@UBC Library Twitter

At a library research conference last November, presenter Willie Miller discussed his study that focused on the use of Twitter by members of the Associated Research Libraries (ARL). Miller examined the most successful accounts in terms of engagement, and ranked @UBCLibrary – managed by the Library’s Communications and Marketing team – as one of the top three influential accounts in North America. UBC Library was the only Canadian institution in the study’s top 10 list.

View the presentation at “ARL Klout study: significance of Twitter in academic libraries” and learn more by visiting the conference website (2012 IUPUI University Library and School of Information and Library Science Joint Research Conference – Indiana University). 

Read more from UBC Library’s Community Report (2013).

 

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It has been only three weeks since UBC Education Library joined Twitter and already we’ve gained quite a nice following!  We’re tweeting news in Education and UBC Education Library events and workshops. 

 

Won’t you follow us if you haven’t already?

https://twitter.com/UBCEdLib



Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS). As social creatures, our online lives just like our offline lives are intertwined with others within a wide variety of social networks. Each retweet on Twitter, comment on a blog or link to a Youtube video explicitly or implicitly connects one online participant to another and contributes to the formation of various information and social networks. Once discovered, these networks can provide researchers with an effective mechanism for identifying and studying collaborative processes within any online community. However, collecting information about online networks using traditional methods such as surveys can be very time consuming and expensive. The presentation will explore automated ways to discover and analyze various information and social networks from social media data.

Biography

Anatoliy Gruzd is Assistant Professor in the School of Information Management and Director of the Social Media Lab at Dalhousie University. His research initiatives explore how social media and other web 2.0 technologies are changing the ways in which people disseminate knowledge and information and how these changes are impacting social, economic and political norms and structures of our modern society. Dr. Gruzd is also actively developing and testing new web tools and apps for discovering and visualizing information and online social networks. The broad aim of his various research initiatives is to provide decision makers with additional knowledge and insights into the behaviors and relationships of online network members, and to understand how these interpersonal connections influence our personal choices and actions.


Select Articles Available at UBC Library

Gruzd, A., Staves, K., Wilk, A. (2012). Connected Scholars: Examining the Role of Social Media in Research Practices of Faculty using the UTAUT model.Computers in Human Behavior 28 (6), 2340-2350. Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074756321200204X

Gruzd, A., and Sedo, D.R. (2012) #1b1t: Investigating Reading Practices at the Turn of the Twenty-first Century. Journal of Studies in Book Culture, Special issue on New Studies in the History of Reading 3(2). Link: http://www.erudit.org/revue/memoires/2012/v3/n2/1009347ar.html

Takhteyev, Y., Gruzd, A., and Wellman, B. (2012). Geography of Twitter Networks. Social Networks, Special issue on Space and Networks, 34(1): 73-81. Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378873311000359 


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