Above image is courtesy of SPARC

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

 

BCcampus, BCIT, SFU, UBC CTLT and UBC Library celebrate International Open Access Week 2017

A BC collaborative event, in celebration of this global movement now in its 10th year, will be happening at BCIT’s downtown campus location tonight.

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Learn more

 

Explore Open Access Week at UBC

 

______

 

Building a Sustainable Knowledge Commons – COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories)

COAR just released an animated infographic highlighting the five prerequisites for a sustainable knowledge commons

 

About COAR

An international association comprised of 100+ global members and partners (representing libraries, universities, research institutions, government funders and others) aims to build a sustainable, global knowledge commons based on a network of open access digital repositories.

 

Download the PDF

 

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Examples of open access in action

 

What concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available?

 

Check out SPARC’s new site highlighting 16 examples of the concrete benefits of making research open.

 

Learn more

 

About SPARC

A global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education.

 

______

 

Open access: six myths to put to rest

What are the six most common misconceptions about open access?

Test your knowledge courtesy of Peter Suber (Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and author of Open Access (MIT Press, 2012).

 

Myths:

  • The only way to provide open access to peer-reviewed journal articles is to publish in open access journals
  • All or most open access journals charge publication fees
  • Most author-side fees are paid by the authors themselves
  • Publishing in a conventional journal closes the door on making the same work open access
  • Open access journals are intrinsically low in quality
  • Open access mandates infringe academic freedom

 

Uncover the facts here

 

______

 

Open Access at the Natural History Museum, London

In 2017, the Natural History Museum in London signed the International Open Data Accord (joining the growing number of museums) in publishing their collection databases and digital reproductions online. This undertaking is “part of its five-year plan to build a Museum for the future” by combining the expertise and skills from museum scientists, librarians, and archivists to create and digitize electronic records, making them openly accessible to all. So far, there are 3.8 million specimens already digitized and accessible via the Museum’s Data Portal comprised of the Museum’s research and collections data.

 

Learn more

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above image is courtesy of SPARC

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

 

BCcampus, BCIT, SFU, UBC CTLT and UBC Library celebrate International Open Access Week 2017

A BC collaborative event, in celebration of this global movement now in its 10th year, will be happening at BCIT’s downtown campus location tonight.

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Learn more

 

Explore Open Access Week at UBC

 

______

 

Building a Sustainable Knowledge Commons – COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories)

COAR just released an animated infographic highlighting the five prerequisites for a sustainable knowledge commons

 

About COAR

An international association comprised of 100+ global members and partners (representing libraries, universities, research institutions, government funders and others) aims to build a sustainable, global knowledge commons based on a network of open access digital repositories.

 

Download the PDF

 

______

 

Examples of open access in action

 

What concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available?

 

Check out SPARC’s new site highlighting 16 examples of the concrete benefits of making research open.

 

Learn more

 

About SPARC

A global coalition committed to making Open the default for research and education.

 

______

 

Open access: six myths to put to rest

What are the six most common misconceptions about open access?

Test your knowledge courtesy of Peter Suber (Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication and author of Open Access (MIT Press, 2012).

 

Myths:

  • The only way to provide open access to peer-reviewed journal articles is to publish in open access journals
  • All or most open access journals charge publication fees
  • Most author-side fees are paid by the authors themselves
  • Publishing in a conventional journal closes the door on making the same work open access
  • Open access journals are intrinsically low in quality
  • Open access mandates infringe academic freedom

 

Uncover the facts here

 

______

 

Open Access at the Natural History Museum, London

In 2017, the Natural History Museum in London signed the International Open Data Accord (joining the growing number of museums) in publishing their collection databases and digital reproductions online. This undertaking is “part of its five-year plan to build a Museum for the future” by combining the expertise and skills from museum scientists, librarians, and archivists to create and digitize electronic records, making them openly accessible to all. So far, there are 3.8 million specimens already digitized and accessible via the Museum’s Data Portal comprised of the Museum’s research and collections data.

 

Learn more

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

 

Marking its tenth anniversary this October, the International Open Access Week: October 23-29, 2017 is a large scale, global event. It is where open access advocates, supporters and participants share their knowledge and experiences about the benefits of Open Access. This event serves to “inspire wider adoption and participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research”.

 

Starting in 2007 as an Open Access Day event dubbed as “a partnership between SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and students who organized local events on a handful of campuses across the United States”, it is now a worldwide event where anyone interested in furthering the dissemination of openly accessible scholarly research can partake.

 

The collaborative International Open Access Week 2017 event by UBC Library, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) libraries, and BC Campus will take place as follows:

 

DATE:

Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

PRE-EVENT:

5:00-6:00pm (arrivals and appetizers)

 

EVENT SESSION:

6:00-8:00pm (including coffee and dessert)

 

LOCATION:

BCIT’s downtown campus

 

The event theme, Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation: 2017-10-26, will address not only the “benefits and opportunities of open access but also a recognition that openness can sometimes create unintended consequences for individuals and communities”.

 

Register here and join BC’s open scholarship conversation in celebration of International Open Access Week 2017!

 

 

 

 

16x24oaweekposter2016-600x900

 

“International Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.” (SPARC)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Open Access Week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. This global event, now entering its eighth year, will take place from Oct. 24 – 30, 2016.

 

Join us at one of the many Open Access Week events, either face-to-face or online, at participating B.C. post-secondary institutions.

 

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.

 

Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

 

Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.

 

Above image and text excerpt are courtesy of BCcampus

sojourners-logo

For seven years, the journal has showcased exemplary papers written by students with a sociological perspective. Contributing to the journal affords students an invaluable opportunity to have their work published early in their academic careers.

– A Message from the Sojourners’  Co-editors in Chief

 

After a year in the making, it is a pleasure to announce the arrival of Sojourners in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

 

BACKGROUND

In the words of first Editor-in-Chief of Sojourners, Sierra Skye Gemma, this young journal began as “a simple idea”. It was dubbed “the journal” – “a student proposal to provide a venue for the publication of outstanding undergraduate writing in Sociology”.

Not only did this become evident early on (in fact, in 2008), “the Sociology Students Association transformed this idea into a reality by voting to make “the journal” one of the Association’s central projects in that school year”.

First came the planning, followed by the submission, review, editing process. With the major undertaking of a successful fundraising campaign much to the credit of Maureen Mendoza, “you as, the Reader, would not be reading this first issue”, noted Gemma.

Due to the overwhelming student response back then, the journal article submissions were from many UBC departments and included book reviews whereby many “donated their time and talents to the journal”.

While traveling through the unfamiliar world of academic publishing, the Sojourners’ authors wanted to “provide [their] readers with the opportunity to take a sociological sojourn in unknown places, (sub)cultures, and realms of thought”.

So, with a number of articles from Volume 1 to the present day, the Sojourners’ journal highlights both timely and topical subjects involved when studying and researching the world of sociology and its influence whether it be on people, (sub)cultures and perceptions as seen through the eyes UBC’s undergraduate students.

“The articles span the globe, with Connor Cavanagh focusing on famine in Zimbabwe and Michael Kehl deliberating on the effects of the “Three Strikes” law in California. They also address a wide range of topics, from Manori Ravindran’s consideration of postfeminism and the pop music phenomenon of The Spice Girls to Hélène Frohard-Dourlent’s analysis of the impact of socioeconomic status on children’s success in school.”

With such support, Sojourners will surely continue to be published for many years to come.

 

QUICK FACTS

Sojourners (an undergraduate Journal of Sociology) is a peer and Faculty reviewed journal published annually by the Sociology Students Association of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

‘While Sojourners provides a platform for the dissemination of sociological undergraduate work, it is not department-specific and its articles span the globe’.

NOTE: Submissions are accepted in the fall of each year.

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Full-text and openly accessible Volumes 1, 2, 3/4, 5 and 6 &7 of Sojourners (and future volumes) via cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

sojourners-logo

For seven years, the journal has showcased exemplary papers written by students with a sociological perspective. Contributing to the journal affords students an invaluable opportunity to have their work published early in their academic careers.

– A Message from the Sojourners’  Co-editors in Chief

 

After a year in the making, it is a pleasure to announce the arrival of Sojourners in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

 

BACKGROUND

In the words of first Editor-in-Chief of Sojourners, Sierra Skye Gemma, this young journal began as “a simple idea”. It was dubbed “the journal” – “a student proposal to provide a venue for the publication of outstanding undergraduate writing in Sociology”.

Not only did this become evident early on (in fact, in 2008), “the Sociology Students Association transformed this idea into a reality by voting to make “the journal” one of the Association’s central projects in that school year”.

First came the planning, followed by the submission, review, editing process. With the major undertaking of a successful fundraising campaign much to the credit of Maureen Mendoza, “you as, the Reader, would not be reading this first issue”, noted Gemma.

Due to the overwhelming student response back then, the journal article submissions were from many UBC departments and included book reviews whereby many “donated their time and talents to the journal”.

While traveling through the unfamiliar world of academic publishing, the Sojourners’ authors wanted to “provide [their] readers with the opportunity to take a sociological sojourn in unknown places, (sub)cultures, and realms of thought”.

So, with a number of articles from Volume 1 to the present day, the Sojourners’ journal highlights both timely and topical subjects involved when studying and researching the world of sociology and its influence whether it be on people, (sub)cultures and perceptions as seen through the eyes UBC’s undergraduate students.

“The articles span the globe, with Connor Cavanagh focusing on famine in Zimbabwe and Michael Kehl deliberating on the effects of the “Three Strikes” law in California. They also address a wide range of topics, from Manori Ravindran’s consideration of postfeminism and the pop music phenomenon of The Spice Girls to Hélène Frohard-Dourlent’s analysis of the impact of socioeconomic status on children’s success in school.”

With such support, Sojourners will surely continue to be published for many years to come.

 

QUICK FACTS

Sojourners (an undergraduate Journal of Sociology) is a peer and Faculty reviewed journal published annually by the Sociology Students Association of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

‘While Sojourners provides a platform for the dissemination of sociological undergraduate work, it is not department-specific and its articles span the globe’.

NOTE: Submissions are accepted in the fall of each year.

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Full-text and openly accessible Volumes 1, 2, 3/4, 5 and 6 &7 of Sojourners (and future volumes) via cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

read-341027_640_a

Guest post by Elizabeth Simmons, Graduate Academic Assistant, Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office

You’ve probably heard about Amazon’s new service that offers monthly subscribers unlimited access to eBooks on their Kindles.  Well, guess what? There are plenty of free, open access eBooks available online—you just have to know where to look!

Project Gutenberg is an amazing resource, with more than 45,000 free e-books available to everyone, anywhere, including many that you can download. Browse their list of Partners, Affiliates, and Resources for even more free e-books. Other resources include the Internet Archive and Open Library and Google Books.

UBC has eBooks too! Find them in the Library’s catalogue at: http://resources.library.ubc.ca/. Click on “More Options” and you’ll be given the chance to limit search results to eBooks that are “Open Access for Everyone.” When limiting your search to eBooks available only to UBC faculty, staff, and students, you’ll gain access to a plethora of other eBooks.

Members of the UBC community are actively supporting open scholarship initiatives in the library and beyond, with the goal of “encouraging unrestricted access to research and scholarly publishing.” Learn more about them at UBC:  http://open.ubc.ca/access/.  And, don’t miss Open UBC Week 2014 on October 28th & 29th, featuring open lectures, information sessions, workshops, and more!

Did You Know?

“The University creates and advances knowledge and understanding, and improves the quality of life through the discovery, dissemination, and application of research within and across disciplines”. – From UBC’s Research Excellence – Strategic Priorities

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

 

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