Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC Reads Sustainability and the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Program.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his indigenous identity as a teenager and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability. Duncan McCue is the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue was a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. Now based in Toronto, his news and current affairs pieces continue to be featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National.

McCue’s work has garnered several RTNDA and Jack Webster Awards. He was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours including the Hillman Award for Investigative Journalism. McCue has spent years teaching journalism at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism and was recognized by the Canadian Ethnic Media Association with an Innovation Award for developing curriculum on Indigenous issues. He’s also an author: his book The Shoe Boy: A Trapline Memoir recounts a season he spent in a hunting camp with a Cree family in northern Quebec as a teenager. He was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (riic.ca). Before becoming a journalist, McCue studied English at the University of King’s College, then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. McCue is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario, and proud father of two children.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

The intrepid native reporter: Duncan McCue. Jones, M., Bear, J. and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2008).[Video/DVD] Vancouver: Moving Images Distribution.McCue, D., & Xwi7xwa Collection. [Link]

The shoe boy: A trapline memoir. New Westminster, British Columbia: Nonvella Publishing Inc. (2016). [Link]

Restorative justice: Capacity for forgiveness. McCue, D., Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2010).[Video/DVD] Toronto: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC with Equity and Inclusion.

#MeToo. #IWill. Awareness is important, but how do we move beyond hashtags and words to making substantive change to the workplace experience for women? It seems every day new accusations of harassment come to the fore – from Hollywood to Wall Street to Commercial Drive. In response, thousands of women have posted “#metoo” on social media, indicating that they too have been sexually assaulted or harassed. Men have since responded with #IWill, signaling their individual commitment to take action in order to prevent such events happening in their midst. The #metoo campaign demonstrates just how pervasive the everyday sexual harassment of women is. But what next? How can we change what seems to be an accepted way of treating women? How can we improve the workplace and what concrete role can each and every one us play in helping to do so? How do we go beyond awareness to actual – and more permanent – change? Join us for a panel discussion as we examine this timely and pervasive issue and explore options for moving forward.

This event is open to all members of the public and seeks to foster thoughtful dialogue on this important issue. We hope that participants walk away with broadened perspectives and inspired with ideas to help make change happen in their communities. Speakers:  Prof. Jennifer Berdahl, Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia (TBC) Fiona MacFarlane, Managing Partner and Chief Inclusiveness Officer, Ernst & Young, LLP (TBC) Chantelle Krish, Associate Director, Communications and Advocacy, YWCA (TBC) Moderator Sara-Jane Finlay, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Equity & Inclusion Office, The University of British Columbia


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). Harassment based on sex: Protecting social status in the context of gender hierarchy. The Academy of Management Review, 32(2), 641-658.  [Link]

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). The sexual harassment of uppity women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(2), 425-437. [Link]

O’Reilly, J., Robinson, S., Berdahl, J., & Banki, S. (2015). Is negative attention better than no attention? the comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work. Organization Science, 26(3), 774-793.  [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC with Equity and Inclusion.

#MeToo. #IWill. Awareness is important, but how do we move beyond hashtags and words to making substantive change to the workplace experience for women? It seems every day new accusations of harassment come to the fore – from Hollywood to Wall Street to Commercial Drive. In response, thousands of women have posted “#metoo” on social media, indicating that they too have been sexually assaulted or harassed. Men have since responded with #IWill, signaling their individual commitment to take action in order to prevent such events happening in their midst. The #metoo campaign demonstrates just how pervasive the everyday sexual harassment of women is. But what next? How can we change what seems to be an accepted way of treating women? How can we improve the workplace and what concrete role can each and every one us play in helping to do so? How do we go beyond awareness to actual – and more permanent – change? Join us for a panel discussion as we examine this timely and pervasive issue and explore options for moving forward.

This event is open to all members of the public and seeks to foster thoughtful dialogue on this important issue. We hope that participants walk away with broadened perspectives and inspired with ideas to help make change happen in their communities. Speakers:  Prof. Jennifer Berdahl, Sauder School of Business, The University of British Columbia (TBC) Fiona MacFarlane, Managing Partner and Chief Inclusiveness Officer, Ernst & Young, LLP (TBC) Chantelle Krish, Associate Director, Communications and Advocacy, YWCA (TBC) Moderator Sara-Jane Finlay, PhD, Associate Vice-President, Equity & Inclusion Office, The University of British Columbia


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). Harassment based on sex: Protecting social status in the context of gender hierarchy. The Academy of Management Review, 32(2), 641-658.  [Link]

Berdahl, J. L. (2007). The sexual harassment of uppity women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(2), 425-437. [Link]

O’Reilly, J., Robinson, S., Berdahl, J., & Banki, S. (2015). Is negative attention better than no attention? the comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work. Organization Science, 26(3), 774-793.  [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC Himalaya Program .

This conversation will give both authors the space to discuss their recently published novels, short stories, and non-fiction, and exchange their perspectives on what it means to represent Nepal and Tibet in the English-language literary scene in Canada and abroad.
Speaker Biographies:

Tsering Wangmo Dhompa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manjushree_Thapa) is the author of three collections of poetry: My rice tastes like the lake, In the Absent Everyday and Rules of the House (all from Apogee Press, Berkeley). My rice tastes like the lake was a finalist for the Northern California Independent Bookseller’s Book of the Year Award for 2012. Dhompa’s first non-fiction book, Coming Home to Tibet was published by Shambhala Publications in 2016. She teaches creative writing and is a PhD candidate in Literature at the University of California in Santa Cruz.

Manjushree Thapa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsering_Wangmo_Dhompa) is the author of three novels, a short story collection and three nonfiction books about her homeland, Nepal. She is also a literary translator, and her translation of Darjeeling author Indra Bahadur Rai’s novel There’s a Carnival Today was released in South Asia in October 2017. The Canadian edition of her latest novel, All of Us in Our Own Lives, will be out in 2018. She lives in Toronto.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Dhompa, T. W. (2005). In the absent everyday. Berkeley, Calif: Apogee Press. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2005). Forget kathmandu: An elegy for democracy. New York, New York;New Delhi;: Penguin, Viking. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2004). friends. Manoa, 16(2), 169-183. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC. For years the possibility of new and expanded pipelines running across BC have raised questions related to First Nations land rights, coastal tanker traffic, and the nature of inter-provincial relationships. Underlying these questions, however, has always been the larger question of why we are continuing to invest in fossil fuel infrastructure at all given our international climate commitments. Join our panel of experts as they examine the economic, environmental, and public policy ramifications of the recent approvals.

Moderator:

Dan Burritt, BA’04 – Host and Producer, CBC Vancouver News

Speakers

Kathryn Harrison, PhD’93 – Professor, Political Science, UBC Faculty of Arts

George Hoberg – Professor, Liu Institute for Global Studies, UBC

Stewart Muir, MA’94 – Executive Director, Resource Works

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip – President, Union of BC Indian Chiefs

Solomon Reece – President and CEO, Four Eagles Sustainable Development


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Hoberg, G. (2013). The battle over oil sands access to tidewater: A political risk analysis of pipeline alternatives. Canadian Public Policy / Analyse De Politiques, 39(3), 371-391. [Link]

Hoberg, G., & Meadowcroft, J. (2015). Climate action. Alternatives Journal, 41(1), 58. [Link]

St-Laurent, G., Hagerman, S., & Hoberg, G. (2017). Emergence and influence of a new policy regime: The case of forest carbon offsets in british columbia. Land use Policy, 60, 169-180. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing.

People with mental illness and substance use challenges are among the most stigmatized population in the world. The field of neuroscience is making strides to redress this by changing the etiological paradigm from a pejorative behavior model to one that is brain based. Evidence from neuroscience serves as a powerful agent for challenging problematic beliefs and attitudes held by healthcare providers and society. Translating this evidence to current and future healthcare providers, to patients and the public, will contribute to breaking down barriers that prevent persons experiencing these challenges from seeking and utilizing treatment.

Bio: Deborah Finnell has specialized in mental health and addictions for most her nursing career. From her grounding as a registered nurse working in inpatient psychiatry, she expanded her role to that of a clinical nurse specialist and then a nurse practitioner. She brings her passion for the neurobiological bases of mental illness and substance use to her clinical practice, teaching, research, and policy/advocacy work. With funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dr. Finnell led the integration of substance-use related content including screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) into the nursing curricula at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She advocates for expanded access to mental illness and substance use treatment, such as calling for advanced practice nurses to prescribe buprenorphine. During her tenure with the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Hospital Administration, she conducted funded research focusing on improving the health of Veterans with mental and substance use disorders. Her professional leadership roles range from past chair of the New York State Peer Assistance Committee to past president of the International Nurses Society on Addictions. She served as chair of the Addictions Nursing Certification Board and was a member of the Committee on Nursing Standards for the American Nurses Association. She currently serves on the board of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) and is associate editor of that organization’s professional journal, Substance Abuse.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Carey, M. G., Al-Zaiti, S. S., Dean, G. E., Sessanna, L., & Finnell, D. S. (2011). Sleep problems, depression, substance use, social bonding, and quality of life in professional firefighters. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 53(8), 928-933. [Link]

Crickman, R., & Finnell, D. (2016;2015;). Systematic review of control measures to reduce hazardous drug exposure for health care workers. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 31(2), 183-190. [Link]

Sanchez, M., & Finnell, D. (2017). Alcohol screening and brief intervention for persons living with HIV. Janac-Journal of the Association of Nurses in Aids Care, 28(2), 266-278. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC iSchool.

Abstract: In this talk, I seek to understand what we mean by information access, and what it means to provide information access in a responsible way. Specifically, I examine the idea of facts. How should providers of information deal with facts? To examine this question, I consider the 2017 protest slogan “Librarians for Facts.” What does this slogan really mean? Ultimately, I suggest that information providers need to determine what they are for, and orient information access mechanisms toward that goal.

Bio: Melanie Feinberg is an Associate Professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a classificationist whose research approach combines design with the humanities. Her work focuses on learning how to read and write databases to complement our engineering and mining of them. She received her PhD in 2008 from the iSchool at the University of Washington; she has a master’s from the iSchool at Berkeley (2004) and was an undergraduate at Stanford (1992). In her professional career before returning to academia, she was a content strategist and technical editor, working at companies such as Apple Computer, Scient, and PeopleSoft.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Feinberg, M. (2017). Reading databases: Slow information interactions beyond the retrieval paradigm. Journal of Documentation, 73(2), 336-356. [Link]

Feinberg, M. (2017). The value of discernment: Making use of interpretive flexibility in metadata generation and aggregation. Information Research-an International Electronic Journal, 22(1), 1. [Link]

Feinberg, M. (2011). How information systems communicate as documents: The concept of authorial voice. Journal of Documentation, 67(6), 1015-1037. [Link]


As part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, a myriad of scholars from a wide variety of disciplines discuss the topic of advancing health and inclusion.


Speakers

Laura Bulk (Rehabilitation Science) is part of the Being Blind team, working to expose misperceptions about what it means to be Blind, and to create an engaging campaign challenging such misperceptions.

Bulmaro Valdes (Biomedical Engineering) applies his science and engineering knowledge to help people with disabilities. He works directly with stroke survivors and therapists to develop new technological solutions to current rehabilitation issues.

Beth Clark (Interdisciplinary Studies) focuses on how transgender youth, their parents, caregivers, and health care providers can work together to make health care decisions that support trans youth well-being.

Stephanie Glegg (Rehabilitation Science) examines how relationships support/hinder evidence uptake in healthcare. By targeting the social influences that drive evidence use, she aims to improve patients’ timely access to healthcare innovations.

Aarthi Gobinath (Neuroscience) works on treating postpartum depression, investigating how different types of maternal antidepressant exposure affect the neurobiology of mothers and the male and female offspring in adulthood.

Celestin Hategeka (Population and Public Health) evaluates the effectiveness and implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention (ETAT+) in Rwanda to improve quality of hospital care for newborns and children.

Jaime Semchuk (Educational and Counselling Psychology) collaborates with high schools in BC to adapt, implement, and evaluate mental health literacy interventions with an aim to build capacity for promoting student wellbeing, reducing stigma, and effectively supporting students who experience mental health difficulties.

Evan Taylor (Language and Literacy Education) is a health literacy researcher and advocate whose work focuses on trans* and gender nonconforming people’s experiences of cancer and health decision-making.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bulk, L. et al. (2017). ‘We are not anything alike’: marginalization of health professionals with disabilities. Disability & Society. [Link]

Bulk, L., Glegg, S. et al. (2015). The legitimization process of students with disabilities in health and human service educational programs in Canada. Disability & Society. [Link]

Valdes, B. et al. (2016). Kinecting the moves: The kinematic potential of rehabilitation-specific gaming to inform treatment for hemiparesis. International Journal of Child Health and Human Development. [Link]

Clark, B. et al. (2017). “I would have preferred more options”: Accounting for non‐binary youth in health research. Nursing Inquiry. [Link]

Glegg, S., Livingstone, R., & Montgomery, I. (2016).Facilitating interprofessional evidence-based practice in paediatric rehabilitation: Development, implementation and evaluation of an online toolkit for health professionals. Disability and Rehabilitation. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Choleris, E., & Galea, L. A. M. (2017). Sex, hormones, and genotype interact to influence psychiatric disease, treatment, and behavioral research: Sex, hormones, and genotype in behavioral research. Journal of Neuroscience Research. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Mahmoud, R., & Galea, L. A. M. (2014). Influence of sex and stress exposure across the lifespan on endophenotypes of depression: Focus on behavior, glucocorticoids, and hippocampus. Frontiers in Neuroscience. [Link]

Hategeka, C., Mwai, L., & Tuyisenge, L. (2017).Implementing the emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care (ETAT+) clinical practice guidelines to improve quality of hospital care in rwandan district hospitals: Healthcare workers’ perspectives on relevance and challenges. [Link]

Hategeka, C., et al. (2017). Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda. Plos One. [Link]

Semchuk, J. (2016). Adolescent experiences of seeking and receiving support at school for significant mental health concerns. [Link]

Taylor, E. T. (2013). Transmen’s health care experiences: Ethical social work practice beyond the binary. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services. [Link]

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