Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]

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In recent years, actors of Asian descent have been seen in increasingly diverse roles in theatre, television, and film. How can actors of Asian descent build careers in the performing arts? How do they navigate the expectations of mainstream culture while remaining connected with their cultural communities? Is there a role for Asian Canadian venues and arts organizations for nurturing and promoting talent?

About the Speakers:
Diana Bang was born in Vancouver, B.C. to Korean immigrant parents. She is a founding member of the Asian Canadian sketch comedy group Assaulted Fish. Her film and television credits include The Interview, Bates Motel and The Killing. She is currently based out of Vancouver.

Kuan Foo is currently the Diversity Advisor with the office of Access and Diversity at the University of British Columbia. He has been active in community-based arts and social justice groups for more years than he cares to remember. He is a founding member of Assaulted Fish and is perhaps best known for being “the guy who isn’t Nelson.”

Nelson Wong is a Vancouver actor known for his extensive film, television and stage work, including American Mary (2012), Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (2011) and Ice Blues (2008). He is alphabetically the last member of Assaulted Fish.


In partnership:

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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Creative Writing Department. Presented by the Chan Centre as part of the Beyond Words series. Multi-award winning novelist and UBC professor Steven Galloway, author of The Cellist of Sarajevo, explores magic in his newest book The Confabulist. This beautiful, suspense-filled novel uses the life and sudden death of turn-of-the-century magician and stunt performer Harry Houdini to weave a critically acclaimed tale of intrigue, love and illusion. Join Galloway for this magical (pun very much intended) evening of readings and sleight-of-hand as he is joined in performance by master magician David Gifford to examine reality and illusion, and the ways that imagination can alter what we perceive and believe. Post-show artist talk moderated by acclaimed Canadian author Miriam Toews.


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS). The colloquium is sponsored by the UBC Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program, a multidisciplinary degree Program offered by the Creative Writing Program, the English Department, and the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies in the Faculty of Arts; and the Department of Language and Literacy Education in the Faculty of Education. Kit Pearson is the author of over thirteen books for children, including middle grade novels in all genres, short stories, picture books, and non-fiction. Her books have been published in Canada in English and French, in the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, Japan, the Netherlands, Germany, Great Britain, France, China, and Korea. Her books have been awarded such honours as the Canadian Governor General’s Literary Award for Children’s Literature. She has received seventeen awards for her writing, including the B.C. Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Literary Excellence in 2014.

Kit was born in Edmonton, Alberta in 1947 and grew up there and in Vancouver, B.C. She received her B.A. from the University of Alberta, her M.L.S. from U.B.C.’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, and her M.A. from the Simmons College Center for the Study of Children’s Literature in Boston. She worked for ten years as a children’s librarian in Ontario and B.C., and is now a full-time writer living in Victoria. For more information see www.kitpearson.com


This event took place on November 27, 2014 at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.  An afternoon event with Terry Watada and Jim Wong-Chu, two pioneers of Asian Canadian writing, and moderated by Dr. Glenn Deer, Professor, English Department UBC, this fireside chat encompassed a wide range of topics, including the speakers’ memories of the early days of the Asian Canadian cultural studies movement.


Speaker Bio’s

1Terry Watada is a Toronto writer with many titles to his credit. His publications include The Sword, the Medal and the Rosary (a manga, HpF Press and the NAJC), The TBC: the Toronto Buddhist Church, 1995 – 2010, (non-fiction, HpF Press & the Toronto Buddhist Church 2010), Kuroshio: The Blood of Foxes, (novel, Arsenal Pulp Press 2007), Obon: the Festival of the Dead (poetry, Thistledown Press 2006), Ten Thousand Views of Rain (poetry, Thistledown Press 2001),Seeing the Invisible (a children’s biography, Umbrella Press 1998), Daruma Days (short fiction, Ronsdale Press 1997), Bukkyo Tozen: a History of Buddhism in Canada (non-fiction, HpF Press & the Toronto Buddhist Church 1996) and A Thousand Homes (poetry, Mercury Press 1995).

As a playwright, Watada has seen seven of his plays achieve mainstage production; his best known is perhaps Vincent, a play about a Toronto family dealing with a schizophrenic son. Workman Arts of Toronto has remounted it several times since its premiere in 1993. Most notably, it was produced at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa and the first and second Madness and Arts World Festival in Toronto and Muenster, Germany, respectively.  His essays have been published in such varied journals and books as Maclean’s Magazine (March 2011), Canadian Literature (UBC), Ritsumeikan Hogaku “Kotoba to sonohirogari” (Ritsumeikan University Press, Kyoto Jpn), Crossing the Ocean: Japanese American Culture from Past to Present, Jimbun-shoin Press (Kyoto Jpn), and Anti-Asian Violence in North America (AltaMira Press, California). He wrote a monthly column in the Japanese-Canadian national journal the Nikkei Voice for 25 years. He now contributes a monthly column for the Vancouver JCCA Bulletin which expanded its scope to a national level in 2012.

Among his numerous citations and awards, he was presented with the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal and the NAJC National Merit Award recognizing his writing, his music and his community volunteerism in 2013. His archives which include records, tapes, and significant artifacts of the Asian North American experience have been collected as the Terry Watada Special Collection and housed in the East Asian Library and his manuscripts (drafts and final), personal papers and books have been housed in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Robarts Library, University of Toronto.  He is awaiting the publication of his fourth collection of poetry – The Game of 100 Ghosts (TSAR Publications, Fall 2014) – and his second manga, Light at a Window (Toronto NAJC and HpF Press, Fall 2014).


jimJim Wong Chu was born in Hong Kong in 1949, and came to Canada in 1953 settling in Vancouver in 1961. Witness to and participant in much of the Chinese Canadian activism in the 1970s and early 80s, Jim became one of its documenters. After completing a degree in Creative Writing at UBC in the 1980s Jim published Chinatown Ghosts (Arsenal Pulp Press, 1986), the first book of poetry published by an Asian Canadian. As a persistent activist and cultural producer Jim co-founded the Asian Canadian Writers Workshop, Ricepaper Magazine, Pender Guy Radio, the Asian Canadian Performing Arts Resource (ACPAR), literASIAN: A Festival of Pacific Rim Asian Canadian Writing and the Vancouver Asian Heritage Month Festival. With the sheer girth of his activity Jim has been instrumental in creating a cultural scene inclusive of Asian Canadian talent.

Wong-Chu is among the first authors of Asian descent with the likes of SKY Lee and Paul Yee who challenged the Canadian literary establishment and questioned why it was devoid of any Asian writers. His book Chinatown Ghosts (Arsenal Pulp Press, 1986) was one of the first books of poetry by an Asian Canadian writer.  Wong-Chu later contributed to Inalienable Rice and co-edited Many Mouthed Birds, two of the earliest anthologies of Asian Canadian writing.  


3Dr. Glenn Deer completed his B.A. (Honours) at the University of Alberta and his M.A. and Ph.D. at York University, Toronto. His early interests were in contemporary poetry and phenomenological poetics and he wrote his M.A. thesis on Robert Creeley. Longspoon Press published a collection of his poetry in 1982. During his Ph.D. research, after completing comprehensive exams in Renaissance Literature, Rhetoric and Critical Theory, and Canadian Literature, he began to focus on discourse studies, the rhetoric of power in narrative fiction, and postmodernism and Canadian Literature. After completing his Ph.D. at York in 1987, he joined the English Department at the University of British Columbia to teach in the areas of rhetoric and Canadian Literature. McGill-Queen’s University Press published his study of ideology and discourse in Canadian fiction in 1994, Postmodern Canadian Fiction and the Rhetoric of Authority.

In 1993 Deer’s interests in ideology critique and the rhetoric of racialization developed into research on rhetorical representations of Asian Canadian culture in the local media and a series of directed readings with graduate students, graduate seminars, and undergraduate courses in the areas of comparative Asian Canadian and Asian American studies. He received a Vice-President’s grant in 1997 to organize the conference “Diversity, Writing, and Social Critique.” In 1999 he was the guest editor for a special issue of Canadian Literature on Asian Canadian writing (Number 163, December 1999), and he has been an associate editor with the journal since the summer of 2000. From 1999 to 2002, he served as the Chair of the First-Year Program in English.

Deer’s recent teaching and research interests include the politics of historiography in Michael Ondaatje, comparative studies of Asian American and Asian Canadian writing, mixed-race writing and trans-ethnic desire, the representations of food in trans-cultural writing, and the discourses of the nuclear. He has written an editorial for the Fall 2002 issue (number 172) of Canadian Literature on the aftermath of September 11: “Writing in the Shadow of the Bomb”.  His current graduate seminar is an attempt to work through some of the features of modern thought and literature that arise in the context of such global crises.


November 27, 3.00-4.00PM at the Dodson Room (Rm 302), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre



This talk is sponsored by the Asian Canadian and Asian Migration Studies Program and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

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Indian-Horse“Wagamese pulls off a fine balancing act: exposing the horrors of the country’s residential schools while also celebrating Canada’s national game.” – James Grainger, Globe & Mail

“Wagemese’s writing qualifies as an act of courage.” – Donna Bailey Nurse, National Post

“If we want to live at peace with ourselves, we need to tell our stories.” – Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese

In this emotional tale of Saul Indian Horse, Richard Wagamese tells the realistic story of a man whose life is drastically changed by one of Canada’s most painful histories. When Saul was a child he was taken away from his family and forced into an Indian Residential School where he witnessed and experienced unimaginable abuses at the hands of the school’s educators. In spite of the harrowing atrocities, it is at the school that Saul discovers his love of hockey, a game that, for a short time, serves as a means of escape. Saul’s talent leads to a draft with a minor league team and a spot on Team Canada during the 1972 Canada-Soviet Summit Series. However, as Saul grows into a man, he struggles with racism and alcohol addiction. Saul’s tumultuous adulthood eventually leads him back to his roots, where he confronts his past and begins a new journey towards healing.

Richard Wagamese is an Ojibway author from the Wabaseemoong First Nation in Northwestern Ontario. He is the author of several fiction and non-fiction works including For Joshua: An Ojibway Father Teaches His Son, Runaway Dreams, and Indian Horse. Wagamese has also been a journalist and, in 1991, became the first Aboriginal Canadian to receive the National Newspaper Award for Column Writing. His most recent novel, Indian Horse, was chosen as the winner of First Nation Communities Read, and is on the Globe and Mail’s bestseller’s list as well as the Canadian Booksellers Association’s bestseller’s list. Among his awards, Wagamese’s memoir One Native Life was listed as one of The Globe and Mail’s 100 Best Books of 2008. In 2010 he accepted an Honorary Doctor of Letters from Thompson Rivers University. Wagamese currently lives just outside of Kamloops, BC with his wife, Debra Powell, and Molly the Story Dog.

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