This year marks the 50th anniversary of the annual Marion Woodward Lecture series made possible with the continuing support of the Mr. and Mrs. P.A. Woodward’s Foundation.

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC School of Nursing.

Presented by: Dr. Dawn Stacey, Professor & University Research Chair in Knowledge Translation to Patients, University of Ottawa

Mounting evidence demonstrates that engaging patients and the public as partners in healthcare decisions at both individual and community levels leads to better outcomes. However, patients and the public are not adequately engaged across a spectrum of health services and at multiple levels. This presentation will discuss evidence-based strategies and tools for supporting active patient and public involvement to put ‘patients first’ when making decisions about healthcare policies, research, organization governance, and direct care.

Dawn Stacey, RN, PhD, CON(C), holds a Research Chair in Knowledge Translation to Patients and is a Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Ottawa. She is the Scientific Director of the Patient Decision Aids Research Group at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. She was inducted as a member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada in recognition of her research. She leads the Cochrane Review of Patient Decision Aids, and co-chairs the Steering Committee for the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration.

Dr. Stacey’s internationally recognized research aims to understand, measure, and evaluate implementation of decision coaching and decision support tools for patients and healthcare professionals. She leads national and international initiatives to synthesize effective interventions and develop standards for translating scientific knowledge into user-friendly tools. Her research findings are used in clinical practice, continuing education for healthcare professionals, and health policy in Canada, Chile, the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia.


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumniUBC

Throughout his career, including his three terms as mayor of the City of Calgary, Naheed Nenshi has always emphasized the importance of civic engagement. On November 1st, join fellow UBC alumni, students, and friends in Vancouver for the next Master Mind Master Class where he will deliver the talk “Creating the Cities and Country We Deserve.”

The Master Mind Master Class speaker series is an alumni UBC program that offers an unprecedented look into the minds of modern thinkers making a unique impact on the world, and the lessons they’ve learned.

Speaker Biography
Naheed Nenshi, A’paistootsiipsii, was sworn in as Calgary’s 36th mayor on October 25, 2010 and was re-elected in 2013 and 2017.

Prior to being elected, Mayor Nenshi was with McKinsey and Company, later forming his own business to help public, private and non-profit organizations grow. He designed policy for the Government of Alberta, helped create a Canadian strategy for The Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy, and worked with the United Nations to determine how business can help the poorest people on the planet. He then entered academia, where he was Canada’s first tenured professor in the field of nonprofit management, at Mount Royal University’s Bissett School of Business.

For his work, Mayor Nenshi was named a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum, was awarded the President’s Award from the Canadian Institute of Planners, and received the Humanitarian Award from the Canadian Psychological Association for his contributions to community mental health. In 2013, after his stewardship of the community during devastating flooding, Maclean’s magazine called him the second-most influential person in Canada, after the Prime Minister. He was also awarded the 2014 World Mayor Prize by the UK-based City Mayor’s Foundation as the best mayor in the world.

In 2014, he was also honoured by Elder Pete Standing Alone with the Blackfoot name A’paistootsiipsii, which means “Clan Leader” or “He who moves camp and the others follow”. In 2016, Elder Bruce Starlight of the Tsuu T’ina First Nation honoured him with the name Iitiya: “Always Ready”.

Mayor Nenshi holds a Bachelor of Commerce (with distinction) from the University of Calgary, where he was President of the Students’ Union, and a Master in Public Policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, where he studied as a Kennedy Fellow.

Moderator Biography
Anita Bathe

As the lead reporter for CBC News at 6pm, Anita Bathe takes viewers through some of the most important stories happening around Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley every night. Anita is an award-winning journalist for her coverage of breaking news.  She has been awarded two local BCAB awards, two local RTDNA awards, a national RTDNA, and the Jack Webster Fellowship. Her job is different every day and that’s what she loves about it.  One day she will be out covering the latest news on BC’s premier, the next day she may be braving the elements bringing live coverage of the latest snowfall.

When she’s not working, Anita enjoys experiencing new places and new cultures through travel. She can also be found reading a good book or attempting to cook up a new dish.


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC iSchool. In the post-print information era, how do libraries manage scholarly information? Academic libraries have developed alongside technology, but technology is now changing the structures of information creation, dissemination, retrieval, and preservation. The use of technology in and by libraries, and by the scholars whom they serve, has raised new questions for librarians about their work and its place within the academy.

This presentation explores how forces and critical issues that are now shaping academic libraries are deepening their engagement with scholars and helping to build platforms and relationships that expand the pathways of creation, discovery, learning, and dialogue. We will consider several of these phenomena and how they may contribute to expanded roles for libraries and a new era of library work.

Speaker Bio

Susan E. Parker was appointed University Librarian at the University of British Columbia starting on September 1, 2017. She was previously the Deputy University Librarian at UCLA from 2005 until mid-2017, where she had a broad administrative and operations portfolio that included budget and fiscal planning, space planning and renovation, assessment, programming, and various user services. From 2015-2017, she served as interim Director of Library Special Collections. She was Associate Dean of the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge from 1997-2005.

Parker is known as a speaker and author of numerous publications on library leadership and disaster planning in libraries. Her ALA, LAMA, and ACRL service extends over more than 30 years. She earned a B.A. in History and English from Earlham College, an M.A. in U.S. history from Indiana University, a Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from Capella University, and the M.L.S. from Queens College, City University of New York. Parker was a member of the 2003 class of UCLA Senior Fellows and a member of the 2013-15 cohort of ARL Leadership Fellows.
iSchool Colloquia Series


 

Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Susan, E. Parker. (2012). Innovation and Change: Influences of Pre-Disaster Library Leadership in a Post-Disaster Environment. Advances in Library Administration and Organization, 31, 121-204. doi:10.1108/S0732-0671(2012)0000031006. [Link]

Susan E. Parker, Don Jaeger & Kristen Kern. (2008) What to Do When Disaster Strikes. The Serials Librarian, 44(3-4), 237-242, doi: 10.1300/J123v44n03_13. [Link]

 


UBC Library Research Guides

Library Resources for Teaching and Learning

Library, Archival, and Information Science


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]

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