Category Archives: Social Change

Present and Past of Mongolia: 15 Years of Changes as Observed by a Civil Engineer

By Kenji Maruoka Translated from Japanese by Ts Jangar Originally published as 「谷川, 聡. (Tanigawa Satoru).(2017). モンゴルの今と昔~2000 年から土木技術者として見てきた15 年の変遷~. KON BAINA UU. No16 It was my first visit of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, where I came to work for Japan’s ODA program in the early May … Continue reading

Posted in Bilateral Aid, Change, Development, Infrastructure, Social Change, Ulaanbaatar | Leave a comment

Cars in Mongolia

By Julian Dierkes Our image of Mongolia may be dominated by horses as a part of the landscape, but also as a mode of transport. But, of course, motorized transport is very common place today. Development Stages and Motorization I … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Change, Countryside, Curios, Development, Social Change, Social Issues, Ulaanbaatar | Tagged | Leave a comment

New to Ulaanbaatar June 2017

By Julian Dierkes I’ve been keeping a list of things that are arriving to/disappearing from central Ulaanbaatar: May 2016 | December 2015 | May 2015 | May 2014 | October 2013. More informal versions of these observations also appear in … Continue reading

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My Biggest Question about the Election

By Julian Dierkes Of course, it is interesting to speculate about the likelihood of one candidate or another winning the election. On that front, a week into the campaign, an Enkhbold victory still seems more likely, though a second round … Continue reading

Posted in Corruption, Democracy, Party Politics, Politics, Populism, Presidential 2017, Protest, Social Change, Social Issues, Social Movements | Tagged | Leave a comment

Guest Post: Negative Income Tax I – Redistribution in Expanding Economies

By Ulrich Andree Note: This is the first of three articles. For the extended original article see LinkedIn. The forthcoming posts will focus on (dis)advantages of a negative income tax, and on the implementation of a negative income tax in … Continue reading

Posted in Demography, Development, Economics, Policy, Public Policy, Public Service, Social Change, Social Issues, Taxes, Ullrich Andree | Leave a comment

Guest Post: Negative Income Tax II – Advantages and Disadvantages

By Ulrich Andree Note: This is the second of three articles. For the extended original article see LinkedIn. The previous post focused on redistribution and the concept of an NIT. The final article will focus on the implementation of an NIT … Continue reading

Posted in Demography, Development, Economics, Health, Inequality, Policy, Public Policy, Public Service, Social Change, Social Issues, Taxes, Ullrich Andree | Leave a comment

New to Ulaanbaatar in May 2016

By Julian Dierkes I’ve been keeping a list of things that are arriving to/disappearing from central Ulaanbaatar: December 2015 |  May 2015 | May 2014 | October 2013. I’ve copied the 2014 and 2015 lists here and am adding to it. New items … Continue reading

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How popular is Russian in Mongolia 26 Years After the Fall of the Soviet Union?

By Bulgan B The May 9th Victory Day has revived the Mongolian love for Russia once again. Mongolians were watching the Victory Day parade and Mongolian social media was trending on any story which relates to the Great Victory. Wreaths … Continue reading

Posted in Bulgan Batdorj, Education, Foreign Policy, Kazakhs, Nationalism, Russia, Social Change, Society and Culture | Tagged | Leave a comment

New to Ulaanbaatar in late 2015

I’ve been keeping a list of things that are arriving to/disappearing from central Ulaanbaatar: May 2015 | May 2014 | October 2013. I’ve copied the 2014 and 2015 lists here and am adding to it. New items since previous posts appear in italics. What has … Continue reading

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FOC Comes to Mongolia

Thanks to support from the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, I was able to participate in the Freedom Online Coalition conference in Ulaanbaatar. Below, I want to highlight some of the discussions and presentations that were of particular relevance … Continue reading

Posted in International Relations, Media and Press, Mongolia and ..., Protest, Social Change, Social Issues, Social Media | Tagged | 2 Comments

Initial Observations in Ulaanbaatar, Again

By Julian Dierkes On previous visits to Mongolia, I’ve taken notes on my initial quick observations about changes (and the lack thereof) in the Ulaanbaatar cityscape: November 2014 | May 2014 | November 2013. So, here it goes for May 2015. … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Social Change, Ulaanbaatar | Tagged | 6 Comments

Mongolia in the 2014 Social Progress Index

[This post was written jointly by Undral Amarsaikhan and Julian Dierkes] On April 2, the Social Progressive Imperative released its 2014 Social Progress Index. For the first time, this included Mongolia. The Social Progressive Index is an index of indices … Continue reading

Posted in Air Polution, Corruption, Development, Economics, Education, Governance, Nomadism, Policy, Policy, Primary and Secondary Education, Research on Mongolia, Social Change, Undral Amarsaikhan, Water | Tagged | 1 Comment

Visible Manifestations of Social Change in Ulaanbaatar

By Julian Dierkes It seems to me that social change has accelerated in Mongolia, or at least in Ulaanbaatar, or at least in central Ulaanbaatar in the past two years. I’ve had the food fortune to have visited Mongolia three … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Curios, Social Change, Ulaanbaatar | Tagged | 2 Comments

ACMS Scholar’s Corner Sept 19 2013

Last night I was very pleased to join the American Center for Mongolian Studies “Scholar’s Corner” at the Blue Sky Hotel. The events are intended as an informal way for scholars and others interested in research on Mongolia to gather … Continue reading

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