susan Parker

Ms. Susan E. Parker. Photo: Don Leibig, UCLA Photography

 

In September 2017, UBC will welcome Susan E. Parker as University Librarian for a five-year term. Ms. Parker currently holds the role of Deputy University Librarian at the University of California, Los Angeles where she leads operations, human resources, assessment, budgeting, strategic planning, capital project planning and fundraising.

Ms. Parker will take over leadership of UBC Library at a pivotal time as the 2015-2017 Strategic Plan comes to a close and the library develops new strategic priorities in alignment with UBC’s new strategic plan. At UCLA, Ms. Parker led the processes behind the library’s strategic plans for 2006-2009 and 2012-2019.

“Susan Parker’s reputation in the library community is one of solid competence and professionalism,” said Melody Burton, Interim University Librarian. “We are thrilled to have her join UBC Library at this particular time.”

Ms. Parker holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in History and American Literature, a Master of Arts in History, and a Master of Library Science with a specialization in academic librarianship. Her research interests include leadership in academic libraries and higher education, organization theory, and the concept of “credible optimism” emphasizing the importance of positivity in the pursuit of realistic and sustainable goals.

“Being named University Librarian at UBC is an honour, and the highlight of my career,” says Susan Parker. “I look forward to partnering with UBC’s excellent library staff, students, and faculty as we continue to develop and deliver outstanding services, scholarly resource collections, and welcoming library facilities for the UBC community.”

In July 2016 Melody Burton stepped into the role of Interim University Librarian, in addition to her role as Deputy University Librarian. Over the past year Ms. Burton has been focused on a “domestic agenda” to build relationships on campus and set the table for the next University Librarian.

“I wish to express my gratitude to Ms. Melody Burton for her service as the Interim University Librarian since July 2016,” said Dr. Angela Redish, UBC Provost and VP Academic pro tem. “Her work has been integral to the continuity of the library’s strong leadership over the past year.” 

Ms. Burton will continue in this interim role until September 1, when Ms. Parker joins UBC.

 

Read the full announcement from the Office of the Provost and VP Academic.

 

UBC Data Librarians in 1975- current librarians appear in colour.

 

 

 

Not surprisingly, we at the Digitization Centre are a big fan of analytics. Data about how people use the data and images we produce? Our knees are weak. What we’ve learned is that our blog post from 2013 regarding the BC Historical Newspapers Collection is one of the most often used, so an update including the last four years of work seems appropriate. Without futher ado:

 

 

 

 

These titles and date ranges are current as of the publication of this blog post- for the most current list, please see: https://open.library.ubc.ca/collections/bcnewspapers

Newspapers Available:

Newspaper Name  Date Range (Not all dates will have newspapers)
Abbotsford Post 1859—1994
Advance — Midway 1897—1927
Agassiz Record 1923—1924
Alberni Advocate 1912—1915
Anaconda News 1901—1927
Armstrong Advance 1903—1096
Arrow Lakes Advocate 1914
Atlin Claim 1899—1913
British Columbia Lumberman 1866—1913
Bella Coola Courier 1912—1917
Bennett Sun 1899—1921
Boundary Creek Times and Greenwood Weekly Times 1865—1935
British Columbia Labor News 1921—1922
British Columbia News 1866—1927
British Columbia Record 1916—1920
British Columbia Tribune 1866
Brooklyn News 1898
Canford Radium 1917
Cariboo Sentinel 1865—1875
Cascade Record 1898—1901
Cassiar News 1919
Chase Tribune 1912—1946
Chilliwack Free Press  1911—1912
Coalmont Courier  1912
Coast Miner  1899—1900
Coast News 1945—1994
Courtenay Review  1912—1918
Courtenay Weekly News  1892—1896
Cranbrook Herald  1898—1927
Cranbrook Prospector  1905—1917
Creston Review 1908—1975
Crofton Gazette and Cowichan News 1902—1906
Cumberland Islander  1910—1931
Cumberland News 1896—1931
Daily Building Record  1911—1920
Daily Telegram 1890—1929
Delta News 1902—1910
Delta Times 1903—1914
Despatch  1904
District Ledger — Fernie  1983—1920
Duncan Enterprise  1900, 1903, 1914
East Kootenay Miner  1897—1898
Echo  1907—1908
Enderby Press and Walker’s Weekly  1908—1921
Evening Kootenaian  1898
Evening Telegraph  1866—1921
Evening World  1884—1930
Express  1905—1912
Fernie Ledger  1905—1907
Fraser Advance  1907
General Conference Daily Bulletin  1910
Glenora News  1898
Golden Era  1893—1902
Golden Times  1907—1909
Grand Forks Miner  1896—1898
Grand Forks Sun  1901—1927
Greater Vancouver Chinook  1912—1917
Greenwood Miner  1899—1901
Hazelton Queek  1880—1881
Hedley Gazette  1904—1917
Hosmer Times  1909—1910
Hot Springs News  1891—1892
Independent — Vancouver 1900—1903
Industrial World  1899—1901
Kamloops Wawa  1891—1918
Kelowna Record and Orchard City Record  1908—1920
Keremeos Chronicle  1908—1909
Kootenay Liberal  1908
Kootenay Mail  1894—1905
Kootenay Star 1890—1894
Labour Star 1918—1919
Ladysmith Daily Ledger 1904—1906
Lardeau Eagle 1900—1904
Lardeau Mining Review 1904—1907
Leader—Advocate 1923
Ledge — Fernie 1904—1905
Ledge — Nakusp 1893—1894
Ledge — Nelson  1904
Ledge — New Denver 1894—1904
Lillooet Advance 1910—1911
Lowery’s Claim 1901—1906
Mail Herald 1905—1917
Marysville Tribune 1901—1902
Massett Leader 1912—1913
Miner — Nelson 1890—1898
Mining Review 1897—1903
Mission City News 1893
Morrissey Mention 1916
Morrissey Miner 1902—1903
Moyie Leader 1898—1911
Mt. Pleasant Advocate 1903—1907
Nanaimo Courier 1889
Nanaimo Mail 1896
Nelson Daily Miner 1898—1902
Nelson Economist 1897—1906
Nelson Weekly Miner 1899
New Westminster Daily News 1906—1914
New Westminster Times 1859—1861
Nicola Herald 1904—1909
Nicola Valley News 1910—1916
Nugget 1903—1904
Okanagan Mining Review 1893
Omineca Herald 1908—1912
Omineca Miner 1911—1918
Pacific Canadian 1893—1917
Paystreak 1896—1902
Penninsula Times 1963—1979
Penticton Press 1907—1909
Phoenix Pioneer 1899—1916
Port Essington Loyalist 1908—1909
Port Moody Gazette 1883—1887
Prince Rupert Journal 1910—1917
Prince Rupert Optimist 1909—1911
Prospector (Rossland) 1895
Prospector — Fort Steele 1898—1905
Quartz Creek Miner 1897
Queen Charlotte Islander 1911—1914
Red Flag 1918—1919
Revelstoke Herald 1896—1905
San Francisco Journal 1884—1888
Saturday World  1903
Silvertonian 1897—1901
Slocan Drill 1900—1905
Slocan Mining Review 1906
Slocan Prospector  1894—1895
Slocan Record 1911
Star 1908
Sun 1907—1908
Surrey Times 1895
The North Coast 1907—1908
The Wave — Victoria 1900
Tribune—Nelson 1892—1903
Vancouver Building Record 1911
West Forks News 1901
Western Call 1909—1916
Western Clarion 1904—1923
Westward Ho 1886
Ymir Herald 1904—1905
Ymir Miner 1898
Ymir Mirror 1903—1904

Please let us know in the comments if you access the papers, and anything interesting that you find! We are still digitizing newspapers from all over British Columbia, with no end in sight.

 

 

This year, two acclaimed UBC researchers are among a select few distinguished recipients who are being honoured for their lifetime achievements. Congratulations to both of them!

 

“[My] research focusses on pictorial representation and perception;

the aesthetic and epistemic value of pictures, including scientific images;

theories of art and its value; the ontology of art; computer art and new art forms;

and aesthetic value, wherever it may be found.”

– Dr. Dominic McIver Lopes, Humanities, University of British Columbia

 

One of the six Killam Research Fellow recipients is Dr. Dominic McIver Lopes, a UBC scholar and professor, who is “one of the foremost contemporary philosophers of art” whose “work focuses on the nature and significance of art and the aesthetic”.  While he previously was a Guggenheim Fellow, a fellow of the National Humanities Center as well as a Leverhulme Visiting Research Professor at the University of Warwick, he also held other visiting positions in Florida, Japan, Italy, and France. He has also won two other teaching awards, the Philosophical Quarterly Essay Prize and the American Society for Aesthetics Outstanding Monograph Prize.

Learn more about Dr. Lopes here

 

 

“If anything helped me to move forward in my career,

it was the curiosity to look behind every open door.”

– Dr. Julio Montaner, Health Sciences, University of British Columbia

 

Among the five scholars receiving the Killam Prize this year is Dr. Julio Montaner, a UBC physician, scientist, and advocate, who provides leadership in the international HIV/AIDS research community. He was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada-The Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences (RSC) and the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in 2015 and has received many awards and recognition during his lifelong career including these notable ones: the Canadian Institutes of Health’s Knowledge Translation Award, Prix Galien Award, Albert Einstein World of Science Award, and The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for contributions to the field of HIV/AIDS, to name just a few.

Find research by Dr. Montaner here

 

 

About The Killam Program:

  • Generously funded by Mrs. Dorothy J. Killam in memory of her husband, Izaak Walton Killam, the Killam awards make up part of the Killam Trusts
  • Established in 1967, the Killam Research Fellowships were created and, in 1981, the Killam Prizes were inaugurated
  • The Killam trusts “fund scholarship and research at four Canadian universities, a neurological research and clinical institute and the Canada Council”
  • Approximate value of the Killam Trusts is $425 million with a Canada Council portion of $55 million

 

About the Killam Prizes:

  • Recognizing outstanding Canadian scholars and scientists in industry, government agencies or universities for their pioneer work in the advancement of research
  • Five annual prizes of $100,000 are awarded (1 prize each in the fields of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, and engineering)

 

Learn about UBC Killam Awards and Fellowships here

 

 

Explore more UBC research awards here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Killam Trusts

Experience Some of the Best of UBC

Offered on Saturdays in the fall and winter terms at the UBC Point Grey campus, One Day @ UBC single-day courses provide easy and affordable access to top experts in their field – and the small class size ensures ample opportunities for discussion. One Day @ UBC courses can be applied toward a UBC Certificate in Liberal Studies.

Sign up to UBC Continuing Studies’ email subscription list to receive valuable news and updates about its upcoming courses, too.


Course List

Calling Cartographers: Learn Open Source Geographic Information Systems

Diabetes: How interactions between our Genes and Environment Cause a Global Epidemic

Egypt and the Bible: Cultural Contact in Literature, Religion and Art

Object Lessons, Object Questions: A One Day Experiment @ MOA

Politics, Literature and Painting through Three Women of the 20th Century: Evita Peron, Gabriela Mistral and Frida Kahlo

Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: How Can We Best Produce our Food?

Sleep: Your Other Life

Thor and Company: Old Norse Mythology through the Ages

 

 

medtalks_757x422-560x312

Presented by UBC Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, and Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, in partnership with alumni UBC

The sequencing of the human genome has been hailed as a scientific breakthrough in that it has opened the human genetic blueprint to investigations of all questions ranging from human origins to the understanding of health and complex diseases.  As a result of this revolutionary sequencing of human genomes, our knowledge about how and why we differ from each other as well as how interactions between genes and culture have shaped our community is now more clearly understood. How can this knowledge be used to improve human health through disease prevention, diagnosis and personalized treatment approaches? What does the Genomics Revolution mean for you and your health? What is the potential for future generations?

Join UBC’s Faculties of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in partnership with alumni UBC, to hear from five top UBC researchers and learn about the work they are doing to accelerate the genomics revolution which is advancing their fields.

 


Moderator

Dr. Catalina Lopez-Correa

Panelists & Talks

Dr. Jehannine Austin – Genetic counseling: the key to unlocking the potential health and economic benefits of human genomics?

Dr. Martin Dawes – It is not just the genetics that is difficult – the translation to everyday practice is really hard.

Dr. Howard Lim – Personalized Care in Oncology – Pitfalls and Successes

Dr. Corey Nislow – Only in the Light of Evolution: Cells, Organisms, and Pharmacology

Dr. Chris Overall – Can Proteomics Fill the Gap between Genomics and Phenotypes? The Human Proteome Project.


Speaker Biographies

Dr. Catalina Lopez-Correa

Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Sectors, Genome BC

catalina-lopez-correa-320x486In January 2016, Dr. Catalina Lopez-Correa joined Genome BC as Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Sectors. With over 18 years of international experience in both the academic and private sectors, Dr. Lopez-Correa brings her deep understanding of genomics to the Genome BC leadership team.

Dr. Lopez-Correa holds an MD from UPB University in Colombia, a Masters in Genetics from Paris VII/Pasteur Institute and a PhD in Medical Biosciences-Genetics from KULeuven in Belgium. Most recently she was the Vice-President and CSO, Scientific Affairs, at Genome Quebec where she was instrumental in developing competitive teams for national and provincial research projects, and raising the profile of Genome Quebec on the global stage.

Previous experience also includes a role as Senior Scientist with Eli Lilly and Company. During Dr. Lopez-Correa’s time at Eli Lilly, she was part of the Pharmacogenomics and Translational Medicine Group in charge of discovering and validating genetic/genomic biomarkers in different therapeutic areas (oncology, cardio-metabolic and neurosciences). She also helped develop the company’s tailored therapeutics and personalized medicine strategy.  Dr. Lopez-Correa also held the position of Head of Cytogenomics laboratory at deCODE genetics where she developed screening strategies to detect genomic rearrangements. She has also worked for two different American biotech companies in the UK (Genomica and Informax).

Since 2002, Dr. Lopez-Correa has served as evaluator for large multinational projects funded by the European Commission, the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiatives) and the NIH and has been recognized by several awards nationally and internationally. As part of her commitment to international development, Dr. Lopez-Correa funded the not for profit organization ODNS (Organisation pour le Développement avec des Nouvelles Solidarités) in 2012 and has been involved in several initiatives aimed at demonstrating the impact of genomics in developing countries.

Dr. Jehannine Austin

Associate Professor, UBC Department of Medical Genetics; Canada Research Chair in Translational Psychiatric Genomics; Acting Head, Department of Psychiatry, UBC Faculty of Medicine

 

Genetic counseling: the key to unlocking the potential health and economic benefits of human genomics?

The conditions that are most common in humans (e.g. cancer, psychiatric illness, diabetes, heart disease) are complex – that is,jehannine-austin-320x214 they arise as a result of interactions between genetic and environmental influences. Lifestyle modifications (e.g. quitting smoking, exercise, nutrition) can reduce the risk for these conditions, but studies show that providing people with information about their genetic risk does not reliably provoke adoption of healthy behaviours that can reduce risk. This talk will focus on the role of genetic counseling in personalized prevention approaches to common complex disease by empowering people to act on genomic risk information to engage in risk reduction behaviours.

BIO: Jehannine completed her BSc (Hons, Biochemistry) at Bath University, and her PhD in Neuropsychiatric Genetics at the University of Wales College of Medicine in the UK before completing training as a Genetic Counselor at UBC in 2003. She was first appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry in 2007, and in the Department of Medical Genetics in 2008, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2012.

She holds/has held multiple external salary awards including a CIHR New Investigator Award, a Michael Smith Career Investigator Award, and a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair, and received CIHR’s 2007 Maud Menten New Investigator Award. She is co-author of the book “How to talk with families about genetics and psychiatric illness” (W.W Norton, 2011), Graduate Advisor to the UBC Genetic Counseling program, and a Board Certified Genetic Counselor.

Dr. Martin Dawes

Director & Co-Founder, Personalized Medicine Institute; Head, Family Practice, UBC Faculty of Medicine

It is not just the genetics that is difficult – the translation to everyday practice is really hard.

martin-dawes-320x386There is a journey of using genetic tests to avoid adverse reactions to drugs used commonly in Family Practice. More than half consultations in Family Practice involve complex decisions about medication, adding a genetic test makes things more complex. Dr Dawes and his team had to go back to the drawing board and rediscover how to help patients and professionals identify the safe effective drugs for the individual person.

BIO: Dr. Dawes is the Head of the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (UBC), and Cofounder of the Personalized Medicine Institute. He started his clinical practice as a family physician in Oxford. Following the completion of his PhD in 1992, he helped develop a Master’s program in Evidence Based Health Care, which allows clinicians to engage in research. He has directed the UK Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine in Oxford and was the head of family practice at McGill University before coming to UBC in 2010. His research includes genomics in primary care and lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes.

Dr. Dawes is currently leading a new research project entitled “The Implementation of Pharmacogenomics in Primary Care in British Columbia”. This novel project is valued at over $720,000, and is being funded through Genome BC’s User Partnership Program, Rx&D’s Health Research Foundation and other partners. The project will also link in with TELUS Health, the largest electronic medical record (EMR) vendor in Canada.

Dr. Howard Lim

Medical Oncologist, BC Cancer Agency; Clinical Physician Professor, Medical Oncology Division, UBC Faculty of Medicine

Personalized Care in Oncology – Pitfalls and Successes

The use of whole genome sequencing technology to understand tumor biology can be used in the hopes of finding actionable howard-lim-320x480targets for patients with cancer.  Dr Lim will provide an overview about how the use of this information can lead to success and how we can learn from the failures.

BIO: Lim is a Medical Oncologist at the BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, specializing in Gastrointestinal Cancer. He is the Program Director of the Medical Oncology Training Program and is the Chair of the GI Tumor Group.

Dr Lim is also an active member of the GI Outcomes Unit, and the Personalized Onco-genomics Program – a clinical research initiative that’s embedding genomic sequencing into the diagnostic and treatment planning for patients with incurable cancers.

Prior to going to medical school, he was fortunate to do research at the BC Cancer Agency Research Centre under Dr. Marcel Bally, in the Department of Advanced Therapeutics. One of the great things that he witnessed was how research could be translated over to patient care seamlessly.

Dr. Lim completed his training in Medical Oncology at the BC Cancer Agency and then did additional training in Gastrointestinal Malignancies at the Oregon Health Sciences University, before coming to the BC Cancer Agency in 2008.

Dr. Corey Nislow

Associate Professor, UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Only in the Light of Evolution: Cells, Organisms, and Pharmacology

corey-nislow-320x480At its core, all of biology can be considered a combination of the forces of natural selection, organism fitness and the extraordinary results required to meet these two challenges. For the past two decades Dr. Nislow’s lab has sought to understand how genotype is revealed in phenotype; by using diverse models from yeast to man and every environment imaginable. This talk will describe the lessons we have learned from such models and how we are applying them to patients.

BIO: Dr. Corey Nislow’s laboratory uses cutting edge tools to address this central question: how can we understand the biological commonalities in all of the life sciences; from embryonic development, to the spread of infectious diseases to better ways to treat cancer. Each of these disciplines, and in fact all of biology, can be explained in the context of competition, interaction and evolution. Therefore his lab studies the interface between genes and the environment using parallel genome-wide screens, high throughput cell-based assays and next generation sequencing of microbial and human populations. He and his scientific partner, Dr. Guri Giaever shift between model systems to understand how genes and drugs interact during normal and pathological states. Most recently, his lab is exploring how laboratory experiments can co-opt evolutionary processes to understand drug action.

He enjoys teaching all aspects of biotechnology, genomics and drug discovery for undergraduate and graduate students. Corey completed a BA in developmental biology at New College and a PhD in cell and molecular biology at the University of Colorado. He was also an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow. He led discovery teams at two biotechnology companies (MJ Research and Cytokinetics Inc., in the San Francisco Bay Area) and at Stanford University. Prior to joining UBC, he was associate professor at the University of Toronto and director of the Donnelly Sequencing Centre.

Dr. Chris Overall

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair, Protease Proteomics & Systems Biology; Professor, UBC Faculty of Dentistry

Can Proteomics Fill the Gap between Genomics and Phenotypes? The Human Proteome Project.

How can only 20,061 human genes encode the complexity of humans when similar numbers of similar genes also encode worms chris-overall-320x480and flys? Mapping and sequencing genes is just the start of this answer. Genes encode proteins and it is proteins that are responsible for forming the cells and tissues of humans. Further, proteins orchestrate the complexity of coordinated signaling between cells and organs that keep us healthy. Dr. Overall will discuss the huge diversity of protein forms, now known as “proteoforms”, and how they lead to the incredible complexity of human cells and tissues. It is through understanding proteoforms that disease mechanisms can be deciphered, new drug targets validated, and accurate diagnostic tests devised that will lead to new medical interventions to treat disease early. By reducing disease and its detrimental outcomes, proteomic biomarkers hold enormous promise to revolutionize diagnostics and personalized medicine ensuring sustainable health care costs.

BIO: Proteases are nature’s biological molecular scissors. Being involved in the fate of every protein—from protein synthesis and maturation, to function changing adaptations in response to changing needs of tissues and cells, and finally in protein removal, proteases are essential to maintaining healthy cells and tissues. Yet, with the good comes the bad. Proteases can dramatically worsen disease and cause tissue destruction leading to disability, pain and death in some diseases like cancer. Thus, Dr. Overall has a long-standing fascination in proteases from his undergraduate days to now. Indeed, he is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Protease Proteomics and Systems Biology and holds a seven-year $5.55M CIHR Foundation Grant to investigate proteases.

Dr. Overall completed his undergraduate BDS, Honors Science and Masters degrees at the University of Adelaide, South Australia; his Ph.D. in Biochemistry at the University of Toronto; and was a MRC Centennial Fellow in his post-doctoral work with Dr. Michael Smith, UBC, learning protein engineering. On Sabbaticals in 1997-1998 he was a Visiting Senior Scientist at British Biotech Pharmaceuticals, Oxford, UK; and again in 2004/2008 he was a Visiting Senior Scientist at the Expert Protease Platform, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland; and in 2010-2012 was an External Senior Fellow and is now an Honorary Professor, at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, Germany.

With over 15,500 citations for his 237 papers he has an h index of 67 and this has been recognized by numerous awards including the 2002 CIHR Scientist of the Year, the UBC Killam Senior Researcher Award (Science) 2005, and several life time achievement awards. He was the Chair of the 2003 Matrix Metalloproteinase Gordon Research Conference and the 2010 Protease Gordon Research Conference. More recently his interests are evolving to deciphering immune deficiencies and chronic inflammatory diseases by the use of proteomics and degradomics, a term he coined. He was elected as Co-Chair of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) Chromosome–Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) in 2014 and was recently elected in 2016 to the Executive Committee of HUPO.


Click here to register for this event online. Click here for the event details. Questions? Please contact Sarah Irwin, Alumni Engagement Manager, UBC Medicine at sarah.irwin@ubc.ca or 604-875-4111 x67741.

medtalk sponsors

 

A joint federal-provincial and university investment was announced on December 5, 2016 at UBC’s Okanagan campus to establish a new Teaching and Learning Centre and fund various sustainability and infrastructure upgrades.

International Students’ Day is celebrated annually on November 17. It is a day of both commemoration and celebration: a chance to recognize the 1939 Nazi German storming of Czech universities and the resulting arrests and deaths of hundreds of students; and a chance to celebrate and support the continued activism of student communities around the world today.

Here at the Digitization Centre, we’ve decided to feature some of our collection items which highlight student activism at UBC over the course of the last several decades. Student protests, sit-ins and other forms of activism give voice to the needs and rights of UBC’s student body, and have, at times,  led to widespread and progressive institutional change.

Perhaps the earliest student protest at UBC was known as the Great Trek, when nearly 1,200 students marched from downtown Vancouver to the unfinished Point Grey campus to protest government inaction on construction of the new university. To learn more about the Great Trek, check out this article from The Ubyssey.

cdm-arphotos-1-0020439full

Great Trek at Georgia and Granville streets, 1922

In 1968, due to overcrowding on-campus and a perceived lack of long-term vision for higher education in the province, over 1,000 students staged a massive sit-in to “liberate” UBC’s Faculty Club. The atmosphere of resistance and unrest coincided with a visit by American activist Jerry Rubin, and was no doubt informed by the radical activism taking place on university campuses across the border in the United States. As a result of the sit-in, a campus-wide day of reflection took place in order to address student concerns, and student involvement in the University’s governing bodies increased. For more information on this interesting period in the University’s history, click here and here.

cdm-arphotos-1-0136072full

Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968

cdm-arphotos-1-0150991full

Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968

cdm-arphotos-1-0150989full

Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968

cdm-ubysseynews-1-0127950-0000full

The Ubyssey, October 25, 1968

cdm-ubysseynews-1-0127950-0002full

The Ubyssey, October 25, 1968

Other forms of action and activism have taken place at UBC campus in the intervening years, and we will undoubtedly see more such events in the future.

cdm-arphotos-1-0153313full

School of Architecture paint-in, 1974

cdm-arphotos-1-0159845full

Student Robin Wiley speaking at tuition fee increase protest, 1995

cdm-arphotos-1-0137069full

Point Grey beach erosion protestors prevent start of erosion control project, 1974

cdm-arphotos-1-0137057full

Students sitting on floor of Administration building, ca. 1970

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet