Research Day showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

Questions about social media as sources of information about individuals (of different ages, genders, backgrounds) and communities, their uses in our personal and professional lives, and impact on our practices and overall well-being are central to the work of students and scholars across all our iSchool programs. Recognizing this common ground, this year’s Research Day will focus on the broad topic of “information, social media, and well-being,” considering the many connections social media now have with the way we do information, library, and archival studies.

This event happened on March 10, 2017.


Speaker:

Lyle Ungar, Professor of Computer And Information Science, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 200 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on eleven patents. His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including spectral methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

“Social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect portal onto people’s lives.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.”


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Smith, R. J., Crutchley, P., Schwartz, H. A., Ungar, L., Shofer, F., Padrez, K. A., & Merchant, R. M. (2017). Variations in Facebook Posting Patterns Across Validated Patient Health Conditions: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(1), e7. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Kern, M. L., Park, G., Eichstaedt, J. C., Schwartz, H. A., Sap, M., Smith, L. K., & Ungar, L. H. (2016). Gaining insights from social media language: Methodologies and challenges. [Link]

Sinnenberg, L., DiSilvestro, C. L., Mancheno, C., Dailey, K., Tufts, C., Buttenheim, A. M., … & Asch, D. A. (2016). Twitter as a Potential Data Source for Cardiovascular Disease Research. Jama cardiology, 1(9), 1032-1036. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Brooks, S. (05/01/2015). Computers in human behavior: Does personal social media usage affect efficiency and well-being? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.053 [Link]

Gerson, J., Plagnol, A. C., & Corr, P. J. (10/01/2016). Computers in human behavior: Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on facebook? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Computer Science

Information Visualization

 


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS). Citizens have been informally contributing to science for hundreds of years. One of the best known modern examples is of sightings by bird watchers. The Christmas Bird Count, an annual national count in the USA, is one hundred years old and birdwatching activities date back to even earlier times in the UK and parts of Europe. This data informs scientific studies of bird migration and behavior, which in turn provide evidence of habitat loss, and changes in weather patterns.

Citizens contribute to many branches of science from astronomy, to biochemistry, hydrology, biodiversity, personalized medicine, and more. Increasingly digital devices including cell phones, sensors, cameras, databases and associated techniques for storing, retrieving, and communicating data, and many types of social media have been integrated into citizen science and other volunteer practices. In this talk Professor Preece discusses a range of citizen science and volunteer projects focusing on the design of the technologies that support them and suggest some best practices for designing and motivating citizens to use these technologies.

BIO

Professor Jennifer Preece is a Professor and Dean at the University of Maryland’s iSchool She has researched usability and sociability design issues in online communities. Currently she has several research projects that focus on motivating participation in citizen science. She authored or coauthored three high-impact books: Human-Computer Interaction (1994), On-line Communities: Designing Usability, Supporting Sociability (2000), Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction (2002, 2007, 2011, 2015).

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