Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC closed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


The topic of ‘human-robot interaction’ will still be a hot one in 100 years. The tools may change but the problems, such as “How do people and robots get along?” will remain the same. Questions surrounding what robots should do; and how we can share, operate safely, communicate, take turns, teach robots, and generally get along together will continue to be problems requiring solutions. The efforts we make to establish the ‘rules of engagement’ now will certainly be foundational to our future relationships.

Elizabeth Croft was featured in the video “A Robot in Every Home” in the February 2015 online issue of Trek Magazine.

@ecroft

Moderated by Marc Parlange – Dean and Professor, UBC’s Faculty of Applied Science


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Bartneck, C., Kulić, D., Croft, E., & Zoghbi, S. (2009). Measurement instruments for the anthropomorphism, animacy, likeability, perceived intelligence, and perceived safety of robots. International Journal of Social Robotics, 1(1), 71-81. doi:10.1007/s12369-008-0001-3 [Link]

Kulić, D., & Croft, E. (2007). Pre-collision safety strategies for human-robot interaction. Autonomous Robots, 22(2), 149-164. doi:10.1007/s10514-006-9009-4 [Link]

Luu, B. L., Inglis, J. T., Huryn, T. P., Van der Loos, H. F. Machiel, Croft, E. A., & Blouin, J. (2012). Human Standing is Modified by an Unconscious Integration of Congruent Sensory and Motor Signals: Vestibular-Motor Pathways in Standing. The Journal of Physiology, 590(22), 5783-5794. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2012.230334 [Link]

Sheikholeslami, S., Moon, A., & Croft, E. A. (2015). Exploring the Effect of Robot Hand Configurations in Directional Gestures for Human-Robot Interaction. Paper presented at the 3594-3599. doi:10.1109/IROS.2015.7353879 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Mechanical Engineering


Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC closed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


What will we eat when we need to feed 11 billion people globally by 2100?* With rapid population increase and climate change coupled with the focus on cash crops and loss of food diversity, is a fundamental shift in our diets and the way our food is supplied essential for us to be able to feed ourselves equitably worldwide? Hear from chef, restauranteur and climate change activist, Meeru Dhalwala, on her insights on these and other aspects of our future food sources.

*Sources: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/sep/18/world-population-new-study-11bn-2100

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/346/6206/234

@MeeruDhalwala

Moderated by Rickey Yada, BSc’77, MSc’80, PhD’84 – Dean and Professor, UBC’s Faculty of Land and Food Systems


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Dyson, Tim. Population and Food: Global Trends and Future Prospects. London: Routledge, 1996. Print. [Available at Koerner Library – HD9000.5 .D97 1996]

Murphy, Elaine M. Food and Population: A Global Concern. Washington, D.C. : Population Reference Bureau, Inc., 1984. Print. [Available at Koerner Library – HD9000.5 .M87 1984]

on Agriculture, S., & Forestry. (2014). Innovation in agriculture: The key to feeding a growing population Canada. Senate Committee Reports. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Dietetics and Nutrition

Food Science

Health Statistics & Data

Population and Public Health


Great things happen when our brightest minds have the freedom to explore. When we pursue our unique interests, the resulting collective capacity for innovation is limitless. The issues of the future will require these creative solutions as the need to build connections between people, nations and disciplines has never been greater.

On May 28th, UBC wclosed out the Centennial year with some great minds providing perspectives on topics of the future.


We are living a turning point in history, the moment when we are re-envisioning industrial society. We now know that the cumulative impacts of our fossil fuel economy threaten the air we breathe, the water we drink and even a stable economy and climate. The good news is that major advances in technology and the dramatic drop in the price of renewable energy make the scale of change necessary within our grasp.

@Tzeporah

Moderated by Kathryn Harrison, PhD’93 – Senior Associate Dean, UBC’s Faculty of Arts; Professor of Political Science


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Berman Tzeporah, Christopher Hatch; Maurice Gibbons; Ronald B. Hatch; Gordon Brent Ingram; Loys Maingon (1994). Clayoquot & Dissent. Ronsdale Press. [Link]

Berman, T., & Leiren-Young, M. (2011). This crazy time: Living our environmental challenge. Toronto: Knopf Canada. [Available at Okanagan Library – GE195.9 .B47 2011]


UBC Library Research Guides

Natural Resources Conservation

Sustainability

May 3–31 It’s About Time: A Retrospective of Asian Presence at UBC
Located on the Main Floor (level 2) of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

To commemorate UBC’s Centennial, the Asian Canadian and Asian Migration Studies Program invites you to celebrate 100 years of Asian communities at UBC. The exhibition is a relational project that showcases various stories from the Hong Kong Canada Crosscurrents Project, a trailer and photos from the upcoming film All Our Father’s Relations, creative work done by students for the ACAM Student Journal, and narratives from the ACAM Centennial Alumni Project: Retelling UBC’s History from an Asian Canadian Lens. By engaging with these existing projects, ACAM hopes to foster dialogue that includes alternative histories around the UBC community. We ask how these different yet intertwined Asian diasporic histories influence the ways in which the current student body interacts with the unceded territory upon which we live and work.

May 7, 2016 | 1:00-3:30pm | In 2012, UBC was awarded a $3 million grant to explore the cultural evolutionary origins of religion, and the role that religion has played in human cooperation and conflict, and the rise of large-scale societies. Learn about the project's guiding hypotheses, as well as research findings about moralizing gods, costly sacrifices, group rituals, and moral realism.
When: Jan. 30, 2016 | 9:30am-12:00pm | Lecture is free. Registration required.

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