February 12 is Family Day in British Columbia. While this statutory holiday was created in BC in 2013, falling on the second Monday every February, it has existed in other parts of Canada for even longer.

The very first province to observe Family Day as a statutory holiday was Alberta in 1990, when Family Day was created to give people the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones.

To celebrate the date, we’ve brought you some of our favorite family pictures from our collections.

 

When it comes to building families, often everything starts with a wedding.

[Chinese family wedding], 1940

 

Then, comes the kids

[Two boys dressed as sailors], 1940

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain, 1925-35?

 

Sometimes, several kids

[French family with ten children], 1920-29?

 

But there’s always space for one more

[Photograph depicting a family], 1879

 

Happy Family Day!

Shigetaka Sasaki family

 

F. K. Hare and family, 1968

 

The history behind the photos

Two boys dressed as sailors: the photo is part of an album from a Vancouver family. The album contains several registries from family’s travels across British Columbia and the United States, while also showcasing their life in Vancouver.

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain: the photo is part of an unknown family album from our Uno Langmann Collection. There are photos from British Columbia or Alberta and other locations not identified.

French family with ten children: the photo depicts a French family traveling on the Duchess of Bedford cruise of the Canadian Pacific Railways.

Shigetaka Sasaki family: Steve Shigetaka Sasaki was the top judoka in his province in Japan before he immigrated to Canada in 1922. He was the founder of the Vancouver Judo Club (Taiku Iku Dojo) and was known as the “Father of Judo in Canada”.

F. K. Hare and family: Frederick Kenneth Hare was a meteorologist and environmentalist. Hare was also the fifth president of the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

If you are interested in getting to know more about our collections, the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs have a lot of family photos from 1850s to the 1950s. You will be amazed to see those pictures, as we were.

 

Sources:

British Columbians reflect on the meaning of Family Day (CBC News)

F. Kenneth Hare (Science)

Family Day in Canada (Time and Date)

Former UBC president Kenneth Hare remembered (UBC)

History of Judo in Canada (Vernon Judo Club)

Shigetaka (Steve) Sasaki Family Fonds (Nikkei Museum)

February 12 is Family Day in British Columbia. While this statutory holiday was created in BC in 2013, falling on the second Monday every February, it has existed in other parts of Canada for even longer.

The very first province to observe Family Day as a statutory holiday was Alberta in 1990, when Family Day was created to give people the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones.

To celebrate the date, we’ve brought you some of our favorite family pictures from our collections.

 

When it comes to building families, often everything starts with a wedding.

[Chinese family wedding], 1940

 

Then, comes the kids

[Two boys dressed as sailors], 1940

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain, 1925-35?

 

Sometimes, several kids

[French family with ten children], 1920-29?

 

But there’s always space for one more

[Photograph depicting a family], 1879

 

Happy Family Day!

Shigetaka Sasaki family

 

F. K. Hare and family, 1968

 

The history behind the photos

Two boys dressed as sailors: the photo is part of an album from a Vancouver family. The album contains several registries from family’s travels across British Columbia and the United States, while also showcasing their life in Vancouver.

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain: the photo is part of an unknown family album from our Uno Langmann Collection. There are photos from British Columbia or Alberta and other locations not identified.

French family with ten children: the photo depicts a French family traveling on the Duchess of Bedford cruise of the Canadian Pacific Railways.

Shigetaka Sasaki family: Steve Shigetaka Sasaki was the top judoka in his province in Japan before he immigrated to Canada in 1922. He was the founder of the Vancouver Judo Club (Taiku Iku Dojo) and was known as the “Father of Judo in Canada”.

F. K. Hare and family: Frederick Kenneth Hare was a meteorologist and environmentalist. Hare was also the fifth president of the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

If you are interested in getting to know more about our collections, the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs have a lot of family photos from 1850s to the 1950s. You will be amazed to see those pictures, as we were.

 

Sources:

British Columbians reflect on the meaning of Family Day (CBC News)

F. Kenneth Hare (Science)

Family Day in Canada (Time and Date)

Former UBC president Kenneth Hare remembered (UBC)

History of Judo in Canada (Vernon Judo Club)

Shigetaka (Steve) Sasaki Family Fonds (Nikkei Museum)

The 2018 Winter Olympics are starting this week! They are going to be hosted by PyeongChang in South Korea, beginning on February 9, 2018. For 16 days, we will see the best winter sports athletes in the world compete for gold.

To get into the sportive spirit, we selected a few materials from our collection that show off some of the Olympic winter sports.

 

Freestyle skiing 

An advertisement from our Chung Collection: 

Banff-Lake Louise region Canadian Rockies via Canadian Pacific, 1941

 

Ice hockey 

A photograph from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Hockey players, Ritz brothers, 1939

 

Bobsleigh

A selection from a family album in our Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

[Group on sled], 1928

Curling

An action shot from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Pharmacy dean Bernard Riedel curling, 1979

 

Skating

A photograph from our Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

Skating on Trout Lake, Vancouver, B.C., 1925

 

While researching images for this post, we found plenty of other materials involving outdoor activities in winter. While these activities may not be Olympic sports, they are certainly a workout.

 

Snowshoeing, from our H. Bullock-Webster Fonds:

December – soft snow – misery, 1880

 

Snow shoveling, from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Youth Training School snow shoveling, 1951

 

Grab your mittens and get ready to cheer on your favorite athletes, because the Winter Olympics only come once every four years.

We are pleased to present the Digitization Centre Impact and Activity Report for 2016-2017!

This report highlights the Digitization Centre’s key projects, partnerships and user engagement trends for the 2016-2017 fiscal year.

In 2016-2017, Open Collections accounted for 15% of the Library’s unique pageviews. That 15% totals 3.9 million pageviews on Open Collections alone!

The breakdown of where those 3.9 million pageviews were spent.

Other highlights detailed in the report:

  • Our work with Archivematica and our continued contributions to UBC Library’s digital preservation program
  • News about our web archiving work, including updates on some of our new collections
  • The Digital Himalaya Project being done in collaboration with Mark Turin (Chair, First Nations & Endangered Languages Program; Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology)
  • Our ongoing partnerships
  • Our efforts on metadata updating and cleaning

 

  

New additions to our digital collections included:

BC Sessional Papers

Phase IV of the BC Sessional papers was completed, adding material from the Legislative Council of British Columbia from 1933 to 1952. Phase V began in May of 2017.

Hawthorn Fly Fishing & Angling Collection

A selection of 23 titles from the Harry Hawthorn Fly Fishing and Angling Collection housed at Woodward Library.

Rainbow Ranche

An archival collection from the Lake Country Museum and Archives, chronicling one of the first independent fruit ranches in the Okanagan.

The Pedestal

Canada’s first feminist periodical was fully digitized in partnership with SFU Archives and will be available through Open Collections soon.

Journal of a voyage to the Pacific and American Shores

UBC Library acquired and digitized the journal of Susannah Weynton, wife of the captain of the Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship Cowlitz.

BC Historical Newspapers

The BC Newspapers collection was completed this year. Encompassing 163 titles, these newspapers are utilized by researchers around the world. All pages have been run through OCR (optical character recognition) and are full-text searchable.

To learn more about what we’ve been up to over the past few years, check out all of our Impact Reports dating back to 2011 under the “Reports” section of our website’s Documentation page. Many thanks to all of our partners over the past years. We look forward to continued collaboration on all of our current and future projects!

We’ve got a special treat for the blog today! An advance peek at new digitizations:

Vintage Vancouver circa.1925-1933

This hand tinted shot of Vancouver taken between 1925 and 1933 is from some of the Uno Langmann Collection items awaiting digitization. It is a panorama taken from the Capitol Hill area over the Burrard Inlet showing much of Vancouver proper as well as North Vancouver.

From the photo you can see a clear view of the Lions mountains. In the lower righthand side you can see what is today known as the Second Narrows train crossing bridge. It is one of the few things that date the photo. The original bridge was constructed in 1925 mainly for train travel, and was the first to connect Vancouver to the North Shore. After being hit a number of times by ships passing through  it was bought in 1933 be the government, and had a lift section added- which is not seen here.

Here’s a video of the image being scanned. Curious? Learn more about our scanners!

 

 

On the left side of the photo you can see the Giant Dipper, a rollercoaster built in 1925, in what is now the PNE, but was then known as the Vancouver Exhibition. It  was demolished in 1948 to make room for an expanding Hastings Racecourse track.

There is also something missing from this photo. The Lions Gate Bridge isn’t hidden behind the clouds, it wasn’t built until 1938.

UL_1347_002

This photo has been edited to make the image easier to see – It is extremely faint in the original scan.

Other cool things to note about this image – it was printed on the back of “Empress Jam” cardboard. Empress Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,  imported coffees and made local jams and jellies and one of the earliest and most successful of the local food supply companies.

We’ve posted about the Uno Langmann BC Historical Photograph Collection before here, here, and here, but now we’ve got even more to talk about!

Like, for example, this newly uploaded photo:

Screen-Shot-2015-05-22-at-4.21.31-PM

Of the 4 people in this picture at least 2 are thinking only about that dog.

In case you want a refresher (and to know where this photo originates) – The Uno Langmann BC Historical Photograph Collection, with over 18,000 photographs, was donated by Uno Langmann a local Vancouver art dealer and his wife. It is considered an amazing collection of early photography, and local provincial history. The photos themselves span the ages – from 1850 all the way to the 1970s!

Today we want to announce lots of new albums from this collection have gone live! From only two albums last year at this time we now have more than 55 albums up for exploration- with more to come!

Take a bite out of the Uno Langmann BC Historical Photograph Collection! Click on any of the pictures to be taken to the albums.

Get a look into daily life…

Screen-Shot-2015-05-25-at-11.55.13-AM

A photo taken between 1895-1905 –Parenting the old school way…in between reading your books.

Screen-Shot-2015-05-22-at-4.38.54-PM

Titled “The Student” –This girl is ready to take on UBC in the fall don’t you think?

Screen-Shot-2015-05-22-at-4.20.24-PM

Whose up for watching the band play by the water? Everyone? Okay!

Local history is everywhere in these photos too, from the fire at Pier D in 1911, to the building of the Lions Gate Bridge.

Screen-Shot-2015-05-22-at-4.25.03-PM

Lions Gate bridge half built!

Screen-Shot-2015-06-03-at-10.06.05-AM

Fire at Pier D in 1911 – One of the largest and most infamous of the Vancouver waterfront fires.

Hope these images we’ve collected wet your appetite for more!

 

Ingrid Parent and Uno Langmann

Library Advisory Board member Haig Farris, University Librarian Ingrid Parent, Dr. Uno Langmann, UBC Chancellor Lindsay Gordon

During the May 22 spring convocation ceremony, the University of British Columbia conferred art and antiques dealer Uno Langmann with an honorary doctorate degree. Dr. Langmann donated over 18,000 rare and unique early photographs and books from the 1850s to the 1950s to UBC Library in 2014, forming the Uno Langmann Family Collection of B.C. Photographs.

The donation is considered to be a premiere private collection of early provincial photos in a wide variety of formats and genres, including albums, diaries, portraits, landscapes and city/townscapes. 

A First Nations family appear outside a dwelling (c. 1915-1925). Photograph: Uno Langmann Family Collection

A First Nations family appear outside a dwelling (c. 1915-1925)

In his speech, Dr. Langmann noted his choice of profession was guided by a love for history. With a personal collection of books containing over 12,000 titles, his donation to UBC was fueled by the sincere belief that the library is the backbone of any University and that this special collection would help elevate UBC’s reputation as one of the best institutions. Langmann advised the graduates before him to “use the finest computer yet developed, your brain,” adding that, “luck favours the prepared mind.”

The photographs in the Uno Langmann BC Historical Photograph Collection are preserved in our archives and have been mostly digitized and made public on the Library website. As of this month, there are now 55 albums available for exploration. Additionally, Library users are able to request an in-person viewing of items from the collection through UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections.

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