[The following was written by Kai Geddes, currently working for the UBC Archives in the Work Learn student employee programme]

While continuing my academic career at the University of British Columbia (UBC) as a Masters in Library and Information Studies (MLIS) graduate student in September of 2019, from Vancouver Island University (VIU), I had the opportunity to attain a Work Learn position as a digitization student assistant at the UBC Archives.

Having worked as a Work Learn student at the Indigenously rich campus of VIU as a Services for Aboriginal Students Cultural Events Coordinator at the Gathering Place (Shq’apthut), and an Archival Student Assistant (the first at VIU, where I worked on the very extensive Milner Garden fonds), I was eager to start working on UBC campus.  I was not sure which position I would get hired for after I sent in a few employment applications in the middle of August of 2019. Thankfully, I received an email from UBC Archives asking me to come in for an interview in early September for the Digitization Student Assistant position. During my interview I was able to gloss over my Indigenous heritage and my work experience at VIU. Later that day, I received an email that I got hired.

As a Digitization Student Assistant, my hours were spent retrieving photographs and negatives from the UBC Archives vault, scanning them, and then by using Adobe, touching them up with the program’s digitization tools.  The most difficult to touch-up are white spots which appear because of the degradation of film negatives; there are also large wrinkles called “channels,” and discolouration due to the age of the cellulose film that was used.  All of these are problematic, but there are ways to improve the quality of the images through digitization. I also assisted with community order requests, such as photographs for magazines or television shows, digitizing cassette tapes for educational institutions, and photographs such as sports teams and those from yearbooks or magazines.

When COVID-19 led to the closure of most of its facilities and services on campus in Mid-March of 2020, including the Irving K. Barber Library where the UBC Archives is located, my duties as a Digitization Student Assistant changed along with it. However, despite this, I had a very fortunate opportunity presented to me: to look over the UBC Archives’ website and recommend, if any, changes that could be made from an Indigenous perspective. Through the lens of an Indigenous student who has taken several classes on the subject, I was in a unique position to see what might be regarded as problematic for Indigenous Peoples.

One such example is the term First Nations, which has become somewhat outdated due to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) which today recommends using Indigenous instead of terms like Indian, Aboriginal, or First Nations. However, of course, there are some exceptions to this recommendation such as Native American for those residing in the United States, and Aborigines for people who first occupied Australia and New Zealand. A rough draft of my findings was sent to the UBC Archivist for feedback and a final report will be sent in October 2020.

After taking classes and working from home over the summer, I was happy to return the UBC Archives and work with archival materials—this time as an Archival Processing Student Assistant. While I have had experience working with fonds, as mentioned above, I have not worked alone on receiving an accrued acquisition from its very beginning. Of course, I did have supervision from the University’s Archivist for my work on this accrual to the Allon Peebles fonds. The process began with sorting the materials into the previous eight categories of the existing fonds (which I extended to nine), which were provided from the work done by previous Work Learn students. After that was done, I added the materials to the finding aid which later needed to be updated with new descriptions, notes, and the number of materials added to the fonds.

At the end of August of 2021, I will be receiving my MLIS graduate degree with a First Nations Curriculum Concentration which in part is due to my Indigenous work at the UBC Archives over the summer of 2020.  My experience working at the UBC Archives has been a very positive one; unfortunately, I have heard from counselors that this is not the case for most Indigenous students in the Work Learn program. I do not know the details of exactly why their experiences have been troublesome, but I can see how fitting into a predominantly colonial educational institution may be uncomfortable for some.

Moving forward, after graduation I hope to continue my studies at UBC in the iSchool’s PhD program in September of 2021. My focus will be on Indigenous issues such as identity and what it means in Canada for those who are bi-racial (those who have one parent who is Indigenous and the other parent who is from a colonial background) – who are “living on the hyphen” (balancing both identities and not considering one to be more dominant than the other).

Kleco! Kleco! [Thank you!]

The University Archives has added a feature to our website that enhances access to our historical photograph collections.

Most of our photographs are acquired as part of a distinct fonds or collection.  As the records are arranged and described, each photograph is given a distinct catalogue number or “identifier”.  Each identifier has two parts, a collection number and an item number, separated by a forward slash.  For example, this photograph has the identifier “UBC 3.1/52”, showing that it belongs to collection UBC 3.1 (part of the Department of University Extension fonds) and is image 52 of that collection.

Our new UBC Archives Photograph Collections page lists those collections which include photographs, by collection number and title.  This allows researchers to easily limit their searches by specific collections, instead of having to compile an Open Collections “advanced search“.  For example, a researcher wanting to search for images from UBC’s Faculty of Agricultural Sciences (now Land and Food Sciences) simply clicks on collection number 24.1/.  Similarly, images acquired as part of a photo album created by UBC student Albert E. “Ab” Richards (B.A. 1923) can view them by clicking 158.1/.

Researchers can also still search the entire historical photograph database, if they wish.

Library WordPress websites will migrate from HTTP to HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure), making them faster, more findable and more secure. The migration will run from 7:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on  February 19. No service outages are expected, but it is possible that sites will not display perfectly during this time.

Affected domains:

chinesecanadian.ubc.ca

circle.ubc.ca

ikblc.ubc.ca

scholcomm.ubc.ca

recordsmanagement.ubc.ca

about.library.ubc.ca

archives.library.ubc.ca

asian.library.ubc.ca

barber.library.ubc.ca

calld-law.library.ubc.ca

cms.library.ubc.ca

collections.library.ubc.ca

digitize.library.ubc.ca

education.library.ubc.ca

gisday.library.ubc.ca

greatreads.library.ubc.ca

hawthorn.library.ubc.ca

help.library.ubc.ca

helpdesk.library.ubc.ca

koerner.library.ubc.ca

lam.library.ubc.ca

langmann.library.ubc.ca

law.library.ubc.ca

parc.library.ubc.ca

prdla.library.ubc.ca

rbsc.library.ubc.ca

researchdata.library.ubc.ca

services.library.ubc.ca

support.library.ubc.ca

sutherland.library.ubc.ca

techserv.library.ubc.ca

videomatica.library.ubc.ca

woodward.library.ubc.ca

xwi7xwa.library.ubc.ca

services.library.ubc.ca

strategicplan.library.ubc.ca

support.library.ubc.ca

sutherland.library.ubc.ca

techserv.library.ubc.ca

videomatica.library.ubc.ca

waml.library.ubc.ca

wcilcos-ch.library.ubc.ca

wcilcos.library.ubc.ca

woodward.library.ubc.ca

xwi7xwa.library.ubc.ca

Please direct problems that are noted after the migrations here.  

Library WordPress websites will migrate from HTTP to HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure), making them faster, more findable and more secure. The migration will run from 7:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on  February 19. No service outages are expected, but it is possible that sites will not display perfectly during this time.

Affected domains:

chinesecanadian.ubc.ca

circle.ubc.ca

ikblc.ubc.ca

scholcomm.ubc.ca

recordsmanagement.ubc.ca

about.library.ubc.ca

archives.library.ubc.ca

asian.library.ubc.ca

barber.library.ubc.ca

calld-law.library.ubc.ca

cms.library.ubc.ca

collections.library.ubc.ca

digitize.library.ubc.ca

education.library.ubc.ca

gisday.library.ubc.ca

greatreads.library.ubc.ca

hawthorn.library.ubc.ca

help.library.ubc.ca

helpdesk.library.ubc.ca

koerner.library.ubc.ca

lam.library.ubc.ca

langmann.library.ubc.ca

law.library.ubc.ca

parc.library.ubc.ca

prdla.library.ubc.ca

rbsc.library.ubc.ca

researchdata.library.ubc.ca

services.library.ubc.ca

support.library.ubc.ca

sutherland.library.ubc.ca

techserv.library.ubc.ca

videomatica.library.ubc.ca

woodward.library.ubc.ca

xwi7xwa.library.ubc.ca

services.library.ubc.ca

strategicplan.library.ubc.ca

support.library.ubc.ca

sutherland.library.ubc.ca

techserv.library.ubc.ca

videomatica.library.ubc.ca

waml.library.ubc.ca

wcilcos-ch.library.ubc.ca

wcilcos.library.ubc.ca

woodward.library.ubc.ca

xwi7xwa.library.ubc.ca

Please direct problems that are noted after the migrations here.  

The University of British Columbia Archives has a new website: https://archives.library.ubc.ca/!

This is a significant milestone, for several reasons.  It is the first re-design of the Archives’ website since March 2010.  Also, it coincides with the migration of the site to UBC Library’s WordPress web platform.  Finally, the updated design is now fully consistent with the Library’s Common Look and Feel (CLF) website branding.

All of our on-line historical resources – including inventories of textual records, digitized photographs and publications, virtual displays, and general historical information about the University – are still available, as are links to our access policies and procedures, records management services, and Flickr and Twitter accounts.  A standard WordPress search tool for the website is available on every page.  News and updates can be accessed on our blog, now located at https://archives.library.ubc.ca/news/.

Links to the old website should be automatically re-directed to the appropriate part of the new site.  Please let us know about any broken links or other errors.

Thanks to Yvonne Chan for technical support and advice during the re-design.

We invite you to explore the new website at https://archives.library.ubc.ca/.

The University of British Columbia Archives has a new website: http://archives.library.ubc.ca/!

This is a significant milestone, for several reasons.  It is the first re-design of the Archives’ website since March 2010.  Also, it coincides with the migration of the site to UBC Library’s WordPress web platform.  Finally, the updated design is now fully consistent with the Library’s Common Look and Feel (CLF) website branding.

All of our on-line historical resources – including inventories of textual records, digitized photographs and publications, virtual displays, and general historical information about the University – are still available, as are links to our access policies and procedures, records management services, and Flickr and Twitter accounts.  A standard WordPress search tool for the website is available on every page.  News and updates can be accessed on our blog, now located at http://archives.library.ubc.ca/news/.

Links to the old website should be automatically re-directed to the appropriate part of the new site.  Please let us know about any broken links or other errors.

Thanks to Yvonne Chan for technical support and advice during the re-design.

We invite you to explore the new website at http://archives.library.ubc.ca/.

The University Archives has launched a new on-line resource: an annotated list of First Nations-related historical resources held in the Archives.

This is an overview of resources maintained by the Archives which may be relevant to research on First Nations history and contemporary issues. It includes references to relevant materials in our various collections and links to information presented on our website. These are cited as documenting First Nations history and culture in general, and the evolution of UBC’s relationships with First Nations in particular. They include archival materials in all media (textual, photographic, audiovisual, and digital), websites, and Internet-based collections and related resources.

The focus of this compilation is on research materials held in the University Archives. Researchers are advised to consult with staff in other Library branches, such as Rare Books and Special Collections and Xwi7xwa Library, regarding materials in their collections.

This list is not intended to be fully comprehensive, but will serve as an introduction for researchers. Patrons researching specific individuals, groups, or events may find information in other collections and resources maintained by the Archives but not listed here. Archives staff are available to suggest other avenues of research and otherwise provide assistance.

Thanks to Ann Doyle and her colleagues at Xwi7xwa Library for their guidance in compiling this list.

The University Archives has launched a new on-line resource: an annotated list of First Nations-related historical resources held in the Archives.

This is an overview of resources maintained by the Archives which may be relevant to research on First Nations history and contemporary issues. It includes references to relevant materials in our various collections and links to information presented on our website. These are cited as documenting First Nations history and culture in general, and the evolution of UBC’s relationships with First Nations in particular. They include archival materials in all media (textual, photographic, audiovisual, and digital), websites, and Internet-based collections and related resources.

The focus of this compilation is on research materials held in the University Archives. Researchers are advised to consult with staff in other Library branches, such as Rare Books and Special Collections and Xwi7xwa Library, regarding materials in their collections.

This list is not intended to be fully comprehensive, but will serve as an introduction for researchers. Patrons researching specific individuals, groups, or events may find information in other collections and resources maintained by the Archives but not listed here. Archives staff are available to suggest other avenues of research and otherwise provide assistance.

Thanks to Ann Doyle and her colleagues at Xwi7xwa Library for their guidance in compiling this list.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet