Since this April is National Poetry Month, we’ve gathered together selected poetry and related items from Open Collections for your enjoyment!

Our recently added Historical Children’s Literature Collection includes several poetry chapbooks. This chapbook, The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, includes beautiful engraved illustrations:

Roscoe, William. The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, 1807.

 

Roscoe, William. The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, 1807, p. 7.

 

Our BC Historical Books collection also contains several collections of poetry. Eric Duncan’s Rural rhymes and the sheep thief begins with the following disclaimer:

Duncan, Eric. Rural rhymes and the sheep thief, 1896, p. 7.

 

Here’s the first page of the first poem from the book, “A mosquito song”:

Duncan, Eric. “A mosquito song”. From Rural rhymes and the sheep thief, 1896, p. 11.

 

If you’re interested in Japanese poetry, check out our One Hundred Poets collection. This collection contains 74 books and 20 different card sets relating to the poetry anthology Hyakunin Isshu 百人一首 (One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each). You can read more about the collection in this previous blog post.

[Kinoya Hisomaro ; illustrated by Utagawa Kunisada, Utagawa Kuniyoshi], [Nishikie chūiri hyakunin isshu], [1849].

 

You may also be interested in the utagaruta card sets within this collection. You can find them here, and check out our previous blog post to learn more about how this game is played.

[One hundred poets card sheets], [Meiji period [1868-1912]].

 

This month is a great time to seek out poetry readings. We found this photo of Allen Ginsberg reading at UBC in 1963:

UBC 1.1/11341-2. Holborne, Peter. Allen Ginsberg reading poetry at UBC. August 2nd, 1963. Allen Ginsberg reading poetry at UBC.

 

Finally, check out this adorable poem about a cat interrupting a game of croquet:

Playing croquet, 1875.

Now that spring is well underway, we’re thinking about ways to enjoy the beautiful sunshine! For this post, we’ve gathered together our favourite images of bicycles from Open Collections.

Recently added to the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, this photograph album documents Clara Wilson’s cycling trips across Canada. Check out the full album for many more photos of her adventures!

Sproat Lake, 1940. From Clara Wilson’s photo album, [Ten Annual Cycling Trips, 1938-1947].

1st Bike Riding Lesson, July 1943. From Clara Wilson’s photo album, [Ten Annual Cycling Trips, 1938-1947].

 

As well as providing transportation, cycling can be a great social activity. Here’s a photograph of a women’s cycling club from 1907:

Cycling club and croquet lawn, 1907.

 

We enjoyed looking at this bicycle route map of Victoria, B.C., from 1897:

The Province pocket road map of Victoria and surroundings: compiled for the use of bicyclists from the government map, 1897.

 

Of course, with bikes, you don’t have to stay on the road. These postcards from the Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection depict cyclists on the beach and in the woods:

La plage à marée basse, 1919.

Le bois, 1906.

 

We found photos featuring tricycles, unicycles, and even a 15-wheel bicycle in Open Collections:

UBC 44.1/510. Dee, Martin. Participants in Science Week tricycle race, 1990.

Kong, Vincent. [Photograph of Stanley Kong].

UBC 44.1/2454. UBC engineering students on 15-seat bicycle built for Manulife Ride for Heart to raise funds for research, May 1991.

 

Finally, we loved finding these photos of bicyclists on and around campus – from the UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

UBC 41.1/1446-2. Lindner, Franz. Bicyclists on University Boulevard, 1978.

UBC 44.1/1886. Woman on bicycle, 2005.

This February 24 marks the 77th anniversary of Order-in-Council P.C. 1486, issued by Prime Minister Mackenzie King in 1942 to officially begin Japanese Canadian internment. All Japanese Canadians within 100 miles of the British Columbia coast – designated as a “protected area” – were forced to relocate east to the BC interior and other provinces, sometimes with only 24 hours to do so. In early March 1942, the British Columbia Security Commission was established to carry out the forced removal of Japanese Canadians. Vancouver’s Hastings Park was established as a temporary detainment center – detainees were housed in the Livestock Building – through which Japanese Canadians were routed before being moved to internment camps.

Tashme internment camp was located 14 miles southeast of Hope, BC. The 1200-acre site was originally named Fourteen Mile Ranch; the name “Tashme” was created from the names of three officers of the BC Security Commission. By May 1942, people were beginning to arrive at Tashme to begin housing construction:

Tashme Camp under construction, 1942

Construction at Tashme camp

 

In September 1942, families from Hastings Park began to arrive at Tashme, and the camp officially opened.

Japanese Canadians arriving at Tashme Camp

 

The forced removal was completed by the end of October 1942, and Hastings Park was closed. Construction at Tashme continued, including housing, bath houses, and a hospital. Farm buildings from the ranch were also renovated and repurposed. By January 1943, the camp had reached its peak population of over 2,600 residents. It was the largest BC internment camp.

Tashme Camp in winter

The hospital in winter [Tashme Camp], 1946

 

Over the next few years, Tashme functioned as a self-sufficient community. Photos in the Japanese Canadian Photograph Collection provide a glimpse of everyday life at Tashme:

View of Tashme camp

Group photograph of men at Tashme camp

Tashme Secondary School teachers, October 13 1943

Family picnics at Tashme Camp

Japanese boy with pet at Tashme Camp

 

The UBC Archives Photograph Collection also contains several photos of Tashme from the Margaret Sage fonds. Margaret Sage served as a social worker at Tashme from September 1945 to August 1946 and created a scrapbook of 97 photographs from that time.

 

Group photograph including Margaret Sage, [1946]

 

In 1945, the Canadian government gave Japanese Canadians the choice to either move east of the Rocky Mountains within Canada, or move to Japan – where many Japanese Canadians had never lived. Many Tashme residents chose “repatriation” to Japan. During this time, Japanese Canadians from other camps who opted for repatriation were also moved to Tashme. Margaret Sage’s scrapbook documents life in Tashme from 1945-1946, including photos of the repatriation process:

Loading the busses [Tashme camp], May 31 1946

Repatriation – Good bye – See you in Japan [Tashme Camp] , May 31 1946

[Japanese Canadians from Tashme Camp boarding train at Hope?], January 1 1946

 

If you’re interested in learning more about Tashme and Japanese internment, the Tashme Historical Project is an excellent resource. In addition, you can check out our previous blog posts featuring photos from the Japanese Canadian Photograph collection here. 

References

 

In the spirit of the holiday season, enjoy these wintery images from Open Collections.

Check out these beautiful photographs of a snowy UBC campus, from the UBC Archives Photograph collection:

Photograph by Leonard Frank, UBC 1.1/1299 Sundial in Botanical gardens in the snow, 1926.

UBC 23.1/67. UBC Library in the snow, [1948?].

UBC 1.1/2047. UBC campus snow scene, 1969.

 

From the Chung Collection, this 1928 Canadian Pacific Railway Company menu advertises various winter sports in Banff:

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Winter sports at Banff, 1928.

 

Also, check out this ski holidays poster from 1941:

Ewart, Peter. Banff-Lake Louise region Canadian Rockies via Canadian Pacific, 1941.

 

The Tremaine Arkley Croquet collection features retro Christmas cards:

[Christmas card depicting children playing croquet], [between 1910 and 1919?].

Bright and happy be your Christmas, [between 1890 and 1899?].

 

These photos from the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs show Vancouver and North Vancouver covered in snow:

Granville St., Vancouver, B.C., Jan 13 ’09, 1909.

Barrowclough, George Alfred. Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C. after fall of snow, [not before 1910].

Suspension Bridge, First Capilano Canyon, Vancouver, B.C., Length 450 Feet, [between 1924 and 1949?].

Wardlaw, John. Winter sports, Grouse Mountain Park, North Vancouver, B.C., [between 1922 and 1941?].

Barrowclough, George Alfred. A Winter Sunset on English Bay, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1910 and 1920?].

 

Finally, we hope you’re a bit warmer than these two today:

Bullock-Webster, Harry. 45° below zero–and he’s lost the matches, 1880.

Did you know that UBC’s Vancouver campus wasn’t always at Point Grey? Although Point Grey was selected as the site for the university in 1910, the outbreak of World War I necessitated the creation of a temporary campus, which opened in Fairview in 1915.

Except for the Arts building, the buildings at Fairview were temporary wooden constructions, nicknamed the “shacks” by students and faculty. The entire campus was contained within what is now the site of Vancouver General Hospital, between Laurel St. and Willow St. just south of 10th Ave.

The UBC Archives Photograph Collection contains many photographs of the Fairview campus buildings, shown below in order of construction. More buildings had to be added to accommodate the growing UBC enrolment, but even that was insufficient; professors resorted to holding classes in their own homes, or repeating the same lecture because rooms could not accommodate the entire class.

In 1922, students protested the deficiencies of the buildings and the lack of progress with Point Grey campus construction. This demonstration was known as the Great Trek, and successfully prompted construction to resume on the Point Grey campus.

Physics Building (1911)

Photograph by Leonard Frank, UBC 1.1/143. Fairview Physics Building, 1925.

 

UBC 11.1/9-4. Elementary physics laboratory at Fairview campus, 1919.

 

Machine Shop (1911)

UBC 11.1/11-2. The machine shop at Fairview campus, 1919.

 

Arts Building (1914)

Photograph by Leonard Frank, UBC 1.1/155. Arts building, 1925.

 

UBC 1.1/16567. View of Library reading room at Fairview Campus, 1919.

 

Geology Building (1915) and Mining Building (1915)

Photograph by Leonard Frank, UBC 1.1/142. Geology building, 1925.[Mining building in background.]

UBC 11.1/10-4. Short course students in geology classroom at Fairview campus, 1919.

 

Chemistry Building (1916)

UBC 156.1/021. Chemistry/Biology building at Fairview campus, 1920.

 

UBC 11.1/9-2. Chemistry laboratory at Fairview campus, 1919.

 

Assembly Hall (1916)

Photograph by Leonard Frank, UBC 1.1/156. Assembly hall/auditorium at Fairview, 1925.

 

Photograph by Regan and McMillan, UBC 1.1/15825-6. Interior view of Auditorium at Fairview campus, 1923.

 

Engine Building (Garage) (1918)

UBC 11.1-11/5. The Garage – Mechanical engineering at Fairview campus, 1919.

 

Forestry/Commerce (1918)

UBC 11.1/12-2. The Mill room, Forestry Dept. at Fairview campus, 1919.

 

Students’ Cafeteria (1918)

Photograph by Regan and McMillan, UBC 1.1/15825-8. Cafeteria at Fairview campus, 1923.

 

If you’re looking for a more in-depth look at early UBC history, check out the essay “From Humble Beginnings” from UBC Archives.

References

The FIFA World Cup is always an exciting event! This year, Russia will be hosting the games from June 14 to July 15, and 32 national teams will be participating. To get you into the sportive spirit, we selected some photos from our collection.

 

After years of preparation and practices…

Soccer team practice, 1940

 

Soccer team practice, 1940

 

The time to play has arrived!

Arts ’23 soccer team, 1921

 

People from all over the world will go to Russia to watch their players in action…

Soccer game in stadium, 1957

 

But most of us will watch TV to see the games and cheer for our preferred team.

Norman MacKenzie playing soccer

 

Exhibition soccer game, 1949

 

But only one will take the trophy at the end of the event!

Unidentified sports trophy

 

Take this month to enjoy watching some of the matches, because this tournament only happens once every four years.

February 12 is Family Day in British Columbia. While this statutory holiday was created in BC in 2013, falling on the second Monday every February, it has existed in other parts of Canada for even longer.

The very first province to observe Family Day as a statutory holiday was Alberta in 1990, when Family Day was created to give people the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones.

To celebrate the date, we’ve brought you some of our favorite family pictures from our collections.

 

When it comes to building families, often everything starts with a wedding.

[Chinese family wedding], 1940

 

Then, comes the kids

[Two boys dressed as sailors], 1940

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain, 1925-35?

 

Sometimes, several kids

[French family with ten children], 1920-29?

 

But there’s always space for one more

[Photograph depicting a family], 1879

 

Happy Family Day!

Shigetaka Sasaki family

 

F. K. Hare and family, 1968

 

The history behind the photos

Two boys dressed as sailors: the photo is part of an album from a Vancouver family. The album contains several registries from family’s travels across British Columbia and the United States, while also showcasing their life in Vancouver.

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain: the photo is part of an unknown family album from our Uno Langmann Collection. There are photos from British Columbia or Alberta and other locations not identified.

French family with ten children: the photo depicts a French family traveling on the Duchess of Bedford cruise of the Canadian Pacific Railways.

Shigetaka Sasaki family: Steve Shigetaka Sasaki was the top judoka in his province in Japan before he immigrated to Canada in 1922. He was the founder of the Vancouver Judo Club (Taiku Iku Dojo) and was known as the “Father of Judo in Canada”.

F. K. Hare and family: Frederick Kenneth Hare was a meteorologist and environmentalist. Hare was also the fifth president of the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

If you are interested in getting to know more about our collections, the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs have a lot of family photos from 1850s to the 1950s. You will be amazed to see those pictures, as we were.

 

Sources:

British Columbians reflect on the meaning of Family Day (CBC News)

F. Kenneth Hare (Science)

Family Day in Canada (Time and Date)

Former UBC president Kenneth Hare remembered (UBC)

History of Judo in Canada (Vernon Judo Club)

Shigetaka (Steve) Sasaki Family Fonds (Nikkei Museum)

February 12 is Family Day in British Columbia. While this statutory holiday was created in BC in 2013, falling on the second Monday every February, it has existed in other parts of Canada for even longer.

The very first province to observe Family Day as a statutory holiday was Alberta in 1990, when Family Day was created to give people the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones.

To celebrate the date, we’ve brought you some of our favorite family pictures from our collections.

 

When it comes to building families, often everything starts with a wedding.

[Chinese family wedding], 1940

 

Then, comes the kids

[Two boys dressed as sailors], 1940

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain, 1925-35?

 

Sometimes, several kids

[French family with ten children], 1920-29?

 

But there’s always space for one more

[Photograph depicting a family], 1879

 

Happy Family Day!

Shigetaka Sasaki family

 

F. K. Hare and family, 1968

 

The history behind the photos

Two boys dressed as sailors: the photo is part of an album from a Vancouver family. The album contains several registries from family’s travels across British Columbia and the United States, while also showcasing their life in Vancouver.

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain: the photo is part of an unknown family album from our Uno Langmann Collection. There are photos from British Columbia or Alberta and other locations not identified.

French family with ten children: the photo depicts a French family traveling on the Duchess of Bedford cruise of the Canadian Pacific Railways.

Shigetaka Sasaki family: Steve Shigetaka Sasaki was the top judoka in his province in Japan before he immigrated to Canada in 1922. He was the founder of the Vancouver Judo Club (Taiku Iku Dojo) and was known as the “Father of Judo in Canada”.

F. K. Hare and family: Frederick Kenneth Hare was a meteorologist and environmentalist. Hare was also the fifth president of the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

If you are interested in getting to know more about our collections, the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs have a lot of family photos from 1850s to the 1950s. You will be amazed to see those pictures, as we were.

 

Sources:

British Columbians reflect on the meaning of Family Day (CBC News)

F. Kenneth Hare (Science)

Family Day in Canada (Time and Date)

Former UBC president Kenneth Hare remembered (UBC)

History of Judo in Canada (Vernon Judo Club)

Shigetaka (Steve) Sasaki Family Fonds (Nikkei Museum)

The 2018 Winter Olympics are starting this week! They are going to be hosted by PyeongChang in South Korea, beginning on February 9, 2018. For 16 days, we will see the best winter sports athletes in the world compete for gold.

To get into the sportive spirit, we selected a few materials from our collection that show off some of the Olympic winter sports.

 

Freestyle skiing 

An advertisement from our Chung Collection: 

Banff-Lake Louise region Canadian Rockies via Canadian Pacific, 1941

 

Ice hockey 

A photograph from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Hockey players, Ritz brothers, 1939

 

Bobsleigh

A selection from a family album in our Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

[Group on sled], 1928

Curling

An action shot from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Pharmacy dean Bernard Riedel curling, 1979

 

Skating

A photograph from our Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

Skating on Trout Lake, Vancouver, B.C., 1925

 

While researching images for this post, we found plenty of other materials involving outdoor activities in winter. While these activities may not be Olympic sports, they are certainly a workout.

 

Snowshoeing, from our H. Bullock-Webster Fonds:

December – soft snow – misery, 1880

 

Snow shoveling, from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Youth Training School snow shoveling, 1951

 

Grab your mittens and get ready to cheer on your favorite athletes, because the Winter Olympics only come once every four years.

It’s decidedly autumn here on the Vancouver campus of UBC. Chilly walks, a desire for soups, and some costume scheming are in the ether. If you’re looking for some inspiration, here are a few from Open Collections.

 

(Pop)Culturally Appropriate, a clown from the Ubyssey:

Ubyssey cover October 31, 2003 featuring a close up picture of a clown

 

This photo from 1919 is a little far away, but there are some great hats throughout. Perhaps something Newsies-related would capture the time:

Group photograph of the 1919 "High Jinks" costume party

Group photograph of the 1919 “High Jinks” costume party

In1984, George Pedersen wore a Superman Costume. Bonus points for anyone who can pinpoint where on campus this photo was taken:

George Pedersen in Superman costume

George Pedersen in Superman costume

Of course, the theatre department has no shortage of costumes. Here, Joy Coghill for a performance of The Visit:

Joy Coghill in costume from production of "The Visit" 1964

Joy Coghill in costume from production of “The Visit” 1964

 

Regardless of costume, you can donate food at UBC Library for a reduction of fines:

Lica Chui, Charles Slonecker and Carole Forsythe with food collected by U.B.C. students

Lica Chui, Charles Slonecker and Carole Forsythe with food collected by U.B.C. students

 

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