UBC Library is pleased to announce that Eleanore Wellwood, Wendy Traas and Anne Lama are the 2018 recipients of UBC Library Recognition Awards. Each year, the Library Awards Program shines a light on those employees who have demonstrated exceptional creativity, innovation, excellence and a dedication to customer service through their work.

The awards were presented at the annual Library Recognition Luncheon at the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre on June 19, 2018. Congratulations Eleanore, Wendy and Anne, and thank you to everyone who participated by submitting nominations.

Eleanore Wellwood, University Librarian Susan E. Parker, and Anne Lama.


Eleanore Wellwood

Eleanore Wellwood

Eleanore Wellwood (Technical Services Library Assistant, Xwi7xwa Library) is honoured as this year’s Unsung Hero. Our Unsung Heroes keep the Library’s programs, services, and infrastructure running smoothly, and when they do their jobs well, their work is seamless and often goes unnoticed.

A clear example of inveterate dedication, Eleanore delayed her own retirement in order to help her branch catch up on major collections projects, and her efforts and knowledge have resulted in increased findability of materials within her branch.

Wendy Traas

Wendy Traas

Wendy Traas (Reference Librarian, Education Library) is the winner of the Innovation Award, which recognizes the achievements of Library employees who bring uncommon creativity to their work. Recipients of this award often apply new ways of thinking to existing processes or seek to expand or enhance the delivery of services and expertise across our campus community.

Through her work, Wendy demonstrates imagination and risk-taking, but also a pragmatic and strategic vision. She has innovation as the heart and soul of her DNA, and her desire for improvement in information literacy led to her award of a $18,000 TLEF grant.

Anne Lama

Anne Lama

Anne Lama (Conservator, Technical Services) earned the Employee Excellence Award, which is given to those whose track record for quality work is matched only by the kindness, compassion, and respect that make their contributions so effective.

An essential service partner in every major collections project the Library undertakes, Anne is also strongly committed to teaching, learning and mentorship. She takes every question as an opportunity to develop awareness of our individual and joint responsibility to care for our collections.

The UBC Library Digitization Centre is celebrating another birthday: seven years! In many cultures and religions, seven is a special—and sometimes lucky—number. There are seven continents, seven seas, seven classic world wonders, and seven colors in the rainbow.

For everyone at the Digitization Centre, seven years also marks many proud milestones.

  • Over 50 collections
  • Over 30 partners and supporters, from UBC, British Columbia, Canada or other countries like China and Japan
  • Over 200 thousand unique digital objects
  • Over 380 thousand downloads of our items
  • Over 8 million views of our collections

Looking back, our first projects were ambitious in their scope, but focused on topics close to home. They included the digitization of BC’s historical newspapers, the Japanese-Canadian newspaper Tairiku Nippo, and UBC Institute of Fisheries Field Records.

The British Columbian, Feb. 6, 1886

 

Today, our collections provide access to primary sources from all over the world, as well as our many more local communities, including:

Get to know even more histories in our international collections—such as Chinese Rare Books Collection and Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era—and access Open Collections.

While our collections are accessed mainly by residents of Canada, interest has been growing. In the last year alone, we’ve had visitors to our website from the United States, United Kingdom, China, Japan, India, and other countries.

 

Google Analytics Map, from Jan. 1, 2017 to Jan. 31, 2018

 

Our team’s mission is to support and enrich the educational, cultural and economic endeavors of the University, the people of British Columbia and communities beyond. Thanks to the support of our amazing partners here at UBC and throughout the world, as well as the dedication of our many student workers, we have accomplished a phenomenal amount of work and will continue to thrive in that mission.

Thank you all for the past seven years, and the next seven to come!

 

Sources

Woolman, J. Advancing the digital agenda (UBC Library)

Derbyshire, D. Why ‘lucky 7’ really is the world’s magic number (Daily Mail)

Documentation (UBC Library Digital Initiatives)

Stibravy, R. The UBC Library Digitization Centre: our equipment and its uses (Slideshare)

UBC Library has now completed its Harry Potter collection of original first editions with the recent acquisition of a U.K. first edition, first printing of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

The library’s Rare Books and Special Collections department has been building a collection of first edition Harry Potter books since spring 2015 as part of the Arkley Collection of Early Historical Children’s Literature, which is focused on popular works.

“As the most popular children’s literature series in several generations, with global impact equaling Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Harry Potter is an important series in the children’s literature canon,” says Chelsea Shriver, UBC Rare Books and Special Collections Librarian.

Although the first Harry Potter book was published just over 20 years ago, the U.K. first edition, first printing is rare and difficult to obtain. The original print run was only 500 copies, 300 of which went directly into libraries and were never intended for sale. The latest book in the collection was purchased with money from a number of library collections funds including endowments and donations from a 2017 crowdfunding campaign.

“We are proud to join the ranks of institutions such as Princeton, Yale, the British Library, and Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries in bringing this very scarce book to UBC,” says Katherine Kalsbeek Head of Rare Books and Special Collections. “Collecting and preserving the Harry Potter series will ensure that scarce first and special editions of these works can be properly cared for and made accessible for future generations.”

UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections offers weekly drop-in tours every Wednesday, for students, faculty, and the general public to come in and see the collections in person.

 

 

News Release from Government of Canada’s Innovation Supercluster Initiative:

 

“It is an exciting and historic time for innovation in Canada. The Digital Technology Supercluster is a generational opportunity – one that holds significant promise for companies in BC and across Canada,” says Bill Tam, Co-Chair of Canada’s Digital Technology Supercluster consortium. “Now the important work begins. As a collective, we’ll apply data and use technology in new ways, such as mixed reality, which can digitally transform companies, solve industry problems and advance economic opportunities throughout BC, Canada and the world.”

Canada’s Digital Technology Supercluster Consortium is a cross-industry inititiave dedicated to ensuring BC and Canada are leaders in the digital economy. It is proudly based out of British Columbia, with partners from (and benefits that will be felt across) the nation. The consortium includes founding members AMPD, Augurex, Avcorp, Business Council of BC, BC Tech Association, Change Healthcare, D-Wave, Lifesciences BC, Microsoft, Providence Health Care (supported by St. Paul’s Foundation), Premiers’ Technology Council of BC, Research Universities’ Council members (UBC, SFU, UVic, UNBC with Emily Carr and BCIT), Teck, Telus, Terramera, Timberwest, Urthecast and Wavefront.

 

Read the full press release

 

 

Explore scholarly research in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the UBC Library Open Collections’ portal

 

 

 

 

 

News Release from Government of Canada’s Innovation Supercluster Initiative:

 

“It is an exciting and historic time for innovation in Canada. The Digital Technology Supercluster is a generational opportunity – one that holds significant promise for companies in BC and across Canada,” says Bill Tam, Co-Chair of Canada’s Digital Technology Supercluster consortium. “Now the important work begins. As a collective, we’ll apply data and use technology in new ways, such as mixed reality, which can digitally transform companies, solve industry problems and advance economic opportunities throughout BC, Canada and the world.”

Canada’s Digital Technology Supercluster Consortium is a cross-industry inititiave dedicated to ensuring BC and Canada are leaders in the digital economy. It is proudly based out of British Columbia, with partners from (and benefits that will be felt across) the nation. The consortium includes founding members AMPD, Augurex, Avcorp, Business Council of BC, BC Tech Association, Change Healthcare, D-Wave, Lifesciences BC, Microsoft, Providence Health Care (supported by St. Paul’s Foundation), Premiers’ Technology Council of BC, Research Universities’ Council members (UBC, SFU, UVic, UNBC with Emily Carr and BCIT), Teck, Telus, Terramera, Timberwest, Urthecast and Wavefront.

 

Read the full press release

 

 

Explore scholarly research in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via the UBC Library Open Collections’ portal

 

 

 

Read our highlights from the past fiscal year which include growing our collections, improving student spaces, connecting research to the community and engaging with our community partners.

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

At the University of British Columbia (UBC), the ‘highest calibre [of] research faculty and students’ create, innovate and inspire while they work and study at its two campuses located in Vancouver and in the Okanagan Valley. According to UBC 2016/17 figures, it ‘secures approximately $600 million in research funding each year with 199 companies spun off from UBC research; 1,326 research projects with industry partners; and 1,172 research contracts and agreements with government and non-profits’.

 

If you are looking for an openly accessible collection of such published and unpublished scholarly research by the UBC faculty community and its partners, take a moment to learn more about this notable one.

 

The UBC Faculty of Research and Publications collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository showcases all types of content ranging from grant-funded research datasets to text files of preprint and postprint articles, case studies, technical reports, working papers, book reviews, conference proceedings and summaries to audio and video recording files to historical photographs of people, places, and objects.

 

With 3,521 items now and counting, the oldest item found in this collection was published back in 1929. More recently, one of the newest items found in cIRcle was a journal article published just this year by UBC authors from these interdisciplinary areas: Faculty of Arts, Library, Faculty of Medicine, School of Journalism and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

This collection covers a broad range of both historical and current thematic subjects such as air pollution, Canada, community environmental health, forest productivity, genocide, health human resources, HIV, homelessness, medical technology, monuments and memorials, prisoners, war, workplace health, and much more. So far, the latest top country views and downloads originate from the United States, Canada, China, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Republic of Korea, Australia, India, and the Netherlands.

 

Part of this unique collection is the Adam Jones Global Photo Archive created by UBC Okanagan professor Adam Jones, head of International Relations at UBC’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. He is known as a “[g]lobetrotter, acclaimed author, and genocide expert” who has visited more than 103 countries to date.

 

One newly added item garnering media attention this month is a report written by UBC professor and Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Cancer Primary Prevention, Dr. Carolyn Gotay et al. She provides an update on the activities of the Breast Cancer Prevention & Risk Assessment Clinic in British Columbia. So far, it has received 1,369 views from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Iran, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Japan.

 

Another part of this growing collection includes the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Also known as the UBC Learning Exchange, MRAi is a community engagement initiative based in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Did you know that the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is a funding partner and contributor of MRAi? With new items added nearly everyday, there are currently over 150 faculty research articles and other community-sourced historical materials from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which are now openly accessible in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

At the University of British Columbia (UBC), the ‘highest calibre [of] research faculty and students’ create, innovate and inspire while they work and study at its two campuses located in Vancouver and in the Okanagan Valley. According to UBC 2016/17 figures, it ‘secures approximately $600 million in research funding each year with 199 companies spun off from UBC research; 1,326 research projects with industry partners; and 1,172 research contracts and agreements with government and non-profits’.

 

If you are looking for an openly accessible collection of such published and unpublished scholarly research by the UBC faculty community and its partners, take a moment to learn more about this notable one.

 

The UBC Faculty of Research and Publications collection in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository showcases all types of content ranging from grant-funded research datasets to text files of preprint and postprint articles, case studies, technical reports, working papers, book reviews, conference proceedings and summaries to audio and video recording files to historical photographs of people, places, and objects.

 

With 3,521 items now and counting, the oldest item found in this collection was published back in 1929. More recently, one of the newest items found in cIRcle was a journal article published just this year by UBC authors from these interdisciplinary areas: Faculty of Arts, Library, Faculty of Medicine, School of Journalism and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

This collection covers a broad range of both historical and current thematic subjects such as air pollution, Canada, community environmental health, forest productivity, genocide, health human resources, HIV, homelessness, medical technology, monuments and memorials, prisoners, war, workplace health, and much more. So far, the latest top country views and downloads originate from the United States, Canada, China, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Republic of Korea, Australia, India, and the Netherlands.

 

Part of this unique collection is the Adam Jones Global Photo Archive created by UBC Okanagan professor Adam Jones, head of International Relations at UBC’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. He is known as a “[g]lobetrotter, acclaimed author, and genocide expert” who has visited more than 103 countries to date.

 

One newly added item garnering media attention this month is a report written by UBC professor and Canadian Cancer Society Chair in Cancer Primary Prevention, Dr. Carolyn Gotay et al. She provides an update on the activities of the Breast Cancer Prevention & Risk Assessment Clinic in British Columbia. So far, it has received 1,369 views from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, Iran, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Japan.

 

Another part of this growing collection includes the Making Research Accessible Initiative (MRAi). Also known as the UBC Learning Exchange, MRAi is a community engagement initiative based in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Did you know that the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is a funding partner and contributor of MRAi? With new items added nearly everyday, there are currently over 150 faculty research articles and other community-sourced historical materials from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside which are now openly accessible in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

 

Are you a UBC researcher? Click here to add your research to cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News Release from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC):

 

Research is at the heart of understanding the challenges and opportunities people face in areas such as education, immigration and technology. That’s why the Government of Canada continues to support the work of our country’s social scientists and humanities researchers. The evidence they produce informs policies that improve our understanding of each other and our communities.

To support their efforts, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced today more than $265 million in funding for over 3,300 social sciences and humanities research projects across Canada.

 

The funding is being awarded through scholarships, fellowships, and grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), one of the three federal granting councils responsible for supporting researchers whose work helps fuel a stronger economy, healthy communities and a growing middle class.

 

Read the full press release

 

See the Award Recipients‘ list

 

 

Explore UBC’s Tri-Agency Open Access Policy here

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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