Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC iSchool. In the post-print information era, how do libraries manage scholarly information? Academic libraries have developed alongside technology, but technology is now changing the structures of information creation, dissemination, retrieval, and preservation. The use of technology in and by libraries, and by the scholars whom they serve, has raised new questions for librarians about their work and its place within the academy.

This presentation explores how forces and critical issues that are now shaping academic libraries are deepening their engagement with scholars and helping to build platforms and relationships that expand the pathways of creation, discovery, learning, and dialogue. We will consider several of these phenomena and how they may contribute to expanded roles for libraries and a new era of library work.

Speaker Bio

Susan E. Parker was appointed University Librarian at the University of British Columbia starting on September 1, 2017. She was previously the Deputy University Librarian at UCLA from 2005 until mid-2017, where she had a broad administrative and operations portfolio that included budget and fiscal planning, space planning and renovation, assessment, programming, and various user services. From 2015-2017, she served as interim Director of Library Special Collections. She was Associate Dean of the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge from 1997-2005.

Parker is known as a speaker and author of numerous publications on library leadership and disaster planning in libraries. Her ALA, LAMA, and ACRL service extends over more than 30 years. She earned a B.A. in History and English from Earlham College, an M.A. in U.S. history from Indiana University, a Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from Capella University, and the M.L.S. from Queens College, City University of New York. Parker was a member of the 2003 class of UCLA Senior Fellows and a member of the 2013-15 cohort of ARL Leadership Fellows.
iSchool Colloquia Series


 

Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Susan, E. Parker. (2012). Innovation and Change: Influences of Pre-Disaster Library Leadership in a Post-Disaster Environment. Advances in Library Administration and Organization, 31, 121-204. doi:10.1108/S0732-0671(2012)0000031006. [Link]

Susan E. Parker, Don Jaeger & Kristen Kern. (2008) What to Do When Disaster Strikes. The Serials Librarian, 44(3-4), 237-242, doi: 10.1300/J123v44n03_13. [Link]

 


UBC Library Research Guides

Library Resources for Teaching and Learning

Library, Archival, and Information Science


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC Reads Sustainability and the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Program.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his indigenous identity as a teenager and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability. Duncan McCue is the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue was a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. Now based in Toronto, his news and current affairs pieces continue to be featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National.

McCue’s work has garnered several RTNDA and Jack Webster Awards. He was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours including the Hillman Award for Investigative Journalism. McCue has spent years teaching journalism at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism and was recognized by the Canadian Ethnic Media Association with an Innovation Award for developing curriculum on Indigenous issues. He’s also an author: his book The Shoe Boy: A Trapline Memoir recounts a season he spent in a hunting camp with a Cree family in northern Quebec as a teenager. He was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (riic.ca). Before becoming a journalist, McCue studied English at the University of King’s College, then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. McCue is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario, and proud father of two children.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

The intrepid native reporter: Duncan McCue. Jones, M., Bear, J. and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2008).[Video/DVD] Vancouver: Moving Images Distribution.McCue, D., & Xwi7xwa Collection. [Link]

The shoe boy: A trapline memoir. New Westminster, British Columbia: Nonvella Publishing Inc. (2016). [Link]

Restorative justice: Capacity for forgiveness. McCue, D., Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2010).[Video/DVD] Toronto: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC with Equity and Inclusion.

#MeToo. #IWill. Awareness is important, but how do we move beyond hashtags and words to making substantive change to the workplace experience for women? It seems every day new accusations of harassment come to the fore – from Hollywood to Wall Street to Commercial Drive. In response, thousands of women have posted “#metoo” on social media, indicating that they too have been sexually assaulted or harassed. Men have since responded with #IWill, signaling their individual commitment to take action in order to prevent such events happening in their midst. The #metoo campaign demonstrates just how pervasive the everyday sexual harassment of women is. But what next? How can we change what seems to be an accepted way of treating women? How can we improve the workplace and what concrete role can each and every one us play in helping to do so? How do we go beyond awareness to actual – and more permanent – change? Join us for a panel discussion as we examine this timely and pervasive issue and explore options for moving forward.

This event is open to all members of the public and seeks to foster thoughtful dialogue on this important issue. We hope that participants walk away with broadened perspectives and inspired with ideas to help make change happen in their communities. Speakers:  Prof. Jennifer Berdahl, Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia (TBC) Fiona MacFarlane, Managing Partner and Chief Inclusiveness Officer, Ernst & Young, LLP (TBC) Chantelle Krish, Associate Director, Communications and Advocacy, YWCA (TBC) Moderator Sara-Jane Finlay, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Equity & Inclusion Office, The University of British Columbia


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). Harassment based on sex: Protecting social status in the context of gender hierarchy. The Academy of Management Review, 32(2), 641-658.  [Link]

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). The sexual harassment of uppity women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(2), 425-437. [Link]

O’Reilly, J., Robinson, S., Berdahl, J., & Banki, S. (2015). Is negative attention better than no attention? the comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work. Organization Science, 26(3), 774-793.  [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC with Equity and Inclusion.

#MeToo. #IWill. Awareness is important, but how do we move beyond hashtags and words to making substantive change to the workplace experience for women? It seems every day new accusations of harassment come to the fore – from Hollywood to Wall Street to Commercial Drive. In response, thousands of women have posted “#metoo” on social media, indicating that they too have been sexually assaulted or harassed. Men have since responded with #IWill, signaling their individual commitment to take action in order to prevent such events happening in their midst. The #metoo campaign demonstrates just how pervasive the everyday sexual harassment of women is. But what next? How can we change what seems to be an accepted way of treating women? How can we improve the workplace and what concrete role can each and every one us play in helping to do so? How do we go beyond awareness to actual – and more permanent – change? Join us for a panel discussion as we examine this timely and pervasive issue and explore options for moving forward.

This event is open to all members of the public and seeks to foster thoughtful dialogue on this important issue. We hope that participants walk away with broadened perspectives and inspired with ideas to help make change happen in their communities. Speakers:  Prof. Jennifer Berdahl, Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia (TBC) Fiona MacFarlane, Managing Partner and Chief Inclusiveness Officer, Ernst & Young, LLP (TBC) Chantelle Krish, Associate Director, Communications and Advocacy, YWCA (TBC) Moderator Sara-Jane Finlay, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Equity & Inclusion Office, The University of British Columbia


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). Harassment based on sex: Protecting social status in the context of gender hierarchy. The Academy of Management Review, 32(2), 641-658.  [Link]

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). The sexual harassment of uppity women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(2), 425-437. [Link]

O’Reilly, J., Robinson, S., Berdahl, J., & Banki, S. (2015). Is negative attention better than no attention? the comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work. Organization Science, 26(3), 774-793.  [Link]

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