06/26/17

Growing into a face of UBC

The University of British Columbia (UBC) has two main campuses which offer similar quality of education, but different programs and environment. Every year, prospective students from all over the world find themselves able to choose if they want to join UBC, and the campus they want to spend the next few years at. In January 2016, I received information from the MasterCard Foundation leadership offering me my first shot at being part of that important decision. I had already been part of shaping the UBC student experience as part of the jumpstart program. Joining the International Student Initiative (ISI) as a student ambassador seemed like an opportunity to be involved with prospective students throughout the year as part of the University. I picked interest in the posting and in the March of 2016, I was selected to join the student ambassador team.

I had had to give tours before, as a Jumpstart orientation leader, and I had enjoyed sharing my stories about different parts of the university. Having to give tours as part of the ISI program felt like a chance to expand this experience in several ways. The tours I would give would be longer, the participants more diverse and the content more precise. Every day I would go to Brock hall would be a new chance to reflect on my experiences and meet new people.

Joining this team was a big step for me; it was my first time to take on a job during the school term. At this crucial step in my professional learning curve, I had to grow to cater to more than just my academics. Becoming a student ambassador was the perfect choice for this development because as a work-learn position under the university, there was a lot of support in successfully balancing work and classroom commitments. My colleagues and employers have been very supportive in my efforts to become better for this job, and my career. There have been a lot of opportunities for professional development through the meetings and retreats. I have learnt to express myself better, to speak in public more coherently, and be more considerate of individuals within groups. Often, I find myself inspired by the glimmer in the eyes of the participants when I deliver a tour impeccably. Furthermore, the ambassador adventures and informational sessions are creatively crafted to exhibit UBC as the dynamic place it is. Because of this, I am aware of what happens around me at UBC, why it happens, and what it means to the people who call the university home. Certainly, it has given this university a lot more meaning to me. In as much as the program is highly professional, some of the people I work with have grown to become my friends. Whether it is through covering my shifts when I could not make them or having personal conversations outside work, my colleagues have made this team feel like my community. As I move into my fourth and final year, I am excited to keep growing as an ambassador.

06/11/17

The presidential pit stop 2017

BREAKFAST WITH THE PRESIDENT 2.0

With Dr. Santa Ono (center back), the student ambassador team and one of the award winners (center front).

This year, I was selected to attend the annual leadership recognition event at the Robert H. Lee alumni center. Much like last year, I found myself surrounded by a remarkable congregation of outstanding UBC students. However, my involvements since then have drastically changed. My on-campus involvements have shifted from student society (Science Undergraduate Society) and orientations (Jumpstart), to representing UBC as a student ambassador. Akin to my role of representing student clubs as part of the Science Undergraduate Society (SUS) clubs commission, my work as a student ambassador with the International Student Initiative proffers an opportunity to represent the university to prospective students. In a way, the nature of my involvements has not changed much but only evolved in form. And regardless of this nature, it has all been driven by my enthusiasm to serve a community that has been fundamental to my personal development. It is this enthusiasm that Dr. Santa Ono, the UBC president and host of the event, encouraged in student leaders that day. This encouragement culminated with the conferring of a special book Injustice to all attendees. This was a token to complement the noble motivations behind the contributions for which we were being recognized. Outstanding students, one of whom was a fellow student ambassador, were also conferred special awards for their achievements.

This event was my second invitation to a breakfast hosted by the UBC president in the 2016/2017 academic year. Although it did not offer as much opportunity for direct dialogue Dr. Santa Ono, there was more to take from the larger group of student leaders. This day was an opportunity to enjoy overdue conversations with over-achievers from all over campus in the company of scrumptious finger-food and live music

08/23/16

A tale of two commissioners

My first contribution in the faculty of science started with a momentous email in the June of 2015. This is when I was chosen by the Vice president Administration as one of two Science Undergraduate Society (SUS) clubs commissioners for the 2015-2016 academic year. To me, growing my UBC experience was strongly supplemented by growing within my faculty and this was an opportunity to grow at the pace that would support me without overwhelming my capabilities. The clubs commissioner role gave me unique opportunities to build my personal network and also support cooperation. As a clubs commissioner, I was supposed to ensure that science clubs got access to resources offered by the Science Undergraduate Society, and collaborations between the clubs were supported.

2015 Clubs orientation.

In August 2015, I co-organized the 2015 clubs orientation. This was meant to introduce the club presidents to the Clubs commission, inform them about resources through the Science Undergraduate Society, and instigate relationships between the clubs. With the reliable support of the VP administration and the co-clubs commissioner, the 2015 clubs orientation remains high up in my personal list of achievements in event organization.

The retreat.

In the spirit of team building, the Science Undergraduate Society organizes an annual retreat for all councillors, executives and associate executives. This year, I was lucky to join the SUS retreat to Hope BC. In addition to a change of pace, this weekend was a great opportunity to meet all the SUS student leaders and learn skills relevant to leadership within the SUS. Minor, yet entirely new to me was the nature of the meeting system of the SUS and AMS councils. It still impresses me as an effective way to conduct meetings involving large numbers of people quickly and efficiently. To me, the SUS retreat remains as one of the displays of UBC’s investment into building team cohesion and increasing capacity.

Science Students Appreciation Dinner.
With Ho Yi (left), the second clubs commissioner.

With Ho Yi (left), my fellow clubs commissioner.

Each academic year, the clubs commission organizes the end of year club presidents’ dinner to celebrate a year of achievement and collaboration. This year (2016) however, the clubs commission, with the support of other SUS executives, organized the Science Students Appreciation dinner. The first of its kind, the appreciation dinner was an expansion from the clubs dinner. This was intended to expand recognition from clubs exclusively to science all science students. Students were recognized for outstanding leadership, club activities and a vote was allowed for the “people’s choice” club – which the Undergraduate Research Opportunities (URO) scooped.

In addition to being a great opportunity to share scrumptious Greek food while listening to live music, this was my first opportunity to co-MC to a large group.

Indeed, being part of the Science Undergraduate Society as a clubs commissioner has been instrumental in my leadership journey and I look forward to getting involved within the faculty of science again in the future.

05/25/16

Jumpstart 2015: The vantage point

Vantage point.

I am often asked about my favourite experience at UBC; by now I have figured that it is no coincidence that my mind flashes back to the August in the summer of 2015. Not only do I remember it as a very rejuvenating experience, I recall it to be high up on my list of the most “efficient” periods of my UBC life. August is the time when the first groups of new students arrive at UBC through the jumpstart orientations program. Having failed to make it in time for my own jumpstart in my first year, I was strongly motivated to support other new international students in ways that I was not lucky enough to experience. This is an opportunity that was proffered to me when I was chosen to be an orientations leader (O.L) for the 2015 Jumpstart orientations program.

Kitsilano

With my learning community at Kitsilano.

My roles were centered on co-facilitating orientation for new international students through academic, social and holistic immersion programs. Under the supervision of senior Jumpstart staff, I was part of a closely knit team of over fifty orientations leaders in Totem Park (and over 100 in all residences). My experiences could have easily been limited to the (“job”) roles described above – not to say that they were not cardinal – but there were so many unforeseen pieces of being an orientation leader. There was something exhilarating about being in a position to contribute to the lives of other students here at UBC. I always knew I wanted to find a vantage point to be a positive part of other people’s stories and the jumpstart program turned out to be perfect for this. The connections that I made with the faculty fellows and first year students within my learning community also supported me to grow in leadership and interpersonal relations. Despite following a model for professional relationships, some of these students have turned out to be friends that I have kept in touch with even beyond the two week period.

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-With Cindy Shan, my partner O.L.

Closer to my heart however were the experiences I had with other orientation leaders. Having spent a slightly longer time training and meeting daily with this highly motivated group of individuals, I developed very supportive social and professional relationships with many of my colleagues. Since Jumpstart was my first involvement in student development, I was conscious of the fact that I would need support along the way. The sense of community that the team cultivated transcended the support I expected and augmented the energy and impact that I had during the program (and that the program had on me). In many ways, I stepped out of my comfort zone and I still recognize this as a turning point in several aspects of my character and ways of relating to other people. The program required a lot of time and energy, yet also gave a lot of exuberance in return so it was possible to keep

squad

With my O.L squad.

going on from early mornings to late nights. This was to lead to the “Jumpstart hangover” after the three weeks but it was worth every bit of the effort that was put into it. In this same spirit, I developed a good partnership with my Learning community partner (orientation leader) and together we took a step beyond our assigned times to ensure that our learning community created bonds that would last beyond. To this day, I am glad to see students from my learning community that keep in touch and support each other even beyond their first year. It is this “seed” of cohesion that drew me into this role of building community – and spawns the feelings of accomplishment that I attach to my experiences.

 

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With learning community at Beaty Biodiversity museum

My August experience was perhaps a salient personal reflection of efficiency because I was involved in a few other capacities around campus. In this spate of progress, I was accepted into my first role in research at the Chan Yeung Center for Occupational and Environmental respiratory Disease, and also co-organized the 2015 clubs orientation for the Science Undergraduate Society (as the 2015-2016 Clubs Commissioner). I would like to think that I was fairly successful in all the capacities I was involved in at the time. Being part of a warm community in Jumpstart, a driven collaborative network in the Science Undergraduate Society and fundamental scientific (clinical) research merges into one salient memory that has been irrevocably etched in my mind.

I have taken the few past months to reflect on these fast-paced but momentous three weeks of my life. As much I recognize many things that I could have done better (and/or that the program could have done better), I believe these were an amazingly well put 3 weeks that epitomize the highlights of my life at UBC.

 

 

04/6/16

Breakfast with the president

Today April 4th…

Today is an amazing day, a day of gratitude and reflection. Today, I stop for a moment to take a look at the road unwound behind me. Two years ago, I joined this amazing university as a first year student. I was introduced to the concept of constant engagement in leadership by the MasterCard Foundation leadership development activities. Then, I could neither see how to start my journey of leadership, nor how to transcend my previous personal capabilities in this foreign system.

With the MCF team at Sage Bistro

With the MCF team at Sage Bistro

Today, I stand among a group of leaders recognized by the President and Vice chancellor of UBC, Martha Piper. Nominated to attend by Jolanta Lekich and Yuko Lee (a science international student advisor), I am greeted with a sumptuous breakfast at Sage Bistro and an important message of encouragement from reputable UBC staff. In a way, this is the kind of revitalization I need occasionally on this journey. It has been easy to lose track of the impact I have had in my communities, right from my first involvement in my house council in Kwakiutl house down to the Science Undergraduate Society where I have been a clubs commissioner for the past academic year.  These are simply the bounds (chronologically) of the examples of roles I have taken on. In this moment of reflection, I realize that contrary to my pre-current beliefs, leadership has become an integral part of my life and ceased to be a set of tasks that I am must do.

 

 

Today, I am not short of things to be grateful for. I am grateful to God, for the cascade of opportunities that unravel ceaselessly. I am grateful to the MasterCard foundation scholarship, to UBC, and more specifically, to the people who stand behind these reputable organizations. There have been people who have believed in me along the way. The people who have nominated me, the people I have worked with and the people who have supported me in my duties. Tomorrow, I look forward to being here again as a student ambassador with campus tours. As I take home a written form of inspiration signed by Martha Piper, I pause at the door of Sage Bistro and glance back. I am not one to pass an opportunity to be grateful for good food.

05/11/15

Kwakiutl house council : Starting out close to home.

Date : September 2014 – April 2015

On my first night at the University of British Columbia, I had a momentous meeting with my floor residence adviser, a moment that would change my entire experience as a member of this community. It was the night I was inspired to join the Kwakiutl house council!

In my first week, I applied and was elected as a floor representative for Kwakiutl floor 5; a position i held for my entire first year. Being a member of a house council under the Totem Park Residents Association (TPRA), I actively participated in planning, advertising and organizing of house-wide events, and sometimes, Totem Park-wide events. in addition, I was to convey information and feedback between the residents of Kwakiutl house and the TPRA.

Much as being a new member with minimal orientation posed a lingering challenge for me as a leader in residence, the Kwakitutl house members were a very supportive community. This inspired me to work hard and effectively so that I could in turn, make their experience in first-year residence worth while. It goes with out saying that this experience had several minor but significant successes : winning the Totem Park colour wars, successfully holding house-wide events, and being runners up for the Totem Park residence cup.

Winning Totem Park Colour wars with Kwakiutl house

Winning Totem Park Colour wars with Kwakiutl house

Having not had extensive experience in community leadership before, I was surprised by how much being a leader in such an exuberant community could improve my own personal motivation to take on previously unfamiliar tasks. I realized that I did not have to have to be a very vocal icon in order to have a positive impact in my community. I learnt that leadership was more about being engaged with in the community, than trying to coordinate activities from a distance – that being a leader who was immersed with his members, so much that the role ceased to have a significant tag, and instead worked in unison with the interests of every one was far more rewarding.

Needless to say, this experience was especially socially rewarding. Being part of events meant that I had to interact with members of my community more often than I would have ordinarily. Though my interactions might have initially been regarding my responsibilities, many of the people I interacted with became friends that would hold further significance in the rest of my life here at UBC.

The Kwakiutl house council at the winter formal event.

The Kwakiutl house council 2014- 2015 at the winter formal event.

Put succinctly; I acquired skills in events organizations, community development, interpersonal relations and networking. These are skills that should enable me take on roles in the community, advertise, advocate, etc more effectively. I feel better poised to take up leadership in the community, residence, orientations and clubs – all of which are part of my future goals.

It was a life-changing realization that leadership and service tend to add more value to an individual, than what they take away in terms of time-commitments or challenges. Thumbs up to an experience I will hold dearly for the rest of my life.

Members of Kwakiutl house, fifth floor: end of year.

Members of Kwakiutl house, fifth floor: end of year.