[The following was written by Trang Dang, who worked in UBC Archives in the Work Learn student employee programme from September 2019 to April 2020]

Being a graduate student of the UBC School of Information with an interest in archival processing, the Work Learn position with the UBC Archives provided me significant practical experiences. It helped reinforce my knowledge of archival theory and records management.

Since September 2019, I worked on several fonds and collections, including both institutional and personal records. With little previous working experience in archives, the gradual complexity of the assigned projects certainly helped me to become more proficient with archival arrangement and description.

I found personal archives unique and interesting, but it was not short of challenges, especially when records arrived “loose” with no obvious order, making it difficult to construct the context behind each record.

I started off with the accrued accession of the Joy Coghill fonds, from a Vancouver-based theatre director and actress, and a UBC alumna. It contained personal correspondence, miscellaneous records, and photographs. As the accrual didn’t have an “original” order, and the fonds was already arranged, the challenge came from identifying the records and assigning them to the appropriate existing series.

The photographs, which came in loose with many letters and cards in a black plastic bag, also posed difficulties due to the lack of context. Only a few of the prints had written information on the back such as dates, names and events, whereas the 35mm negatives were very small, making it hard to determine the subject. After consulting with my supervisor, we decided to keep only photographs with Joy Coghill in them, both by herself and with other individuals. Most of those individuals were unidentifiable except for Coghill’s immediate family such as her mother, husband, and daughters. To help with identification of some of the events and people a relative of Coghill had agreed to come to the Archives, and she went through the photographs with us. The prints that she couldn’t identify were then scanned and emailed to Coghill’s daughter for further assistance. Unprocessed and unidentified materials were returned to Coghill’s family.

The small research collection on Sister Mary Gonzaga collected by Barbara Gibson was straight-forward in terms of arrangement and description. Nonetheless, it was fascinating to discover that Sister Gonzaga’s letters were being held at UBC Rare Books and Special Collections. These two collections are closely connected and complement each other.

Eventually, the projects became bigger in size and so did my tasks, including researching historical background, identifying the intellectual order, and compiling the description for the entire fonds. Processing the personal archives of Laurenda Daniells, the first University Archivist, was not too challenging as the majority of records relating to her professional life had already been arranged in series upon accrual. However, similar to the difficulties encountered in Joy Coghill fonds, more time was needed to process the materials recording her personal life.

On the other hand, institutional records also came with its own challenges. For the Division of Industrial Education fonds, I first needed to compile the file list of each box. As the fonds didn’t come in an “original” order, my job was to determine the series and then physically rearrange the records accordingly.

The most challenging project were the records of the Xwi7xwa Library, a sous-fonds of the Library fonds. The difficulty arose from the complicated history of the records creator. Before becoming the official branch of the UBC Library, it was part of the Indian Education Resources Centre, and then the First Nations House of Learning. As it was not easy to determine which records were created by the Xwi7xwa Library itself, we decided to keep all except for duplicate records, and those that contained personal information.

Overall, besides the hands-on experiences in archival processing, my biggest lesson taken from this Work Learn position was the importance of decision-making and its documentation. Sometimes the archivist has to determine the order of the archives, and sometimes it might not be the best arrangement, therefore, it is critical to document any decisions during the process.

 

 

Did you know that, in 1998, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) was founded by John Willinsky in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (UBC)? Its aim was and still is today to “improv[e] the scholarly and public quality of research”.

UBC “support[s] scholarly pursuits that contribute to knowledge and understanding within and across disciplines and seek[s] every opportunity to share them broadly” as outlined in the From UBC’s Place and Promise Strategic Plan and echoed in the Library’s Strategic Framework. Discover why PKP is a critical platform in open scholarly communications infrastructure via Digital Programs and Services at UBC Library.

 

Read the Library’s full PKP blog post

 

Explore Open Journals Systems (OJS)

 

Find out more about Open UBC

 

 

 

 

Introduced as a new service to help UBC Vancouver faculty meet Canadian copyright law and Fair Dealing Requirements, the syllabus service provides them with the ability to upload their course readings/syllabi directly into the Library Online Course Reserves system (LOCR), part of the Canvas Learning Management Platform at UBC. It ensures that course materials uphold Canadian copyright law and UBC license agreements and policies.

Copyright infringement, through the distribution of published works to students, unfortunately exposes the University and its faculty to legal jeopardy thus the Library is making copyright compliance as feasible and streamlined as possible for UBC faculty and students.

“We continue to take every possible step to support faculty in their teaching efforts, and ensure they remain knowledgeable and compliant with Canadian copyright law,” says Allan Bell, Associate University Librarian, Digital Programs and Services.

 

Read the full Library announcement

 

Explore Copyright Requirements for UBC Faculty and Staff

 

Discover Mediated Course Reserves at UBCO

 

Learn more about Scholarly Communications @ UBC

 

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of the MURC – UBC Student Services‘ site

 

Touted as the biggest undergraduate research conference in B.C., the Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC) is a key annual event highlighting the contributions of undergraduate scholarly inquiry and research at UBC. It affords an opportunity for undergraduate students campus-wide to present their singular or collaborative UBC research projects while sharing their unique UBC research perspectives and experiences.

 

Participation in the conference is on a voluntary basis, with students having the choice of giving either an oral, poster or visual arts/performance presentation of their work. Presentations are judged by graduate students, and prizes are awarded for the top oral, poster and visual arts/performance presentations at a closing celebratory reception.

 

You may know some past and most recent UBC MURC award winners but did you know that in 2012, three UBC MURC award winners – Alvin Ip (UBC Vancouver), Ben MacLeod (UBC Vancouver) and Ryan Trenholm (UBC Okanagan) – went abroad to represent UBC at the international 8th Universitas21 Undergraduate Research Conference (July 1 – 5, 2012) at the Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan? That’s just one of the noteworthy experiences enjoyed by UBC MURC award winners and shared with their fellow UBC students, academic and research mentors, family and friends at this unique conference.

 

With over 9,000 item views and 2,800 item downloads to date, check out the MURC award winner poster and slide presentations in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the Library’s Open Collections digital collections’ portal!

 

 

 

 

 

The Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC) celebrates the contributions of undergraduate scholarly inquiry/research at UBC. It provides an opportunity for students from across campus to present a project they have been working on while engaging in scholarly debate amongst each other.

 

Participation in the conference is on a voluntary basis, with students having the choice of giving either an oral, poster or visual arts/performance presentation of their work. Presentations are judged by graduate students, and prizes are awarded for the top oral, poster and visual arts/performance presentations at a closing celebratory reception.

 

The next MURC conference is happening at UBC on March 16, 2019 at 8:00 AM to 6:30 PM.

 

If you’re interested in presenting at MURC 2019, visit the MURC site for more details.

 

Browse the MURC collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the Library’s Open Collections portal

 

Above image is courtesy of the MURC – UBC Student Services‘ site

 

 

 

 

In celebration of open access and its global impact for over a decade, UBC and SFU will be participating in the 2018 International Open Access Week event during October 22-28, 2018.

 

Throughout UBC’s 2018 Open Access Week event, scholars will showcase and discuss their innovative research, teaching and learning skills and experiences while inspiring others to learn more and get involved with the global open access movement. These events will highlight the various opportunities and pathways enabling open scholarship for researchers at UBC and beyond.

 

Similar to past UBC Open Access Week events, this year will include free lectures, workshops, a panel discussion with a Q&A session, seminars, and symposia for students, faculty, staff, and the general public. Topical and timely issues will include the following ones to list just a few:

 

  • new challenges faced by practitioners and stakeholders
  • developing a scholarly/publishing profile
  • applying Creative Commons licenses to your work
  • navigating the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy (NSERC, SSHRC and CIHR)
  • discovering Open Educational Resources (OER)

 

Visit Open UBC to register and attend these free events

 

Learn more about Open Access at UBC

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2017-2018!

 

In 2017-2018, cIRcle reached another milestone of over 60,000 items and saw an increase of its annual growth rate from 8% in previous years to 10%.

 

This report highlights’ include a sampling of cIRcle’s new and ongoing partnerships, its growth and development along with a snapshot of its top content contributors.

 

Two spotlights of cIRcle projects and collections included in the report are the BioMed Central/SpringerOpen project and the noteworthy additions in the UBC President’s Speeches and Writing collection.

 

Explore UBC research in cIRcle, for example, the growing number of preprints and postprints of academic journal articles, conference proceedings, departmental publications, technical reports, course notes, and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to release the cIRcle Annual Impact & Activity Report 2016-2017!

 

In 2016-2017, cIRcle (UBC’s Digital Repository) had over 56,000 items. In the past two years, cIRcle has archived more than 4,000 deposits per year — an average annual growth rate of 8%.

 

Other highlights included in the report:

  • A breakdown of the increase in faculty content and a quick summary of the top content contributors
  • Developed cIRcle guidelines and practices on improving metadata for greater access and discoverability via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal
  • Featured Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum and UBC alumna, Mary-Lou Florian
  • Spotlight on a few key partnerships and collaborations such as the Vancouver Institute Lecture Series and more

 

A quick sampling of new additions to cIRcle included:

Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59683

Form follows parking : strategies for mitigating the impacts of excess parking supply http://hdl.handle.net/2429/57704

Embedding the Frames of Evidence-Based Practice : Intersections in Librarianship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58260

Research Data Management (RDM) Needs of Science and Engineering Researchers : A View from Canada http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58265

Analyzing Fire Ignition Data in the Kamloops, Lillooet and Merritt fire zones : with implications toward the effects of fire suppression on the landscape http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59241

The landscape of rare cancer : a sea of opportunity http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59312

Interventions to Improve Patient Hand Hygiene : A Systematic Review http://hdl.handle.net/2429/60520

 

And, last but not least by any means, we were thrilled to add the first fourteen items from UBC President Santa Ono and we look forward to adding more this year!

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

In musical practice, there is an assortment of musical elements at “play”.

 

Just think. Real-time creative decision-making. Risk-taking. Collaboration.

 

So what happens when they all “play” together?

 

Improvisation! That is, musical improvisation.

 

“I’ll play it first and tell you what it’s called later.” – Miles Davis

 

The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) is known as “a central source for the collection and dissemination of research on the social implications of improvisational practices”.

 

Founded as a partnered research institute from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) project, “Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice” (ICASP), IICSI has its own research team. It consists of 58 scholars, students, creative practitioners, and community partners representing 20 different academic institutions including the University of British Columbia (UBC) and over 30 community-based organizations.

 

Together, they are “creating a vibrant intellectual hub and a focal point for leading-edge research and critical inquiry in the field of improvisation studies”. Through this network comes the following benefits such as ‘new technologies and models for practice-based research, knowledge transfers, new research, student training, and development of policies, instruments, and technologies’ to list just a few.

 

IICSI has three main strategic research priorities: 1) Improvisation as Practice-Based Research, 2) Improvisation, Community Health, and Social Responsibility, and 3) Improvisation, Intermediality, and Experimental Technologies.

 

Below is a quick soupçon of the IICSI sample research-intensive questions under current exploration:

 

Sample Research Questions re: 1)

How do arts-based improvisatory practices themselves suggest new models of knowledge transfer?

How might these practices help us measure the impact of our research activities, and how might they enable a broader range of stakeholders to engage with these activities?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 2)

How do improvisational arts-based practices contribute to the development and flourishing of healthy communities?

How (and to what extent) do these practices help communities (particularly at-risk and aggrieved populations) produce new understandings of identity, history, memory, and the body?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 3)

How can new technologies help facilitate the ability of communities to improvise across time, space, and ability limitations?

How might intermedial co-creation develop new opportunities for mobilizing knowledge?

 

With more research questions arising faster than they can be probed, it is good to know that IICSI has created an online research library housing a range of items such as films, articles, think pieces, and interviews.

 

At UBC, cIRcle is not only helping to disseminate IICSI research and make it openly accessible, it is also archiving and preserving this unique musical form of scholarly research for future scholars, practitioners and the general public.

 

Explore the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) Colloquium cIRcle collection via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal and stay tuned for more!

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

In musical practice, there is an assortment of musical elements at “play”.

 

Just think. Real-time creative decision-making. Risk-taking. Collaboration.

 

So what happens when they all “play” together?

 

Improvisation! That is, musical improvisation.

 

“I’ll play it first and tell you what it’s called later.” – Miles Davis

 

The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) is known as “a central source for the collection and dissemination of research on the social implications of improvisational practices”.

 

Founded as a partnered research institute from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) project, “Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice” (ICASP), IICSI has its own research team. It consists of 58 scholars, students, creative practitioners, and community partners representing 20 different academic institutions including the University of British Columbia (UBC) and over 30 community-based organizations.

 

Together, they are “creating a vibrant intellectual hub and a focal point for leading-edge research and critical inquiry in the field of improvisation studies”. Through this network comes the following benefits such as ‘new technologies and models for practice-based research, knowledge transfers, new research, student training, and development of policies, instruments, and technologies’ to list just a few.

 

IICSI has three main strategic research priorities: 1) Improvisation as Practice-Based Research, 2) Improvisation, Community Health, and Social Responsibility, and 3) Improvisation, Intermediality, and Experimental Technologies.

 

Below is a quick soupçon of the IICSI sample research-intensive questions under current exploration:

 

Sample Research Questions re: 1)

How do arts-based improvisatory practices themselves suggest new models of knowledge transfer?

How might these practices help us measure the impact of our research activities, and how might they enable a broader range of stakeholders to engage with these activities?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 2)

How do improvisational arts-based practices contribute to the development and flourishing of healthy communities?

How (and to what extent) do these practices help communities (particularly at-risk and aggrieved populations) produce new understandings of identity, history, memory, and the body?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 3)

How can new technologies help facilitate the ability of communities to improvise across time, space, and ability limitations?

How might intermedial co-creation develop new opportunities for mobilizing knowledge?

 

With more research questions arising faster than they can be probed, it is good to know that IICSI has created an online research library housing a range of items such as films, articles, think pieces, and interviews.

 

At UBC, cIRcle is not only helping to disseminate IICSI research and make it openly accessible, it is also archiving and preserving this unique musical form of scholarly research for future scholars, practitioners and the general public.

 

Explore the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) Colloquium cIRcle collection via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal and stay tuned for more!

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

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