Video sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Schools participate in the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) on a voluntary and annual basis. AESN schools link their inquiry specifically to Aboriginal ways of knowing. The Spiral of Inquiry provides school teams with the structure for guiding their improvement and innovation work. Participating schools develop and submit an inquiry focus, collaborate with colleagues through regional meetings, and share case studies in a spirit of generosity and curiosity.

Speakers:

Lynne Tomlinson (Director of Instruction), SD 45, West Vancouver

Trish Catherine (Teacher), Ecole Ballenas Secondary SD 69, Qualicum

Paul Boyd (Teacher) WL Seaton Secondary, SD 22, Vernon

Marcus Toneatto (Principal), South Okanagan Secondary School, SD 53, Okanagan Similkameen

Mary Neto (Teacher), Smithers Secondary, SD 54, Bulkley Valley

Roberta Edzerza, (District Principal, Aboriginal Education) and Sandy Pond (Principal), Charles Hays Secondary, SD 53, Prince Rupert

Robert Taddei, (Teacher), Frank Hurt Secondary SD 36, Surrey

 

 

 

 

 

 

As part of the 44th Annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Information Science (CAIS), Jennifer Preece, Professor of the College of Information Studies at University of Maryland will be hosting a discussion about the new challenges for Information Studies in this period, known as the anthropocene. Humans are now having a profound influence on the planet, changing the atmosphere we breathe and reshaping the earth’s surface, thereby triggering species extinction at an alarming rate.

Information Studies professionals and students can have a profound influence on the data that is collected, how it is stored, retrieved and communicated with citizens and communities. We have a responsibility to help to heal our planet by raising awareness and triggering action. This talk challenges researchers, practitioners, teachers and students to lead the way in shaping a sustainable future. We can change information processes and technology, raise awareness, and engage citizens to contribute to science and their own communities by becoming “citizen scientists”.

This event happened on November 9, 2016.


Speaker:

Jennifer Preece, co-author of Interaction Design: Beyond Human Computer Interaction (4th Edition, 2015), helped to define research on online communities through her book Online Communities: Designing Usability, Supporting Sociability, 2000. Her current research focuses on information processes and technology for supporting citizen and environmental science; with an emphasis on community participation for collecting biodiversity data. Preece was dean of the College of Information Studies – Maryland’s iSchool for ten years from 2005 – 2015. Click here for further information about her career.

 


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Andrews, D., Nonnecke, B., & Preece, J. (2003). Electronic survey methodology: A case study in reaching hard-to-involve internet users. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 16(2), 185-210. doi:10.1207/S15327590IJHC1602_04 [Link]

Preece, J. (2016). Citizen science: New research challenges for human-computer interaction. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 32(8), 585-612. doi:10.1080/10447318.2016.1194153 [Link]

Sharp, H., Rogers, Y., & Preece, J. (2007). Interaction design: Beyond human-computer interaction (2nd ed.). Chichester;Hoboken, NJ;: Wiley. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks QA76.9.H85 P72 2007]

 


UBC Library Research Guides

Library Archival and Information Science

In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Human(e) Interactions with the Environment,” nine PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health.

This event happened on Wednesday, 15 March 2017.


Speakers

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry)

Evan Bowness (IRES)

Mollie Chapman (IRES)

Tugce Conger (IRES)

Jamie Fenneman (Botany)

Graham McDowell (IRES)

Emily Rugel (Population and Public Health)

Steve Williams (IRES)

Stefan Pauer (Law).


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Chapman, M. (2005). Once upon a time in volcán, costa rica: Integrating values into watershed management and poverty alleviation. Review of Policy Research, 22(6), 859-880. doi:10.1111/j.1541-1338.2005.00179.x [Link]

Comack, E., & Bowness, E. (2010). Dealing the race card: Public discourse on the policing of winnipeg’s inner-city communities. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 19(1), 34-50. [Link]

Toft, M., Adeyeye, Y., & Lund, J. (2015). The use and usefulness of inventory-based management planning to forest management: Evidence from community forestry in nepal. Forest Policy and Economics, 60, 35-49. doi:10.1016/j.forpol.2015.06.007 [Link]

Williams, S., Bradley, H., Devadson, R., & Erickson, M. (2013). Globalization and work. Cambridge: Polity Press. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks HD6955 .W55 2013]


UBC Library Research Guides

Education

Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures is a public symposium bringing together scholars from across Canada, the US and Australia to consider the future of cosmopolitanism as a critical approach to scholarship and praxis. The program will feature an interview with Dr. Sneja Gunew (UBC) and a launch of her book, Post-multicultural Writers as Neo-cosmopolitan Mediators (Anthem Press), a keynote address by Dr. Pheng Cheah (UC Berkeley) and more.

Speakers: Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, Larissa Lai (University of Calgary) 


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bradley, A., & Bradley, A. (10/01/2010). International journal of refugee law: Beyond borders; cosmopolitanism and family reunification for refugees in canada Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ijrl/eeq025 [Link]

Breckenridge, C. A. (2002). Cosmopolitanism Duke University Press. [Link]

Gunew, S. M., & Rizvi, F. (1994). Culture, difference and the arts. St Leonards, NSW, Australia: Allen & Unwin. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks DU120 .C85 1994]


UBC Library Research Guides

Anthropology

Education

 

In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Explorations in Culture and Diversity,” eight PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health.

This event happened on Thursday, March 23, 2017.


Speakers

Ashli Akins (Interdisciplinary Studies)

Eury Chang (Theatre)

Severn Cullis-Suzuki (Anthroplogy)

Claire Fogal (Theatre)

Gregory Gan (Anthropology)

Lily Ivanova (Sociology)

Stephanie Nakagawa (Opera)

Teilhard Paradela (History)


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Chang, E. C. (01/01/2015). Theatre research in canada: Towards reconciliation: Immigration in marty chan’s the forbidden phoenix and david yee’s lady in the red dress Graduate Centre for Study of Drama. [Link]

Cullis-Suzuki, S. (2007). Notes from canada’s young activists : A generation stands up for change Greystone Books. [Link]

Gan, G. (2015). Soaring to dizzying heights: Christ the saviour cathedral as a historical arena for the persecution of pussy riot. Critique of Anthropology, 35(2), 166-186. doi:10.1177/0308275X15569852 [Link]

Ivanova, L. (2014). The cultural transmission of morals : A case study of western visitors to cambodia’s genocide museums [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Anthropology

Education

Sociology

Theatre

Research Day showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

Questions about social media as sources of information about individuals (of different ages, genders, backgrounds) and communities, their uses in our personal and professional lives, and impact on our practices and overall well-being are central to the work of students and scholars across all our iSchool programs. Recognizing this common ground, this year’s Research Day will focus on the broad topic of “information, social media, and well-being,” considering the many connections social media now have with the way we do information, library, and archival studies.

This event happened on March 10, 2017.


Speaker:

Lyle Ungar, Professor of Computer And Information Science, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 200 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on eleven patents. His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including spectral methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

“Social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect portal onto people’s lives.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.”


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Smith, R. J., Crutchley, P., Schwartz, H. A., Ungar, L., Shofer, F., Padrez, K. A., & Merchant, R. M. (2017). Variations in Facebook Posting Patterns Across Validated Patient Health Conditions: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(1), e7. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Kern, M. L., Park, G., Eichstaedt, J. C., Schwartz, H. A., Sap, M., Smith, L. K., & Ungar, L. H. (2016). Gaining insights from social media language: Methodologies and challenges. [Link]

Sinnenberg, L., DiSilvestro, C. L., Mancheno, C., Dailey, K., Tufts, C., Buttenheim, A. M., … & Asch, D. A. (2016). Twitter as a Potential Data Source for Cardiovascular Disease Research. Jama cardiology, 1(9), 1032-1036. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Brooks, S. (05/01/2015). Computers in human behavior: Does personal social media usage affect efficiency and well-being? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.053 [Link]

Gerson, J., Plagnol, A. C., & Corr, P. J. (10/01/2016). Computers in human behavior: Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on facebook? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Computer Science

Information Visualization

 

This session aims to identify ways to support and promote accurate information about Aboriginal people, identify how current library structures may be barriers to full inclusion for Aboriginal students and how to address them, and identify power issues at play in our own instructional practice and how to make positive changes. Panelists are asked to consider the following questions:

How do you help your community find themselves in your collection or in your course?
How do you Indigenize your instruction?


Panelists

Deborah Lee is a Cree, Mohawk and Métis librarian. She worked as a Reference Librarian at the National Library of Canada / Library and Archives Canada for seven years. In 2007, Deborah became the Indigenous Studies Portal Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UofS since 2011. Deborah has presented widely at local, national and international conferences, including ACRL in 2015.

Patricia Geddes is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She is a Liaison Librarian for Aboriginal Education Services, First Nations Studies, and the Faculty of Academic and Career Preparation.

Jenna Walsh was born in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory and grew up in an inner city neighbourhood with a diverse Aboriginal population. At the University of British Columbia, her Interdisciplinary BA focused on global Indigeneity, and she did the First Nations Curriculum Concentration program for her MLIS.

Kim Lawson is Heiltsuk with English/ Danish ancestry. She is one of the authors of the “Protocols for Native American Archival Materials,” was the Archivist/ Librarian at The Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, has an MLIS from UBC and is learning to speak Heiltsuk.

Camille Callison is a member of the Tahltan First Nation and the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work at the University of Manitoba, Member of the UM Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) and has presented extensively on Indigenous Library & Archives issues.

Moderator

Sarah Dupont’s ancestry is Metis, French, and British. She is from Prince George, BC and is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UBC Library, where she works in the Xwi7xwa Library and Irving K Barber Learning Centre. Her liaison areas include Indigenous Education and Indigenous Social Work. Sarah is the project manager for Indigitization, a UBC program to support First Nations digitization and preservation of their community resources.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Doerksen, K., Karen Doerksen, & Carla Martin. (03/01/2016). Partnership: A loose coupling: Aboriginal participation in library education – A selective literature review The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. doi:10.21083/partnership.v10i2.3337 [Link]

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Kelly, B., & Barbara Kelly. (01/01/2011). Partnership: Reflecting the lives of aboriginal women in canadian public library collection development The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Publishers, Distributors & News Media

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

 

 

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. The Archives Association of British Columbia (AABC) and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre are pleased to present the webcast roundtable “Talking with First Nations Archives. ” Colleagues who work in local First Nations Archives, Resource Centres and in Records Management programs will share their experiences establishing archives, their role in facilitating access to records, and issues and concerns they encounter on a daily basis.

This event happened on February 23, 2017.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Lawson, K. L. (2004, November 24). Precious fragments : First Nations materials in archives, libraries and museums (T). [Link]

UBC Library Research Guides

Archival Material

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Library & Archival Studies

As scholars, we have a critical responsibility to uphold principles such as intellectual honesty, rigour, and open communication. Those who work outside the academy, or whose scholarship spans the academic and non-academic realms, have additional responsibilities and often face more complex or different ethical dilemmas and conflicting moral imperatives in their work. This workshop will feature three experts speaking to the ethical dimensions of scholarship in different contexts: in work involving community engagement or partnership, in the health field, and in the work of ‘public intellectuals’ from any sector.

This event happened on February 16, 2017.


Panelist Speakers

Susan Porter (Dean & Vice-Provost, Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies)
Simon Donner (UBC Geography)
Nina Preto (Ethicist, Provincial Health Services Authority)
Karen Bartlett (School of Population and Public Health)


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Kipnis, K. (01/01/1999). Ethics: The responsible scholar: Ethical considerations in the humanities and social sciences University of Chicago Press. [Link]

Patterson, B. (2000). Liberal education: An ethos of learning: Forming ethical scholars through experiential education Association of American Colleges. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Education

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing as part of the Marion Woodward Lecture. Professor John Keady will share the intervention work that he is leading with an interdisciplinary Dementia and Ageing Research Team [DART] based at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at the University of Manchester. DART have developed programs of work based around creative social research methods and the joint creation of knowledge with people living with dementia and their family/social networks.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Keady, a Nursing Professor of Older People’s Mental Health at the University of Manchester, is also the Chief Investigator of the five-year ESRC/NIHR Neighbourhoods and Dementia mixed methods, multi-site, research study [2014-2019] which is funded as part of the UK Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia. The Neighbourhoods Study includes a program of work located at the Center for Dementia Research at Linköping University, Sweden. An overview of the Neighbourhoods Study will be shared and will include a focus on the role that people with dementia are playing on the research program. His presentation will conclude with locating neighbourhoods within the wider context of the dementia friendly community movement and the role of nursing in transforming approaches to care through the personal empowerment of people living with dementia.

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