Author Archives: Mona Gleason

Past and Present: Advocating for Rural Education

In my ongoing SSHRCC project regarding the history of parental advocacy for children’s schooling in rural parts of BC, issues of methods and methodologies have become paramount. In the project, we are comparing two data sets: one historical and one … Continue reading

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Pleased to announce two awards…..

I am so delighted to be the 2018 recipient of two awards from affiliated committees of the Canadian Historical Association (CHA).  As a former postdoctoral student of the late Dr. Neil Sutherland, a trailblazer in the history of children and … Continue reading

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New SSHRCC Insight Grant – “Talking Back to Victoria: Parental Advocacy for Rural Education in British Columbia, 1920 to the Present”

My new research project, which returns to the archival records of the Elementary Correspondence School in British Columbia’s early twentieth century, has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC).  The project will fund graduate … Continue reading

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Two New Publications – Embodiment in Education and Families without Schools

I’ve published two new articles of note recently. The first is the Keynote Address that I gave last year (2017) at the International Standing Conference on the History of Education (ISCHE)  in Chicago.  Entitled “Metaphor, materiality, and method: the central … Continue reading

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Oxford Bibliographies in Childhood Studies article “History of Childhood in Canada” has just gone live!

Authored with my colleague, Tamara Myers, our Oxford Bibliography entry for the history of children in the Canadian context is available at http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com. We are delighted to contribute to this important resource in the field and to be able to highlight … Continue reading

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The Problem(s) with Adult Constructions of Children’s Vulnerability – Lessons for the History of Sexuality and Sexual Health

I’ve published a new article in the March 2017 issue of the Canadian Historical Review  (http://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/chr.3564) that employs the concept of “social age” to interrogate adult constructions of children’s vulnerability, particular in the realm of sexuality and sexual health. Historically, … Continue reading

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Bringing Children and Youth into Canadian History – New Book Published!

I am happy to announce that Bringing Children and Youth in Canadian History: The Difference Kids Make (Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2017) has just been published. Co-edited with my colleague Tamara Myers, the book is a collection of readings particularly … Continue reading

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Keynote Address at the 38th International Standing Committee on the History of Education, Chicago, August 17 – 20th, 2016

Next week, I travel to Chicago to join my history of education colleagues around the world at the 38th ISCHE conference. This marks a unique opportunity for historians of education from around the world to come together to present their … Continue reading

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Forthcoming Article: “Avoiding the Agency Trap…..”

My latest article entitled  “Avoiding the Agency Trap: Caveats for Historians of Children, Youth, and Education,” will appear in a special issue of History of Education in the next few months. The issue focuses “Marginalized Children and Vulnerable Histories” and … Continue reading

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Spencer Foundation Grant and New Research Project

I’m delighted to be a recipient of a Spencer Foundation Grant for my latest research project entitled Families without Schools: Rurality and the Promise of Schooling in Western Canada, 1920s to 1960s. The project re-visits the family letters of the … Continue reading

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