Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC Reads Sustainability and the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Program.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his indigenous identity as a teenager and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability. Duncan McCue is the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue was a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. Now based in Toronto, his news and current affairs pieces continue to be featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National.

McCue’s work has garnered several RTNDA and Jack Webster Awards. He was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours including the Hillman Award for Investigative Journalism. McCue has spent years teaching journalism at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism and was recognized by the Canadian Ethnic Media Association with an Innovation Award for developing curriculum on Indigenous issues. He’s also an author: his book The Shoe Boy: A Trapline Memoir recounts a season he spent in a hunting camp with a Cree family in northern Quebec as a teenager. He was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (riic.ca). Before becoming a journalist, McCue studied English at the University of King’s College, then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. McCue is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario, and proud father of two children.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

The intrepid native reporter: Duncan McCue. Jones, M., Bear, J. and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2008).[Video/DVD] Vancouver: Moving Images Distribution.McCue, D., & Xwi7xwa Collection. [Link]

The shoe boy: A trapline memoir. New Westminster, British Columbia: Nonvella Publishing Inc. (2016). [Link]

Restorative justice: Capacity for forgiveness. McCue, D., Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2010).[Video/DVD] Toronto: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. [Link]


The Okanagan is known for its pristine lakes and rivers. Tourists visit the region for the scenery, vineyards, and abundant recreation opportunities that these waters provide. Residents rely on this water every day. But how clean is it, really? Wastewater, as well as chemical runoff from industry and agriculture, poses a threat to our freshwater supplies. How can we neutralize these threats without sacrificing our economic well-being? What steps can we take to ensure our most valuable resource remains clean and abundant for years to come.

Moderator

Chris Walker – Host, CBC’s Daybreak South

Panelists

Bruce Mathieson – Associate Professor, Biology, UBC’s Okanagan campus

Ivor Norlin – Manager of Infrastructure Programs, Interior Health, Health Protection

Anna Warwick Sears – Executive Director, Okanagan Basin Water Board

John_Robinson_Think_Tank_3_vid

It is a pleasure to announce that the Think Tank 3 Summary Report just arrived in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository! According to cIRcle statistics, it has been accessed and/or downloaded by the following “Top Country Views”: Canada, United States, Belgium, Australia, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom so far.

The report covers five core themes: operationalizing sustainability; enhancing human well-being; green venues/buildings; measurement and certification; and, business case of sustainability.

Its purpose is to “[e]nhance our understanding of how Universities, sport and community organizations can leverage sport and sustainability; [b]lend academic and practitioner views to explore innovative solutions, effect change, and create a return on investment; and, [b]ring together individuals from universities, community and sport organizations, primarily from Canada and the Pacific Northwest.”

Read the full report via cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/45598.

Did You Know?

In case you missed it, Professor John Robinson, Associate Provost of UBC Sustainability, presented strategies on sport and sustainability at the Think Tank 3: Program event. This event, hosted by the UBC Centre of Sport and Sustainability on 26-27 September 2013, can be viewed and/or downloaded in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/45586.



Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC Reads Sustainability. The Art of Fermentation is the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published. Sandor Katz presents the concepts and processes behind fermentation in ways that are simple enough to guide a reader through their first experience making sauerkraut or yogurt, and in-depth enough to provide greater understanding and insight for experienced practitioners. While Katz expertly contextualizes fermentation in terms of biological and cultural evolution, health and nutrition, and even economics, this is primarily a compendium of practical information—how the processes work; parameters for safety; techniques for effective preservation; troubleshooting; and more. With full-color illustrations and extended resources, this book provides essential wisdom for cooks, homesteaders, farmers, gleaners, foragers, and food lovers of any kind who want to develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for arguably the oldest form of food preservation, and part of the roots of culture itself. Readers will find detailed information on fermenting vegetables; sugars into alcohol (meads, wines, and ciders); sour tonic beverages; milk; grains and starchy tubers; beers (and other grain-based alcoholic beverages); beans; seeds; nuts; fish; meat; and eggs, as well as growing mold cultures, using fermentation in agriculture, art, and energy production, and considerations for commercial enterprises. Sandor Katz has introduced what will undoubtedly remain a classic in food literature, and is the first—and only—of its kind.

Biography

Sandor Ellix Katz is a self-taught fermentation experimentalist. Katz has taught hundreds of fermentation workshops across North America and beyond, taking on a role he describes as a “fermentation revivalist.” Now, in The Art of Fermentation, with a decade more experience behind him, the unique opportunity to hear countless stories about fermentation practices, and answering thousands of troubleshooting questions, he’s sharing a more in-depth exploration of the topic.


Select Books Available at UBC Library

Katz, Sandor Ellix. (2012). The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes From Around the World. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing. [Link]

Katz, Sandor Ellix. (2006). The Revolution Will Not Be Mirowaved: Inside America’s Underground Food Movements. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Food Science

Sustainability

Body Fit: Health, Nutrition and Fitness

In the UBC Fisheries Centre annual report for 2010-2011, Dr. Rashid Sumaila, Director and Professor of the UBC Fisheries Centre states:

The years 2010 and 2011 have been very exciting for those of us here at the Fisheries Centre. We welcomed two new faculty members, increasing the number of faculty at our Centre to twelve. First, we hired Dr Sang-Seon Yun, who comes to us from Kunsan National University in Korea, and is working with the Aboriginal Fisheries Research Unit in examining chemical communication systems of fishes. We also welcomed National Geographic Fellow Dr William W.L. Cheung, who obtained his PhD at UBC in 2007 and has returned to work on global change biology and fisheries.

The year 2011 also included the launch of a new website and visits from very distinguished guests thus helping the Fisheries Centre to ‘persevere in [its’] scholarly productivity and outreach efforts, with the goal of cultivating local and international fisheries awareness’.  Click on ‘View/Open’ to read the rest of the report in cIRcle at: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/43679.

Did you know?

There are 190+ items in the Fisheries Centre collections in cIRcle. Explore these titles – Modelling the trophic role of marine mammals in tropical areas (2009); Total marine fisheries extractions by country in the Baltic Sea: 1950-present (2010); Trade in seahorses and other syngnathids in countries outside Asia (1998-2001) (2011) and more. Or, browse the Fisheries Centre collections by Author, Title, Subjects and By Dept. Affiliation.


Hosted by the UBC Reads Sustainability Lecture Series. Ozzie Zehner is the author of Green Illusions and a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley. His recent publications include public science pieces in Christian Science Monitor, The American Scholar, The Humanist, The Futurist, Women’s Studies Quarterly and The Economist as well as educational resources in Green Technology (Sage, 2011) and Green Culture (Sage, 2011). Zehner’s research and projects over the previous two decades have been covered by CNN, MSNBC, USA Today, Science News Radio, The Washington Post, Business Week and numerous other media outlets. He also serves on the editorial board of Critical Environmentalism. Zehner primarily researches the social, political and economic conditions influencing energy policy priorities and project outcomes. His work also incorporates symbolic roles that energy technologies play within political and environmental movements. His other research interests include consumerism, urban policy, environmental governance, international human rights, and forgeries.


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC

Zehner, Ozzie. (2012). Keys to Future Energy Prosperity. The Futurist. 46(5). p. 37 [Link]

Zehner, Ozzie. (2012). Our Sustainable Future: Green Illusions: Dirty Secrets of Clean Energy and the Future of Environmentalism. University of Nebraska Press. [Link]

Zehner, Ozzie. (2012). Nuclear power’s unsettled future: a year after the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan, prospects for the nuclear power industry worldwide are far from certain. An energy policy scholar assesses the key economic, environmental, political, and psychological hinges on which nuclear power’s future now swings. The Futurist. 46(2). p. 17 [Link]


UBC Research Guides

Environmental Design

Environmental Engineering

Sustainability

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