The Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC) celebrates the contributions of undergraduate scholarly inquiry/research at UBC. It provides an opportunity for students from across campus to present a project they have been working on while engaging in scholarly debate amongst each other.

 

Participation in the conference is on a voluntary basis, with students having the choice of giving either an oral, poster or visual arts/performance presentation of their work. Presentations are judged by graduate students, and prizes are awarded for the top oral, poster and visual arts/performance presentations at a closing celebratory reception.

 

The next MURC conference is happening at UBC on March 16, 2019 at 8:00 AM to 6:30 PM.

 

If you’re interested in presenting at MURC 2019, visit the MURC site for more details.

 

Browse the MURC collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the Library’s Open Collections portal

 

Above image is courtesy of the MURC – UBC Student Services‘ site

 

 

 

 

In celebration of open access and its global impact for over a decade, UBC and SFU will be participating in the 2018 International Open Access Week event during October 22-28, 2018.

 

Throughout UBC’s 2018 Open Access Week event, scholars will showcase and discuss their innovative research, teaching and learning skills and experiences while inspiring others to learn more and get involved with the global open access movement. These events will highlight the various opportunities and pathways enabling open scholarship for researchers at UBC and beyond.

 

Similar to past UBC Open Access Week events, this year will include free lectures, workshops, a panel discussion with a Q&A session, seminars, and symposia for students, faculty, staff, and the general public. Topical and timely issues will include the following ones to list just a few:

 

  • new challenges faced by practitioners and stakeholders
  • developing a scholarly/publishing profile
  • applying Creative Commons licenses to your work
  • navigating the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy (NSERC, SSHRC and CIHR)
  • discovering Open Educational Resources (OER)

 

Visit Open UBC to register and attend these free events

 

Learn more about Open Access at UBC

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2017-2018!

 

In 2017-2018, cIRcle reached another milestone of over 60,000 items and saw an increase of its annual growth rate from 8% in previous years to 10%.

 

This report highlights’ include a sampling of cIRcle’s new and ongoing partnerships, its growth and development along with a snapshot of its top content contributors.

 

Two spotlights of cIRcle projects and collections included in the report are the BioMed Central/SpringerOpen project and the noteworthy additions in the UBC President’s Speeches and Writing collection.

 

Explore UBC research in cIRcle, for example, the growing number of preprints and postprints of academic journal articles, conference proceedings, departmental publications, technical reports, course notes, and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a pleasure to release the cIRcle Annual Impact & Activity Report 2016-2017!

 

In 2016-2017, cIRcle (UBC’s Digital Repository) had over 56,000 items. In the past two years, cIRcle has archived more than 4,000 deposits per year — an average annual growth rate of 8%.

 

Other highlights included in the report:

  • A breakdown of the increase in faculty content and a quick summary of the top content contributors
  • Developed cIRcle guidelines and practices on improving metadata for greater access and discoverability via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal
  • Featured Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum and UBC alumna, Mary-Lou Florian
  • Spotlight on a few key partnerships and collaborations such as the Vancouver Institute Lecture Series and more

 

A quick sampling of new additions to cIRcle included:

Enhancing the clinical reflective capacities of nursing students http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59683

Form follows parking : strategies for mitigating the impacts of excess parking supply http://hdl.handle.net/2429/57704

Embedding the Frames of Evidence-Based Practice : Intersections in Librarianship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58260

Research Data Management (RDM) Needs of Science and Engineering Researchers : A View from Canada http://hdl.handle.net/2429/58265

Analyzing Fire Ignition Data in the Kamloops, Lillooet and Merritt fire zones : with implications toward the effects of fire suppression on the landscape http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59241

The landscape of rare cancer : a sea of opportunity http://hdl.handle.net/2429/59312

Interventions to Improve Patient Hand Hygiene : A Systematic Review http://hdl.handle.net/2429/60520

 

And, last but not least by any means, we were thrilled to add the first fourteen items from UBC President Santa Ono and we look forward to adding more this year!

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

In musical practice, there is an assortment of musical elements at “play”.

 

Just think. Real-time creative decision-making. Risk-taking. Collaboration.

 

So what happens when they all “play” together?

 

Improvisation! That is, musical improvisation.

 

“I’ll play it first and tell you what it’s called later.” – Miles Davis

 

The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) is known as “a central source for the collection and dissemination of research on the social implications of improvisational practices”.

 

Founded as a partnered research institute from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) project, “Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice” (ICASP), IICSI has its own research team. It consists of 58 scholars, students, creative practitioners, and community partners representing 20 different academic institutions including the University of British Columbia (UBC) and over 30 community-based organizations.

 

Together, they are “creating a vibrant intellectual hub and a focal point for leading-edge research and critical inquiry in the field of improvisation studies”. Through this network comes the following benefits such as ‘new technologies and models for practice-based research, knowledge transfers, new research, student training, and development of policies, instruments, and technologies’ to list just a few.

 

IICSI has three main strategic research priorities: 1) Improvisation as Practice-Based Research, 2) Improvisation, Community Health, and Social Responsibility, and 3) Improvisation, Intermediality, and Experimental Technologies.

 

Below is a quick soupçon of the IICSI sample research-intensive questions under current exploration:

 

Sample Research Questions re: 1)

How do arts-based improvisatory practices themselves suggest new models of knowledge transfer?

How might these practices help us measure the impact of our research activities, and how might they enable a broader range of stakeholders to engage with these activities?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 2)

How do improvisational arts-based practices contribute to the development and flourishing of healthy communities?

How (and to what extent) do these practices help communities (particularly at-risk and aggrieved populations) produce new understandings of identity, history, memory, and the body?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 3)

How can new technologies help facilitate the ability of communities to improvise across time, space, and ability limitations?

How might intermedial co-creation develop new opportunities for mobilizing knowledge?

 

With more research questions arising faster than they can be probed, it is good to know that IICSI has created an online research library housing a range of items such as films, articles, think pieces, and interviews.

 

At UBC, cIRcle is not only helping to disseminate IICSI research and make it openly accessible, it is also archiving and preserving this unique musical form of scholarly research for future scholars, practitioners and the general public.

 

Explore the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) Colloquium cIRcle collection via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal and stay tuned for more!

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

In musical practice, there is an assortment of musical elements at “play”.

 

Just think. Real-time creative decision-making. Risk-taking. Collaboration.

 

So what happens when they all “play” together?

 

Improvisation! That is, musical improvisation.

 

“I’ll play it first and tell you what it’s called later.” – Miles Davis

 

The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) is known as “a central source for the collection and dissemination of research on the social implications of improvisational practices”.

 

Founded as a partnered research institute from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) project, “Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice” (ICASP), IICSI has its own research team. It consists of 58 scholars, students, creative practitioners, and community partners representing 20 different academic institutions including the University of British Columbia (UBC) and over 30 community-based organizations.

 

Together, they are “creating a vibrant intellectual hub and a focal point for leading-edge research and critical inquiry in the field of improvisation studies”. Through this network comes the following benefits such as ‘new technologies and models for practice-based research, knowledge transfers, new research, student training, and development of policies, instruments, and technologies’ to list just a few.

 

IICSI has three main strategic research priorities: 1) Improvisation as Practice-Based Research, 2) Improvisation, Community Health, and Social Responsibility, and 3) Improvisation, Intermediality, and Experimental Technologies.

 

Below is a quick soupçon of the IICSI sample research-intensive questions under current exploration:

 

Sample Research Questions re: 1)

How do arts-based improvisatory practices themselves suggest new models of knowledge transfer?

How might these practices help us measure the impact of our research activities, and how might they enable a broader range of stakeholders to engage with these activities?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 2)

How do improvisational arts-based practices contribute to the development and flourishing of healthy communities?

How (and to what extent) do these practices help communities (particularly at-risk and aggrieved populations) produce new understandings of identity, history, memory, and the body?

 

Sample Research Questions re: 3)

How can new technologies help facilitate the ability of communities to improvise across time, space, and ability limitations?

How might intermedial co-creation develop new opportunities for mobilizing knowledge?

 

With more research questions arising faster than they can be probed, it is good to know that IICSI has created an online research library housing a range of items such as films, articles, think pieces, and interviews.

 

At UBC, cIRcle is not only helping to disseminate IICSI research and make it openly accessible, it is also archiving and preserving this unique musical form of scholarly research for future scholars, practitioners and the general public.

 

Explore the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) Colloquium cIRcle collection via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal and stay tuned for more!

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

Woodward Library’s new front entrance, which has been under construction since the end of December, has reopened as of August 8. A new front entrance was built to improve accessibility for disabled or handicapped visitors.

woodward space

The course reserves section has been considerably minimized, and a new space full of natural light created. It offers 33 study spaces and tables, a bar height counter and lounge chairs for comfortable studying. The space is already attracting students and Aleteia Greenwood, Head of Woodward Library, predicts the space will be jam-packed once the school year starts again. 

woodward space 

In addition to the new student-focused space, Greenwood says one of the most-needed new improvements was the creation of a consultation room for librarians. “We have faculty members and researchers that do consultation and research work with librarians, so this room is a perfect space for these meetings.” The new room is adjacent to the study area, and can be booked by librarians for consulting projects. 

The new study area also features the new Seed Lending Library cabinet which offers seeds for use. The seeds are available to anyone – for more information on the Seed Lending Library visit their website

Be sure to check out the new study space!

Photo credit: Guilhem Vellut @ Flickr

 

In 2002*, UBC`s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) first opened its doors and, then in 2008, it reopened anew in the finished Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

 

Back in the day, students mainly studied at study tables with notebooks and pens or pencils. Nowadays, students are studying with the “latest computer technology, a wireless network, peer programs and community events”.

 

 

“We chose to fund the Learning Commons because

we’ve always believed that people learn best when they are engaged in discussion,

sharing ideas and insights with one another.”

Kay and Lloyd Chapman, Benefactors

 

 

Thanks to the benefactors of the CLC, Mrs. Kay Scott Chapman (1917-2012) and Dr. Lloyd Chapman (1918-2004) and Suzanne Cates Dodson (1933 – 2014) and her husband Earl D. Dodson (1928 – 2009) and thanks to the benefactor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Dr. I. K. (Irving) Barber (1923 – 2012), they enabled the UBC community of students, faculty/staff and countless others to enjoy a wide variety of UBC events.

 

Great examples include local and international conferences, lectures and workshops, one-of-a-kind exhibits, special visits from national and international dignitaries to various royal visits over the years.

 

Explore more History of the Chapman Learning Commons

 

Read this article about “how UBC’s work is grounded in student development theory and cuts across traditional unit-based structures to be truly collaborative”

 

Delve into the Digital Tattoo Project and its “focus on supporting learners to make informed choices and extend their digital capabilities around online practices, safety and identity”

 

Peer into how student involvement makes for student success at UBC and beyond

 

Watch a recent video send-off by the CLC student team reflecting on their recent Learning Commons’ experiences!

_______________________________________________________________________________

Correction on May 20, 2017:

In 2002* (not 2012), UBC`s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) first opened its doors and, then in 2008, it reopened anew in the finished Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

staff at booth

Thank you to all the UBC students who came to the Library’s annual Chat and Chew Library Love booth last Thursday in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Visitors grabbed snacks and swag to help them with their finals, and dropped in for a pop-up photo booth.

The Library hosts a Library Love booth twice a year to share appreciation for library users of all kinds and to encourage communication about library services and spaces.

Follow our Facebook page to see the album of photos from the event, and be sure to join us for the next Library Love event in the fall!

 staff at booth

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet