As part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, a myriad of scholars from a wide variety of disciplines discuss the topic of advancing health and inclusion.


Speakers

Laura Bulk (Rehabilitation Science) is part of the Being Blind team, working to expose misperceptions about what it means to be Blind, and to create an engaging campaign challenging such misperceptions.

Bulmaro Valdes (Biomedical Engineering) applies his science and engineering knowledge to help people with disabilities. He works directly with stroke survivors and therapists to develop new technological solutions to current rehabilitation issues.

Beth Clark (Interdisciplinary Studies) focuses on how transgender youth, their parents, caregivers, and health care providers can work together to make health care decisions that support trans youth well-being.

Stephanie Glegg (Rehabilitation Science) examines how relationships support/hinder evidence uptake in healthcare. By targeting the social influences that drive evidence use, she aims to improve patients’ timely access to healthcare innovations.

Aarthi Gobinath (Neuroscience) works on treating postpartum depression, investigating how different types of maternal antidepressant exposure affect the neurobiology of mothers and the male and female offspring in adulthood.

Celestin Hategeka (Population and Public Health) evaluates the effectiveness and implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention (ETAT+) in Rwanda to improve quality of hospital care for newborns and children.

Jaime Semchuk (Educational and Counselling Psychology) collaborates with high schools in BC to adapt, implement, and evaluate mental health literacy interventions with an aim to build capacity for promoting student wellbeing, reducing stigma, and effectively supporting students who experience mental health difficulties.

Evan Taylor (Language and Literacy Education) is a health literacy researcher and advocate whose work focuses on trans* and gender nonconforming people’s experiences of cancer and health decision-making.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bulk, L. et al. (2017). ‘We are not anything alike’: marginalization of health professionals with disabilities. Disability & Society. [Link]

Bulk, L., Glegg, S. et al. (2015). The legitimization process of students with disabilities in health and human service educational programs in Canada. Disability & Society. [Link]

Valdes, B. et al. (2016). Kinecting the moves: The kinematic potential of rehabilitation-specific gaming to inform treatment for hemiparesis. International Journal of Child Health and Human Development. [Link]

Clark, B. et al. (2017). “I would have preferred more options”: Accounting for non‐binary youth in health research. Nursing Inquiry. [Link]

Glegg, S., Livingstone, R., & Montgomery, I. (2016).Facilitating interprofessional evidence-based practice in paediatric rehabilitation: Development, implementation and evaluation of an online toolkit for health professionals. Disability and Rehabilitation. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Choleris, E., & Galea, L. A. M. (2017). Sex, hormones, and genotype interact to influence psychiatric disease, treatment, and behavioral research: Sex, hormones, and genotype in behavioral research. Journal of Neuroscience Research. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Mahmoud, R., & Galea, L. A. M. (2014). Influence of sex and stress exposure across the lifespan on endophenotypes of depression: Focus on behavior, glucocorticoids, and hippocampus. Frontiers in Neuroscience. [Link]

Hategeka, C., Mwai, L., & Tuyisenge, L. (2017).Implementing the emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care (ETAT+) clinical practice guidelines to improve quality of hospital care in rwandan district hospitals: Healthcare workers’ perspectives on relevance and challenges. [Link]

Hategeka, C., et al. (2017). Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda. Plos One. [Link]

Semchuk, J. (2016). Adolescent experiences of seeking and receiving support at school for significant mental health concerns. [Link]

Taylor, E. T. (2013). Transmen’s health care experiences: Ethical social work practice beyond the binary. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services. [Link]


The BC Breath of Life Archival Institute for First Nations Languages provides First Nations community language workers the opportunity to participate in a week-long Institute being hosted at the University of British Columbia from May 14-20, 2017, for the reclamation and revitalization of BC First Nations languages. Kim Lawson, Reference Librarian at the Xwi7xwa Library, speaks on the particular topic of archival research.

Modeled on the “Breath of Life” Language Restoration Workshops initiated in the mid-90s by the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, our objective is to promote active collaboration among people with a wide range of perspectives on language and culture to explore archives and museum collections at UBC in order to “breathe life” back into the manuscripts and other resources there, with the overarching goal of contributing to the health and sustainability of BC’s First Nations languages for future generations. Participants will be grouped into research teams, based on language affiliations, bringing together First Nations community language workers (broadly defined to include Elders, language learners, teachers, curriculum developers, and others working towards language vitality) and university-based scholars with diverse skills that can contribute to finding and interpreting materials relevant to language and culture reclamation. Team members will actively work together to study resources housed in various collections at UBC that are directly relevant to their languages. Team members will mentor one another and share their expertise throughout the program, building not only research resources, but also relationships for potential on-going collaboration.


How can rigorous research help us advance the concept and practice of social justice?  In the fourth event of the 2017 PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series, join us as eight doctoral students from the Public Scholars Initiative have seven minutes each to talk about their research on, and search for, social justice. Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Vancouver Public Library as part of the Public Scholars Initiative.


Speakers

Emma Feltes (Anthropology) works in partnership with Indigenous activists to delve into the history of the “Constitution Express”—a movement in the 1980s to assert Indigenous rights, nationhood, and self-determination during the patriation of Canada’s Constitution— with a view to inform our relations today.

Jocelyn Fraser (Mining Engineering) focuses on social risk and social responsibility in the international mining sector with a particular focus in Arequipa, Peru, where she investigates ways how mining companies can collaborate with communities to deliver tangible social benefits.

Maggie Low (IRES) collaborates with the Heiltsuk Nation in Bella Bella, BC, to investigate the implementation of a large scale land use agreement between Coastal First Nations and the BC government, as well the implications of the agreement for Indigenous well-being and governance.

Kyle Loewen (Geography) partners with labour communities in the US who are employed in “last-mile” delivery—the distance between retailer warehouses and a consumer’s home—to address labour-related issues and improve working conditions in this sector.

Jeremy Stone (Planning) collaborates with urban community organisations in Vancouver and New Orleans to explore gentrification practices in these cities from a multidisciplinary perspective, and seeks to increase the resilience of neighborhoods in the face of catastrophic change.

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry) collaborates with Natura Foundation Bolivia to explore the issues of participation, knowledge production and roles of different actors in the development of an indigenous-driven environmental intervention in Bolivia.

Alicia Luedke (Political Science) investigates the impact of global policies seeking to prevent and prohibit the use of sexual violence in war on armed group practices of rape and other-related offenses in conflict situations.

Sarah Fessenden (Anthropology) teams up with “Food Not Bombs” activists to understand and address commercial food-waste in the face of hunger; she works closely with donors and anti-hunger activists to find empowering ways of getting otherwise wasted food to people in need.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Feltes, E. (2015). Research as Guesthood: The Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Resolving Indigenous-Settler Relations in British Columbia. [Link]

Feltes, E. “We will help each other to be great and good”: The Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Resolving Indigenous-State Relations in Canada. [Link]

Fraser, J. Corporate responsibility and advocacy conviction: How the forces of passion and reason shape contemporary industrial issues. [Link]

Low, M. M. Negotiating Environmental Governance: Lessons from the Great Bear Rainforest Agreements in British Columbia, Canada. [Link]

Loewen, K. (2012). From Problems of Citizenship to Questions of Action. [Link]

Adeyeye, Y. et al. (2017). Human(e) Interactions with the Environment. [Link]

Luedke, A. E. (2014). Three types of wartime sexual violence: Recruitment and retention of armed combatants in civil war. [Link]

Fessenden, S. G. (2017). “We just wanna warm some bellies” : Food not bombs, anarchism, and recycling wasted food for protest . [Link]

Video sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Schools participate in the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) on a voluntary and annual basis. AESN schools link their inquiry specifically to Aboriginal ways of knowing. The Spiral of Inquiry provides school teams with the structure for guiding their improvement and innovation work. Participating schools develop and submit an inquiry focus, collaborate with colleagues through regional meetings, and share case studies in a spirit of generosity and curiosity.

Speakers:

Lynne Tomlinson (Director of Instruction), SD 45, West Vancouver

Trish Catherine (Teacher), Ecole Ballenas Secondary SD 69, Qualicum

Paul Boyd (Teacher) WL Seaton Secondary, SD 22, Vernon

Marcus Toneatto (Principal), South Okanagan Secondary School, SD 53, Okanagan Similkameen

Mary Neto (Teacher), Smithers Secondary, SD 54, Bulkley Valley

Roberta Edzerza, (District Principal, Aboriginal Education) and Sandy Pond (Principal), Charles Hays Secondary, SD 53, Prince Rupert

Robert Taddei, (Teacher), Frank Hurt Secondary SD 36, Surrey

 

 

 

 

 

 

As part of the 44th Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Information Science (CAIS), Jennifer Preece, Professor of the College of Information Studies at University of Maryland will be hosting a discussion about the new challenges for Information Studies in this period, known as the anthropocene. Humans are now having a profound influence on the planet, changing the atmosphere we breathe and reshaping the earth’s surface, thereby triggering species extinction at an alarming rate.

Information Studies professionals and students can have a profound influence on the data that is collected, how it is stored, retrieved and communicated with citizens and communities. We have a responsibility to help to heal our planet by raising awareness and triggering action. This talk challenges researchers, practitioners, teachers and students to lead the way in shaping a sustainable future. We can change information processes and technology, raise awareness, and engage citizens to contribute to science and their own communities by becoming “citizen scientists”.

This event happened on November 9, 2016.


Speaker:

Jennifer Preece, co-author of Interaction Design: Beyond Human Computer Interaction (4th Edition, 2015), helped to define research on online communities through her book Online Communities: Designing Usability, Supporting Sociability, 2000. Her current research focuses on information processes and technology for supporting citizen and environmental science; with an emphasis on community participation for collecting biodiversity data. Preece was dean of the College of Information Studies – Maryland’s iSchool for ten years from 2005 – 2015. Click here for further information about her career.

 


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Andrews, D., Nonnecke, B., & Preece, J. (2003). Electronic survey methodology: A case study in reaching hard-to-involve internet users. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 16(2), 185-210. doi:10.1207/S15327590IJHC1602_04 [Link]

Preece, J. (2016). Citizen science: New research challenges for human-computer interaction. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 32(8), 585-612. doi:10.1080/10447318.2016.1194153 [Link]

Sharp, H., Rogers, Y., & Preece, J. (2007). Interaction design: Beyond human-computer interaction (2nd ed.). Chichester;Hoboken, NJ;: Wiley. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks QA76.9.H85 P72 2007]

 


UBC Library Research Guides

Library Archival and Information Science

In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Human(e) Interactions with the Environment,” nine PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health.

This event happened on Wednesday, 15 March 2017.


Speakers

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry)

Evan Bowness (IRES)

Mollie Chapman (IRES)

Tugce Conger (IRES)

Jamie Fenneman (Botany)

Graham McDowell (IRES)

Emily Rugel (Population and Public Health)

Steve Williams (IRES)

Stefan Pauer (Law).


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Chapman, M. (2005). Once upon a time in volcán, costa rica: Integrating values into watershed management and poverty alleviation. Review of Policy Research, 22(6), 859-880. doi:10.1111/j.1541-1338.2005.00179.x [Link]

Comack, E., & Bowness, E. (2010). Dealing the race card: Public discourse on the policing of winnipeg’s inner-city communities. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 19(1), 34-50. [Link]

Toft, M., Adeyeye, Y., & Lund, J. (2015). The use and usefulness of inventory-based management planning to forest management: Evidence from community forestry in nepal. Forest Policy and Economics, 60, 35-49. doi:10.1016/j.forpol.2015.06.007 [Link]

Williams, S., Bradley, H., Devadson, R., & Erickson, M. (2013). Globalization and work. Cambridge: Polity Press. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks HD6955 .W55 2013]


UBC Library Research Guides

Education

“Reading Worlds at Home”

Featuring readings by Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, and Larissa Lai and a discussion of the film All Our Father’s Relations  by Elder Larry Grant and Sarah Ling.

The event was part of “Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures,” a public symposium bringing together scholars from across Canada, the US and Australia to consider the future of cosmopolitanism as a critical approach to scholarship and praxis. The symposium took place on UBC’s Vancouver campus from March 16-17, 2017 and featured an interview with Dr. Sneja Gunew (UBC) and a launch of her book, Post-multicultural Writers as Neo-cosmopolitan Mediators (Anthem Press) as well as a keynote address by Dr. Pheng Cheah (UC Berkeley) and more.

For more information about “Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures,” visit: http://worldsathome.arts.ubc.ca/

Speakers: Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, Larissa Lai (University of Calgary), Elder Larry Grant, Sarah Ling

Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bradley, A., & Bradley, A. (10/01/2010). International journal of refugee law: Beyond borders; cosmopolitanism and family reunification for refugees in canada Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ijrl/eeq025 [Link]

Breckenridge, C. A. (2002). Cosmopolitanism Duke University Press. [Link]

Cheah, P. (2016). What is a world : on postcolonial literature as world literature. Duke University Press [Link]

Gunew, S.M. (2017). Post-multicultural writers as neo-cosmopolitan mediators. Anthem Press [Ordered at Koerner Library, call number forthcoming]

Gunew, S. M., & Rizvi, F. (1994). Culture, difference and the arts. St Leonards, NSW, Australia: Allen & Unwin. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks DU120 .C85 1994]

Kwa, L. (2013). Sinuous. Winnipeg: Turnstone Press. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8571.W3 S56 2013]

Lai, L. (2014). Slanting I, imagining we Asian Canadian literary production in the 1980s and 1990s. Wilfrid Laurier University Press [Link]

Lai, L. (2002). Salt Fish Girl: A Novel. Toronto: T. Allen Publishers. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8573.A3775 S24 2002]

Mootoo, S. (2014). Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab. Toronto: Doubleday Canada [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8576.O569 M68 2014]


UBC Library Research Guides

Anthropology

Education

 

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