sojourners-logo

For seven years, the journal has showcased exemplary papers written by students with a sociological perspective. Contributing to the journal affords students an invaluable opportunity to have their work published early in their academic careers.

– A Message from the Sojourners’  Co-editors in Chief

 

After a year in the making, it is a pleasure to announce the arrival of Sojourners in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

 

BACKGROUND

In the words of first Editor-in-Chief of Sojourners, Sierra Skye Gemma, this young journal began as “a simple idea”. It was dubbed “the journal” – “a student proposal to provide a venue for the publication of outstanding undergraduate writing in Sociology”.

Not only did this become evident early on (in fact, in 2008), “the Sociology Students Association transformed this idea into a reality by voting to make “the journal” one of the Association’s central projects in that school year”.

First came the planning, followed by the submission, review, editing process. With the major undertaking of a successful fundraising campaign much to the credit of Maureen Mendoza, “you as, the Reader, would not be reading this first issue”, noted Gemma.

Due to the overwhelming student response back then, the journal article submissions were from many UBC departments and included book reviews whereby many “donated their time and talents to the journal”.

While traveling through the unfamiliar world of academic publishing, the Sojourners’ authors wanted to “provide [their] readers with the opportunity to take a sociological sojourn in unknown places, (sub)cultures, and realms of thought”.

So, with a number of articles from Volume 1 to the present day, the Sojourners’ journal highlights both timely and topical subjects involved when studying and researching the world of sociology and its influence whether it be on people, (sub)cultures and perceptions as seen through the eyes UBC’s undergraduate students.

“The articles span the globe, with Connor Cavanagh focusing on famine in Zimbabwe and Michael Kehl deliberating on the effects of the “Three Strikes” law in California. They also address a wide range of topics, from Manori Ravindran’s consideration of postfeminism and the pop music phenomenon of The Spice Girls to Hélène Frohard-Dourlent’s analysis of the impact of socioeconomic status on children’s success in school.”

With such support, Sojourners will surely continue to be published for many years to come.

 

QUICK FACTS

Sojourners (an undergraduate Journal of Sociology) is a peer and Faculty reviewed journal published annually by the Sociology Students Association of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

‘While Sojourners provides a platform for the dissemination of sociological undergraduate work, it is not department-specific and its articles span the globe’.

NOTE: Submissions are accepted in the fall of each year.

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Full-text and openly accessible Volumes 1, 2, 3/4, 5 and 6 &7 of Sojourners (and future volumes) via cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

sojourners-logo

For seven years, the journal has showcased exemplary papers written by students with a sociological perspective. Contributing to the journal affords students an invaluable opportunity to have their work published early in their academic careers.

– A Message from the Sojourners’  Co-editors in Chief

 

After a year in the making, it is a pleasure to announce the arrival of Sojourners in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

 

BACKGROUND

In the words of first Editor-in-Chief of Sojourners, Sierra Skye Gemma, this young journal began as “a simple idea”. It was dubbed “the journal” – “a student proposal to provide a venue for the publication of outstanding undergraduate writing in Sociology”.

Not only did this become evident early on (in fact, in 2008), “the Sociology Students Association transformed this idea into a reality by voting to make “the journal” one of the Association’s central projects in that school year”.

First came the planning, followed by the submission, review, editing process. With the major undertaking of a successful fundraising campaign much to the credit of Maureen Mendoza, “you as, the Reader, would not be reading this first issue”, noted Gemma.

Due to the overwhelming student response back then, the journal article submissions were from many UBC departments and included book reviews whereby many “donated their time and talents to the journal”.

While traveling through the unfamiliar world of academic publishing, the Sojourners’ authors wanted to “provide [their] readers with the opportunity to take a sociological sojourn in unknown places, (sub)cultures, and realms of thought”.

So, with a number of articles from Volume 1 to the present day, the Sojourners’ journal highlights both timely and topical subjects involved when studying and researching the world of sociology and its influence whether it be on people, (sub)cultures and perceptions as seen through the eyes UBC’s undergraduate students.

“The articles span the globe, with Connor Cavanagh focusing on famine in Zimbabwe and Michael Kehl deliberating on the effects of the “Three Strikes” law in California. They also address a wide range of topics, from Manori Ravindran’s consideration of postfeminism and the pop music phenomenon of The Spice Girls to Hélène Frohard-Dourlent’s analysis of the impact of socioeconomic status on children’s success in school.”

With such support, Sojourners will surely continue to be published for many years to come.

 

QUICK FACTS

Sojourners (an undergraduate Journal of Sociology) is a peer and Faculty reviewed journal published annually by the Sociology Students Association of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

‘While Sojourners provides a platform for the dissemination of sociological undergraduate work, it is not department-specific and its articles span the globe’.

NOTE: Submissions are accepted in the fall of each year.

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Full-text and openly accessible Volumes 1, 2, 3/4, 5 and 6 &7 of Sojourners (and future volumes) via cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

February 27, 2016 | 1:00-3:30pm | Irving K. Barber Learning Centre Room 182 | Historically, insects were considered to be "legal persons" that could be held responsible for damaging crops and harming human health. Today, insects are seen as objects of nature that demand legal protection. Learn how and why this historical shift has taken place and what it tells us about the oscillating line between human/non-human and law/nature.

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Department of Sociology at UBC.

On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City

The War on Crime didn’t just send millions of Black young men to prison and return them home with felony convictions. It created a little known surveillance state in America’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods.

Goffman moved into one such neighborhood in college and spent the next six years documenting the routine stops, searches, raids, and beatings that young men negotiate as they come of age. In what she calls “the fugitive life”, the fear of capture and confinement has come to permeate everyday activities, not just for young men on probation or running from a low level warrant, but for their partners, families, and law-abiding neighbors.

This fugitive life is the hidden counterpoint to mass incarceration, and the vivid picture Goffman paints is a grim one. But for the first time in four decades, policy analysts believe we have entered a unique reform moment where real change in drug laws and sentencing guidelines may be possible. How can we transform the criminal justice system from an occupying force into a source of public safety? How can we repair the damage the War on Crime has wrought in poor Black communities, and help people heal? What could an alternative system look like?

More on this topic:
Goffman, A. (2014). On the run: Fugitive life in an American city. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [Available at UBC Library]


This session is appropriate for students conducting literature reviews in any discipline.
Topics include
… what is a literature review?
… finding the right databases
… search strategies for databases
… finding scholarly articles, theses and dissertations, books, and more
… resources to help you keep track of your research.
There will be plenty of hands-on time for searching, and assistance from the two presenting librarians.

 

 


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by Green College’s Population Health lecture series.  Health is a societal resource to be produced in everyday life based on the (unequally distributed) resources people have individually and collectively available. In regard to such resources, economic and social forms of capital have been studied extensively, whereas the effects of cultural capital are much less well understood. Using examples from an ongoing health survey in Switzerland, Thomas Abel will argue that particularly in societies with comprehensive social security systems in place, people’s cultural capital may occupy a central role in the production of health. He will present examples of measures of cultural and social capital currently tested in an ongoing health survey in Switzerland and address questions on measurement and/or issues on theoretical-conceptual challenges around cultural capital and health. Thomas Abel is a visiting Professor at UBC Vancouver. He joined UBC in March and will continue his research until October 31st, 2012. Thomas is a Medical Sociologist and Full Professor for Health Research at the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine of the University of Bern, Switzerland (http://www.ispm.ch ). In Bern he is chair of the division of Social and Behavioural Health Research. Applying a structure-agency perspective, Thomas Abel’s major research program addresses issues of social stratification and inequalities in health and health behaviours.

Census GIS is the topic for this month’s GIS Users Group meeting.  Tom Brittnacher, the GIS Librarian, will be talking about how to get census data and geographic boundaries out of SimplyMap and Abacus, and into GIS.

Wednesday, March 28
3:00 – 4:00 PM
Koerner Library, Level 2, Room 216

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