October 14, 2020 – Update

Need access to print resources? So do we, even the librarians are using UBC Library’s pick-up service! To place an order you will need to know your Campus Wide Login (CWL) and then a Duo Push account (if these are new to you please click the hyperlinks), then follow these steps to place an order.

 

 

Once you’ve placed an order online you’ll receive a confirmation email with:  a request number (we recommend writing this down in case there’s an issue with your order) and the dates your order is available for pick up!

 

 

 

 

 

Remember to bring: 

  • a mask, they’re mandatory at UBC campuses
  • your student/staff/faculty ID

Location: Resource pick-up is at the Koerner Library!

Hours: Pick up available Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

 

 

 

Procedure:

  1. When you arrive at Koerner use the blue circles on the ground to line up 2 metres apart
  2. At the front door there’s a table (ring the bell if no one is there), allow the patron in front of you time to leave the table and the staff time to clean it
  3. Wait for the staff to move back, put your ID on the table, step back
  4. The staff will go get your order and place it on the table
  5. Grab your resources and you are good to go

 

 

 

    NEW   Xwi7xwa Library – Distance Research Guide

April 3, 2020 – Update

Xwi7xwa Library will be closed to the public until April 30. We are working remotely!

Email at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca or karleen.delaurier-lyle@ubc.ca for inquiries.

Information specifically about UBC Library is available in the banner on the UBC Library website, as well as here, where UBC library is updating their information.

 

March 18, 2020 – Update

As of March 20 at 5PM Xwi7xwa Library will be closed to the public until April 6 at 9AM, after which point the situation will be reviewed. Please check back here for updates about Xwi7xwa Library’s hours. For updates on hours please see.

Our staff are working remotely and still available to support research needs.

Email at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca or karleen.delaurier-lyle@ubc.ca for inquiries.

Information specifically about UBC Library is available in the banner on the UBC Library website, as well as here, where UBC library is updating their information.


Due to current closures and conditions because of Covid 19 and UBC’s decision to move classes to online, UBC library is making changes to hours, lending processes, and fine policies.

UBC.ca continues to be the most up-to-date and authoritative source of information about the University’s response to COVID-19.

Information specifically about UBC Library is available in the banner on the UBC Library website, as well as here, where UBC library is updating their information daily.

As of March 17, Xwi7xwa will be open as normal 9am-5pm. Please check back here for updates about Xwi7xwa Library’s opening hours and updates.

Many of our library staff are working from home and are available through email at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca

We are able to answer reference questions, find online materials for papers & research topics, and find alternative materials to items only available in print.

The library will cancel late fees from March 16 until the situation changes. Please do not come to campus to return or renew library materials.

Science Literacy Week Sept 21-27, 2020

Xwi7xwa Library is participating in this year’s Science Literacy Week 2020! Branches across UBC Library will be hosting online workshops, curating reading lists, and sharing fun films on this year’s topic: Biodiversity!

See the collective research guide here! And join the conversation

    

Join the conversation!
@ubclibrary #scilit20 #bc

Xwi7xwa Library has gathered some resources highlighting the work of Ronald “Bud” Sparrow. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and community during this time. Sparrow’s influence on Canada’s understanding of Aboriginal fishing will continue in others’ work. Please contact the branch with research related questions if you do not find what you are looking for below.

Musqueam Community: Learn more about Bud Sparrow and his legacy

Online Resources

Hard-copy Resources

Research Guides

Xwi7xwa Library would like to thank Bronte Burnette, our recent student librarian, for all her hard work and contributions during her time with us!

Burnette moved to Vancouver from Montana and joined our team while working on her MLIS at UBC’s iSchool. She has since graduated from the program and is the Educational Resource Developer at the Centre for Teaching and Learning!

Although she will be missed, our team looks forward to collaborating with her in her new position! Bronte has left us us with a reflection on her time with us:

As I look at my time at Xwi7xwa Library, I see that every day I learned something new: from the staff, from the patrons, from conversations, and from moments that were set aside to really make sure I understood what I was doing. The projects I was assigned or created for myself gave me a solid foundation in disseminating Indigenous knowledge in a respectful way and illustrated the importance of reciprocity, community, and place in knowledge keeping. These three components are something that I will carry into all my career in librarianship, not just in roles working with Indigenous knowledge, but all knowledge.

I understood from previous work the importance of community involvement and hearing/seeing reciprocity at work in both my FNCC classes and at Xwi7xwa, I realized it’s importance in all librarianship, but especially academic librarianship and academic relationships. I want to print it out and put it on my figurative desk as I begin my work at CTLT, so I can see it every day. Learning about the importance of place though, and the importance of land is something that I didn’t expect. And now, it’s a part of knowledge keeping that I share with patrons in each reference interview I do. Place influences all knowledge; not just Indigenous knowledge, and it’s something that I think I could only fully learn and understand after working at Xwi7xwa. I don’t think a class would have given me the same view.

My favourite projects have been the online research guides and the blog posts because it’s been a way for me to share out our collection and resources without the barrier of a reference desk or a way to the library. And I love the fact that people can access them at any time, whether or not we are open. They gave me a chance to hone my librarianship skills too in searching databases, using Boolean, understand how to use Summon, and research skills in general. The blog posts gave me a challenge to learn a lot about what is actually in the collection, how many books and the kinds of books we have. It was one of the things that was something that I thought of as a “real” librarian job: selecting and highlighting books with short descriptions.

Learning from all the staff at the library has been the absolute highlight of my MLIS. Karleen has been a cheerleader, supporter, and advocate for me in all the best possible ways: challenging me in my work, asking for my help and opinion, guiding me, answering all of my many questions. She’s been the best supervisor I could ask for. Karleen’s attitude that librarians don’t just have a duty to fill information gaps, but can educate people is another idea that I want printed out for my desk. Bronwen, as my other half of our student librarian team, has been the most supportive co-worker in coursework and sharing projects at the branch, and having her learn with me has been a way she has taught me. Tamis taught me so much about communicating with patrons in reference interviews on the desk, and on the importance of making community and work-place connections. Eleanore showed me patience and kindness, whether it was answering my many questions about cataloguing and the collection, or teaching me a small amount of her knowledge on how collections/acquisitions work, even though I wasn’t a TS student librarian. Thanks for always encouraging my “Why is this an anthology?” questions. Kayla, though we didn’t work together for long, thank you for teaching me about data sovereignty and on the beginnings of how to build a course. Every conversation I had with Sarah left me with new knowledge of how to be a better librarian, up to our last zoom meeting. In our conversations, she illustrated to me different ways of thinking about knowledge keeping, and librarianship as a whole.

These words aren’t enough, but it has been a complete privilege to work with all the library staff at Xwi7xwa and learn from and with you all. I will be bringing all these teachings and much more with me to CTLT and in my career as a librarian. Thank you for the opportunity to work at Xwi7xwa with you all. I am honoured and humbled to have worked with you all in this important work.

Sincerely,

Bronte Burnette

Starting September 15 2020, UBC Library is eliminating daily overdue fines on books, journals and audio-visual (AV) materials for all library users. Here are some other important points about the Library’s update on overdue fines:

  • Overdue fines for Course Reserve loans, Interlibrary loans and electronics will still apply when physical borrowing resumes.
  • Fines for overdue recalled items will remain in effect. Fines on a recalled item will accumulate once the item becomes overdue.
  • For overdue items that are not listed as Course Reserves and are not recalled, no overdue fines will accumulate for 28 days. Once an item is 28 days overdue, it will be deemed lost and a lost charge notice will be sent. If the item is returned, the lost charge will be dropped.

See UBC Library’s full announcement for complete information about changes to overdue fines. Please contact UBC Library Borrower Services or X̱wi7x̱wa Library Borrower Services with any questions or concerns about borrowing material or overdue fines.

Interested in learning more about library fine reduction and abolition? Check out these news articles:

Doing research about library overdue fines policies? Check out some of these selected resources to get started, but book a reference appointment for additional research help:

  • Ajayi, N. A., & Okunlola, A. A. (2005). Students’ perception of fine increases for overdue library books in an academic library. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 37(4), 187-193. doi:10.1177/0961000605057850
  • Crist, B., & DePriest, M. (2018). Removing barriers to access: Eliminating fines and fees for a win-win for your library and teens: Discover approaches to eliminating fines and fees for youth in your library. Young Adult Library Services, 17(1), 14.
  • Davies, R., & Sen, B. (2014). Overdue books at Leeds University Library. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 46(3), 226-242. doi:10.1177/0961000613486826
  • Helms, C. (2019). Eliminating overdue fines for undergraduates: A six-year review. Journal of Access Services, 16(4), 173-189. doi:10.1080/15367967.2019.1668793

What’s Going on? Indigenous Strategic Plan 2020

On Monday, September 14  Xwi7xwa’s team attended the celebration and launch of UBC’s Indigenous Strategic Plan (ISP); find out more about this virtual event here.

Reconciliation Pole 7idansuu (Edenshaw) James Hart, Haida UBC Vancouver

The following resources are for people interested in learning more about the ISP, relevant contextual information, and connections between both Vancouver/Okanagan campuses regarding the ISP:

  1. Indigenous Portal’s ISP home page:
    • For background information, timelines, FAQ related to ISP process.
  2. ISP History
    • Helpful for understanding what’s happened from 2007-2020.
  3. UBC Okanagan’s Commitments to TRC Calls to Action:
    • This is a major component of the ISP because it builds on UBCO’s Commitments to the TRC Calls to Action.
  4. Signing of UBCO’s Commitments  to TRC Calls to Action:
    • UBCO article on signing of UBCO’s commitments toward TRC.
    • Elders, chiefs and community members from throughout the Syilx Okanagan Nation joined with students, faculty and staff at UBC Okanagan to witness this event.

The ISP will cover both UBC campuses:

  • UBC-Okanagan is on the unceded, traditional, and ancestral territory of the Syilx People.
  • UBC-Vancouver is on the unceded, traditional, and anestral territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm People.
  • Each community has signed either an MOU or MOA, you can find more information here.

If you want to know more and the above resources haven’t covered it you can always contact us!

 

Recommended readings:

  1. UBC Indigenous Strategic Plan
  2. Indigenous Foundations – What is UNDRIP?
  3. Read UNDRIP here
  4. UNDRIP Research Guide
  5. MMIWG Research Guide
  6. Indian Residential School in Canada Research Guide

As we come to the end of Indigenous Peoples’ History Month, Technical Services and Xwi7xwa Library are pleased to announce a recent step undertaken in the Library’s effort to decolonize Indigenous subject headings. You may have noticed that many thousands of Xwi7xwa records previously containing the term “First Nations” now use the broader heading Aboriginal Canadians. For many years, Xwi7xwa Library’s own thesaurus has rejected the LCSH term “Indians of North America” in favour of local alternatives. As Sarah Dupont, Head of Xwi7xwa Library states, “When Aboriginal Peoples go looking to find representations of our many diverse knowledges in the Library collections, we should be able to search using terms we use to describe ourselves. We should not feel the sting of antiquated, colonial, and racist words that perpetuate negative connotations of us, especially when we and our Allies go to do the work of lifting academia and broader society out of these shadows through our scholarly efforts.” Adolfo Tarango, Head of Technical Services, adds, “While we know terminology that attempts to group Aboriginal Canadians is fraught with problems of historic, contextual, and personal challenges, new words to both represent them as a group and replace the most prevalent, problematic phrase Indians of North America were needed to signal a shift in how we think about our roles as professionals in the continued mis-treatment of ‘othered’ peoples.” Sue Andrews, Principle Cataloguer, adds, “Our choice of the new phrase, Aboriginal Canadians, has helped us to correct earlier interpretations and uses of the term “First Nations” in our records, and to instead provide a term that is more inclusive of the different groups that represent our rich heritage of First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples in Canada. By selecting a term used widely in Canadian contexts by Aboriginal Canadians themselves we uphold our principle of “cultural warrant” for our choices of terms in our FNHL thesaurus.”

We commit to being responsive to changing this term as needed, and look to our First Nations, Métis, and Inuit colleagues to advise us along this journey. Congratulations, Xwi7xwa and Technical Services!

The list of courses with Indigenous content is now available!

 

According to the 2020 University of British Columbia Course Calendar and departmental course descriptions, there are 17 courses, from 7 different departments, that have a significant amount of Indigenous content being offered for the Summer 2020 session.

To download the course list click here.

Xwi7xwa does not endorse the courses listed. Courses are added based on descriptions only. Anyone wishing to provide feedback on course content should refer to these confidential resources:

  1. Ombuds Person for Students (if you’re not satisfied with the quality of instruction in a course, the Ombuds Office will help you contact the head of the department the course is offered in)
  2. Equity & Inclusion Offices’s Conflict Engagement
  3. Aboriginal Portal’s Student Life resource page

Date, time & location: Thu, Jan 23, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Xwi7xwa Library, Seminar Room (Rm 206)

 

Details: Confused about citing references or just need a refresher? If so, then this free workshop is for you. Xwi7xwa Library is offering Citation Basics Workshop, where participants will learn the fundamentals of formatting in-text citations and references/bibliography lists in APA, MLA and Chicago styles for class assignments and papers. We’ll also cover how to cite Elders and Knowledge Keepers. You’ll get a citation resources guide at the end of the session. No previous knowledge of citing is necessary and all levels of technology skills will be happily accommodated. Please contact us at (604) 822-8738 or xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca with any questions.

 

Registration: Registration is not required, but is appreciated. Register using this link: https://forms.gle/5htTyrqJbR63KbhTA

Indigenous Archival Resources Awareness Day

When: Tuesday, January 21, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: Rare Books and Special Collections, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

Join a team of librarians, archivists, faculty, and outreach colleagues for a session to explore resources available for the research and teaching of Indigenous studies and history at UBC. Participants will learn about resources and services at the Xwi7xwa Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, and beyond, and will have a chance to get hands on with physical resources available through UBC Library. The discussion will include case studies of using the resources in teaching, ideas for using them in future research and instruction, and ethical considerations of using this material.

If you’d like to attend, please RSVP to chelsea.shriver@ubc.ca<mailto:chelsea.shriver@ubc.ca 

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