Like many of you, we are spending a lot more time on virtual meetings here at the Digitization Centre. For this post, we’ve compiled a bunch of backgrounds from Open Collections that will refresh your space and make your next video call, online lecture, or virtual party more fun.

From the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, we found images that bring the spectacular BC scenery to your home office.

The Lions, [1919]

Suspension Bridge, Capilano Canyon,1917

Sunset, English Bay, Vancouver, B.C., 1927

If you are looking for something artistic, make sure to check out prints from the Chung Collection and Meiji at 150.

Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s Steamship Fleets, [1910]

Mount Eisenhower, [not before 1940]

Tōkyō nishikie seizō no zu, 東京錦繪製造之図, [1877]

The following images can probably beat most million-dollar-view offices in downtown.

The U.B.C. and Vancouver, [between 1940 and 1950?]

Aerial view showing Brockton Point & city, Vancouver, B.C., [not before 1937]

[View of downtown Vancouver B. C.], 1957

Is your room messy? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Check out the following images of interiors from hotels and a Canadian Pacific steamship.

Interior of Grouse Mountain Chalet, [between 1920 and 1930?]

Palm Garden, The Empress, Victoria, B.C., [between 1908 and 1910?]

Cabin dining saloon, [Canadian Pacific S.S. Melita], [1918?]

And finally, you can host your meeting here from UBC.

Main Library concourse, 1929

Cows grazing in front of Library, May 31, 1937

This is a composite photograph created from two separate images.

View of Main Library from Koerner Library, 2002

The third Monday of February is Family Day in British Columbia. We hope you enjoyed quality time with your loved ones. In celebration of Family Day, we are sharing some of our favourite family albums from the Open Collections.

The MacLachlan Clan – By Bob, [1865-1945?]

This is a family album put together by Bob MacLachlan. The family moved from Edinburgh, Scotland to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and then finally to Vancouver, BC. The photos encompass all of these locations. It is predominantly photos of the family, but there are also drawings, cards, news clippings, as well as other ephemera pasted in.

The Maclachlan Clan, [between 1935 and 1945?]

This is the cover page for the album. Small clippings of portrait photos of the family members are attached onto the hand-drawn monkeys.

[Family photo], [between 1920 and 1940?]

[Tom Maclachlan with baby], [between 1935 and 1945?]

 

[Possible Murray Family Photo Album #2], [1890?]-1959

This is an album of family portraits, possibly from the Murray family of Vancouver. There are also some photos tucked in the back from a much later date. There are also 8 negatives in an envelope addressed to “Mr. Unger.”

[Family portrait], [between 1920 and 1930?]

[Group portrait], [between 1920 and 1930?]


[Robert Sinclair’s Photo Album], [1900-1923?]

The album is from a man named Robert Sinclair. The photos are predominantly of family snapshots, and images from around their rural home in BC. There are also some of farming and logging, and a few of different cities and locales throughout BC. Some of the photos are captioned, but none are dated. The album is secured with a metal clasp and is in quite good condition, as are the photos.

[Older man playing with baby], [between 1910 and 1920?]

[Family picnicking], [between 1910 and 1920?]

Adam and Eve, also Flossy, [between 1910 and 1920?]

 

[Unknown Family Photo Album], [1900-1925?]

This family photo album, possibly from a Vancouver family, has an emphasis on children and dogs. Many photos have others tucked in behind them. The photos and the album are still in fairly good shape.

[Small child with dog], [between 1900 and 1910?]

[Man and infant playing with puppies], [between 1915 and 1925?]

[Two children sitting in grass], [between 1900 and 1910?]

 

[Possible Murray Family Photo Album], [1920-1930?]

This is an album of predominantly landscape photographs from throughout BC, as well as a few in Vancouver, including some of ships in the harbour. In the back after a number of blank pages are also some family snapshots. Many of the photos are captioned in fading pencil. The album may have belonged to a member of Kathleen Murray’s family.

[Portrait of group of women and children], [between 1920 and 1930?]

[Couple on zip line swing], [between 1920 and 1930?]

 

[Vancouver Family Photo Album], [1925-1950?]

This album is from a Vancouver family, documenting their travels throughout BC and the United States as well as life in Vancouver, including the royal visit of 1939. The pages are beginning to tear out of the album, but the photos are still in relatively good shape (with some fading).

[Woman helping a baby walk], 1933

[Portrait of two small children], 1933

 

We hope you enjoyed this post! To view more family photographs from the 1850s to the 1950s, please check out the Chung Collection and the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs.

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, we have historic photographs depicting street scenes in Vancouver in the early 1900s. In this post, we will introduce some of our favourite photographs, showing the heritage buildings in Downtown Vancouver. We hope you can identify these buildings and how they have changed since then!

Carnegie Library

Carnegie Library, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1910 and 1920?]

The building is located on the corner of Main Street and Hastings Streets and is now the Vancouver Public Library, Carnegie Branch.

Holy Rosary Cathedral

The Church of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1910 and 1920?]

Church of Our Lady of the Holy Rosary, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1901 and 1910?]

The Holy Rosary Cathedral is located at the intersection of Richards and Dunsmuir streets. It opened on December 8, 1900. It is listed on the Vancouver Heritage Register and is a legally protected building (source: Wikipedia). Here is a photo of the altar in the Holy Rosary Cathedral.

Sanctuary of R.C. Cathedral, Vancouver, B.C., [1906]

Hotel Europe

Hotel Europe, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1905 and 1915?]

The caption on the postcard reads, “The only ABSOLUTELY fireproof hotel in the Dominion – when in Vancouver, visit us”.

The building was constructed in 1908-1909. Situated on a triangular area formed by Powell Street and Alexander Street, beside the Maple Tree Square in Gastown, it is designed in the “flatiron” style. The name “flatiron” derives from the building’s resemblance to a cloth iron. (Source: Wikipedia).

Dominion Trust Building

Another flatiron-style heritage building is the Dominion Trust Building at the corner of West Hastings and Cambie Streets, across the street from Victory Square. There are a few postcards in the Uno Langmann collection depicting the building in different times.

A Busy Corner in Vancouver, B.C., [not after 1909]

Dominion Trust Block, [not after 1910]

Dominion Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C., [1910]

The Dominion Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1920 and 1930?]

Vancouver Block

The Vancouver Block sits near the intersection of Granville and Georgia Streets. Constructed between 1910 and 1912, it was one of the grandest skyscrapers at that time (source: Canada’s Historic Places).

The Vancouver Block, one of the newest skyscrapers

Here is a double postcard with the second connected card depicting a typical floor plan for the building.

Vancouver Block, [between 1912 and 1915?]

The building features a large clock tower on the top. Let’s have a close look at how big the clock is!

Clock on the observation deck of the Vancouver Block building, [1921]

Post Office Building and Winch Building

New Post Office, Vancouver, B.C., [1910]

Post office, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1920 and 1935?]

Winch Building, Vancouver, B.C., [not before 1911]

Completed in 1910, the old Post Office Building is located at the corner of Granville and Hastings Streets. Vancouver’s main post office was housed here from 1910 to 1958. Adjoining the old Post Office Building is the Winch Building, completed in 1911. The two buildings are now part of the Sinclair Centre. (Source: Wikipedia).

We hope you enjoyed this post! In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs we also have photographs from other cities and towns in BC, such as Victoria, New Westminster, Penticton, and Fernie. To view more historic photographs, please visit Open Collections.

 

In this two-part series, we compile images of winter activities and attractions from Open Collections. You can view Part I here.

Winter destinations

Banff National Park is a signature travel destination both in summer and winter. This menu from the Canadian Pacific Railway in the Chung Collection advertises winter sports in Banff on the cover.

Winter sports at Banff, Jun 29, 1928

Be sure to check out Lake Louise. This scenic lake is especially nice in the snow.

[Lake Louise], [between 1925 and 1935?]

Lake Louise, [between 1910 and 1919?]

Home of the Quebec Winter Carnival, Quebec City is known for its European feel. This pamphlet from the Chung Collection profiles the picturesque city in summer and winter.

Quebec: summer and winter, 1924

Quebec: summer and winter, 1897, p. 19

This Canadian Pacific Railway Company pamphlet promotes winter sports in Quebec City:

Chateau Frontenac: the wintersport capital of wintersport land, 1924

Located to the north-east of Quebec City, Montmorency Falls are also a must-see.

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p. 144

These two illustrations depict Niagara Falls in winter:

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 8

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 349

Montreal also had winter carnivals in the 1880s (Source: Wikipedia). These carnivals featured Ice Palaces, which were described in an illustrated book:

In the evening of the inauguration of the Ice Palace, everybody came to Dominion Square, where there was every sort of light but sunlight. The Ice Palace looked like glass; and I never saw anything so beautiful as when they burned blue, green, crimson and purple fires inside.

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p.253

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 246

Canada: a memorial volume. General reference book on Canada; describing the dominion at large, and its various provinces and territories; with statistics relating to its commerce and the development of its resources. Maps and illustrations, 1889, p. 222

We hope you have a warm and wonderful holiday season!

The holiday season is fast approaching! Are you looking for vacation ideas? In this two-part series, we compile images of winter activities and attractions from Open Collections. Enjoy!

Winter sports

Canada is a playground for winter sports lovers. Snowshoeing, sledding, and tobogganing as recreational activities can date back to 19th century. Check out these engravings in Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil from the Chung collection:

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p.47

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p.48

Here are more illustrations of winter sports from the book Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive. Being an account of the extent, resources, physical aspect, industries, cities and chief towns of the provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, the North-west Territory, and British Columbia. With sketches of travel and adventure. Illustrated with three hundred and sixty engravings in the BC Historical Books Collection. The book was published in 1889.

Do not try it at home!

These postcards from the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs show winter leisure in Vancouver.

Skating on Trout Lake, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1915 and 1925?]

Winter sports, Grouse Mountain Park, North Vancouver, B.C., [between 1922 and 1941?]

This book from the BC Historical Books Collection has detailed information on the development of curling in British Columbia.

Manual 1907-8 of the British Columbia (formerly Kootenay) Curling Association in affiliation with the Royal Caledonian Curling Club, 1908

Finally, if none of the above strikes your fancy, there are also some unconventional games. This cartoon from Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection depicts fictional winter sports that “suit all tastes”.

New games for Christmas, 1911

Did you know that mountains cover 75 per cent of British Columbia[i]? Like the beaches we introduced in April, mountains offer beautiful scenery in summer. Today, we will focus on the Canadian Rockies depicted and described in our digitized photographs, illustrations, and books in Open Collections.

 

Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, you can find postcards of the Rockies:

Mt. Robson

This is a postcard of Mt. Robson, the highest peak (3,954 m; 12,972 ft) in British Columbia and of all the Canadian Rockies mountains:

Frank, Leonard. Mt. Robson, highest peak, Canadian Rockies, 1927

 

Mt. Field

Another postcard depicts Mt. Field (2,643 m; 8,671 ft), located within the Yoho National Park.

Mt. Field, Rockies, 1920

 

Mt. Stephen

The Langmann Collection has a photograph album titled, “20 real photographs of Canadian Rocky Mountains”. This is the photo of Field, BC and Mt. Stephen (3,199 m; 10,496 ft), which is also located within Yoho National Park. Mt. Stephen is the tallest of the mountains surrounding the town:

Field and Mount Stephen, [between 1920 and 1925?].

Chung Collection

Castle Mountain (Miistsukskoowa)

The Chung Collection also has numerous photographs of the Canadian Rockies mountains. Castle Mountain (Miistsukskoowa), a traditional territory of Siksika First Nation[ii], is located within Banff National park. It has numerous rock-climbing routes:

R. H. Trueman & Company. [Castle Mountain, Banff, Alberta], [between 1890 and 1899?].

The Three Sisters mountains

William Notman & Sons photography. [Three Sisters mountain range at Canmore, Alberta], 1899.

Mt. Assiniboine

Mt. Assiniboine (3,618 m; 11,870 ft) is located on the British Columbia/Alberta border.

Mt. Assiniboine, [between 1930 and 1939?].

Canadian Pacific Railway’s Advertisements

In the Chung Collection, we have digitized many advertising pamphlets of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s hotels and train tours which have beautiful illustrations on their front pages.

This 100-page booklet includes the detailed descriptions of each sightseeing spot in the Canadian Rockies:

The challenge of the mountains, 1904.

This five-page pamphlet also summarizes the resorts in the Rockies:

Through the Canadian Rockies, 1931.

 

BC Historical Books collection

BC Historical Books collection has books from the late 19th century and the early 19th century about the Canadian Rockies:

Outram, James, Sir. In the heart of the Canadian Rockies, 1905.

Coleman, A. P. The Canadian Rockies : new and old trails. With 3 maps and 41 illustrations, 1911.

 

We hope you have a chance to enjoy the mountain views this summer. If you want to explore more mountains in Open Collections, here are some items and keywords you can access:


[i] Geography of B.C. (Welcome BC)

[ii] Siksika Nation, federal government to honour Blackhoot traditions with Castle Mountain Settlement (Jan 25, 2017 in CBC News)

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, we have historic photographs depicting street scenery in Vancouver in the early 1900s. This post will explore some of our favourite photographs, showing the major streets in Vancouver. We hope you can identify where the pictures were taken and how the streets have changed since then!

Granville street

Granville St., Vancouver, B.C. [between 1904 and 1907?]

Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C. [between 1920 and 1930?].

Granville St., Vancouver. [between 1924 and 1949?]

 

Hastings Street

Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C., [not after 1910]

Barrowclough, George Alfred. Hasting St., Vancouver, B.C., [between 1910 and 1920?]

Hastings Street Looking East, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1940 and 1960?]

 

Georgia Street

Georgia Street, Vancouver, [between 1914 and 1939].

United Fishers and Allied Workers May Day parade on Georgia Street, Vancouver, 1947.

Georgia St. W., Vancouver, B.C., [between 1924 and 1949?].

Robson Street

Barrowclough, George Alfred. Manhattan Apartments, Robson St., Vancouver, B.C., 1907.

Davie Street

[View of a trolley car on Davie Street, Vancouver], [between 1900 and 1910?].

Burrard Street

Aero Surveys Photo. Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1940 and 1950?]

Cambie Street

B.C. Photo Card Co. Cambie St, Vancouver, 1915.

 

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, we also have photographs and postcards of streets from other cities (e.g., New Westminster, Fernie, and Chilliwack). The following is useful subject headings to search:

 

We hope you enjoyed this post. To view more historic photographs, please visit our Open Collections.

 

[July 29th update: We removed one photo which was not from Downtown Vancouver.]

Now that the rainy season is finally ending, we’re ready to enjoy British Columbia’s beautiful beaches. For this post, we gathered together historic photos of B.C. beaches, from right here in the Lower Mainland to Powell River.

Starting locally, we found several photos of beaches at and near UBC in the UBC Archives Photograph collection. This photo of Wreck Beach from the 1980s shows the erosion of the Point Grey cliffs:

UBC 1.1/16555-8. Point Grey cliff erosion, aerial view, showing WWII searchlight tower and close-up of cliff-face, July 1983.

 

This photo of Jericho Beach from 1962 also shows the surrounding area, including West Point Grey and Kitsilano:

Holborne, Peter. UBC 1.1/3303. Aerial view of Jericho beach area, September 6, 1962.

 

Although the exact location of this photo within Vancouver is unknown, we love this beach attire from around 1900:

[Woman on a beach], [1900?].

 

These postcards show Kitsilano Beach in the early 20th century – check out the men’s suits in the first photo!

The Beach, Kitsilano, [between 1905 and 1915?].

Kitsilano Beach, Vancouver, Canada, [between 1910 and 1935?].

Kitsilano Beach and Swimming Pool, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, [between 1920 and 1930?].

 

We found several photos of English Bay and Second Beach, over by Stanley Park:

Timms, Philip T. A warm day at the beach, Vancouver B.C., [1906].

English Bay, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1930 and 1939?].

Bullen, Harry Elder. Stanley Park, Second Beach, [between 1910 and 1920?].

Second Beach, Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1920 and 1927?].

 

This photo shows several 1920s businesses near Crescent Beach in Surrey, including an ice cream parlor and a shop selling fish and chips:

Crescent Beach, B.C., [between 1920 and 1930?].

 

This postcard shows a bustling day at Boundary Bay, close to the Canada/U.S. border:

Boundary Bay, [between 1905 and 1915?].

 

In this postcard, swimmers and boaters enjoy the beach at Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver:

Whytecliff, B.C., [between 1920 and 1935?].

 

In Powell River, Willingdon Beach is a serene location for enjoying the beach and camping:

Powell River Studios. Willingdon Beach, 1947.

 

We hope you get the chance this season to visit the nearby beaches and other vacation spots around the province to enjoy what B.C. has to offer.

Now that spring is well underway, we’re thinking about ways to enjoy the beautiful sunshine! For this post, we’ve gathered together our favourite images of bicycles from Open Collections.

Recently added to the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, this photograph album documents Clara Wilson’s cycling trips across Canada. Check out the full album for many more photos of her adventures!

Sproat Lake, 1940. From Clara Wilson’s photo album, [Ten Annual Cycling Trips, 1938-1947].

1st Bike Riding Lesson, July 1943. From Clara Wilson’s photo album, [Ten Annual Cycling Trips, 1938-1947].

 

As well as providing transportation, cycling can be a great social activity. Here’s a photograph of a women’s cycling club from 1907:

Cycling club and croquet lawn, 1907.

 

We enjoyed looking at this bicycle route map of Victoria, B.C., from 1897:

The Province pocket road map of Victoria and surroundings: compiled for the use of bicyclists from the government map, 1897.

 

Of course, with bikes, you don’t have to stay on the road. These postcards from the Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection depict cyclists on the beach and in the woods:

La plage à marée basse, 1919.

Le bois, 1906.

 

We found photos featuring tricycles, unicycles, and even a 15-wheel bicycle in Open Collections:

UBC 44.1/510. Dee, Martin. Participants in Science Week tricycle race, 1990.

Kong, Vincent. [Photograph of Stanley Kong].

UBC 44.1/2454. UBC engineering students on 15-seat bicycle built for Manulife Ride for Heart to raise funds for research, May 1991.

 

Finally, we loved finding these photos of bicyclists on and around campus – from the UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

UBC 41.1/1446-2. Lindner, Franz. Bicyclists on University Boulevard, 1978.

UBC 44.1/1886. Woman on bicycle, 2005.

Many images in Open Collections show places that, while once centers of railway or mining activity, are no longer as populous as they once were. This post explores historic towns in British Columbia. Some resources describe these as “ghost towns” – towns that were abandoned, have a very small population today, and/or primarily exist as tourist attractions.


Field, BC

Located within Yoho National Park, the town of Field was founded in the 1880s, with construction workers for the Canadian Pacific Railway as its first inhabitants. The town was named after Cyrus West Field, an American businessman. Soon after the railway was completed in 1885, Field became a popular tourist destination for hiking.

Cochrane, Fredrick E. C.P.R. railroad locomotive, The Dominion at Field, BC, September 1954.

The CPR selected Field as the site of Mount Stephen House, their first hotel in British Columbia:

[Field, BC and Mount Stephen], [1888?].

Today, Field has fewer than 200 inhabitants; according to the Field website, they are “people from all corners of Canada, many of whom arrived in the area with skis in tow and couldn’t bring themselves to leave.”


Craigellachie, BC

Craigellachie is best known as the location of the “last spike” of the CPR. The name has a fascinating origin story. According to the BC Geographical Names database:

Craigellachie is the name of a high rock in the valley of the Spey, in Morayshire, Scotland. In the days of the clansmen, a sentinel kept watch here against all enemies; the lighting of a beaconfire summoned the Clan Grant to battle. The battle cry of the Grants’ was “Stand fast, Craigellachie”. Elsewhere, Craigellachie, from the Gaelic creag-eagalach, can be translated as “rock of dread/terror/alarm.”

The story goes that George Stephen, the CPR’s first president, sent a telegraph message quoting “Stand fast, Craigellachie” when he successfully secured additional funding for the railway in 1884.

One year later, on November 7, 1885, the last spike of the CPR was driven into the ground by Donald Smith. This completed the CPR from the east coast to the west coast of Canada:

[Donald Smith drives the last spike on the Canadian Pacific Railway], Nov 7, 1885

Today, this marker is located at the site of the last spike in Craigellachie:

[Last Spike marker at Craigellachie, BC], 1985


North Bend, BC 

Located just across the Fraser River from Boston Bar, North Bend was founded in the early 1880s as a CPR town. In addition to being a stop on the railway, North Bend was known as the location of Fraser Canyon House, another early CPR hotel.

Fraser River near North Bend, BC, [not after 1909].

North Bend, [between 1930 and 1950?]. From Clara Wilson’s photo album, [Ten Annual Cycling Trips, 1938-1947].

[North Bend Roundhouse C.P.R. railroad roundhouse], [1955?].

Today, there are still fewer than 100 residents of North Bend. According to the Boston Bar-North Bend website, “Affordable housing prices and close proximity to stunning nature have resulted in an influx of retirees and summer residents” in recent years.


Bennett, BC

In the late 1890s, Bennett was founded during the Klondike Gold Rush. Bennett is located along the Chilkoot Trail, close to the Alaska and Yukon borders. During the town’s boom years, Fred Trump and Ernest Levin opened the Arctic Restaurant and Hotel, which became a popular destination for prospectors.

Scene at Bennett, En Route to Klondyke Gold Fields, 1898, From the photo album, [En Route to the Klondike 1898-1901].

Craig, M.H. Scene from Lake Bennett during rush of 1898, En Route to Klondyke Gold Fields, 1898. From the photo album, [En Route to the Klondike 1898-1901].

Currently, there are no roads leading to Bennett. If you want to visit, you must arrive by train, taking a boat from Carcross, a charter floatplane, or hiking the Chilkoot Trail. However, there has been recent interest in renewing the town as a tourist destination; the Carcross Tagish First Nation and Parks Canada are collaborating to offer “high end camping trips” in Bennett during summers.


Britannia Beach, BC 

Several years after copper ore was discovered in Britannia Beach in 1888, the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company began mining operations there. Located just south of Squamish, the Britannia Mines were one of the largest mining operations in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s.

Timms, Philip T. Britannia Beach, B.C., Sec.1, [1907].

Timms, Philip T. Britannia Mines, B.C., [1908].

In 1923, the iconic concentrator shown below was built. After the mines closed in 1974, the Britannia Mines Concentrator was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1987, due to its technological innovations.

Britannia Beach, October 1936.

Today, you can visit the Britannia Mine Museum at Britannia Beach, and learn more about the mine on the museum website.


Barkerville, BC

Barkerville is British Columbia’s best-known Cariboo Gold Rush town. Named after William ‘Billy’ Barker, who struck gold there in 1862, the town’s population was as large as 5,800 at its peak.

Tait, Preston L. Barkerville, B.C., [between 1920 and 1930?].

Barkerville B.C., [not after 1950].

[View of storefronts in Barkerville]

Barkerville was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1924 for two reasons: its role as “centre of the Cariboo gold fields which were the catalyst for the economic and political development in British Colombia”, and as “the terminus of the great wagon road from Yale, completed in 1865.”

Today, Barkerville is home to a living-history museum; you can learn more about the town on their website.


References

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet