Category Archives: communicating science

What’s your (first) line?

A friend of mine is near the end of his Ph.D. He’s at the stage where he just wants to get the damn thing done. I asked if he’d written the opening line yet and he said no, he doesn’t … Continue reading

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Time zones are much older than you think

Skype, facetime and a growing collection of virtual meeting tools like Blackboard Collaborate are making communication easier, cheaper and “almost like being there” with family, friends and colleagues around the World. Scheduling these conversations makes us acutely aware of the … Continue reading

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What does open communication mean to you?

I’m struggling with an issue. I can’t decide, or maybe I’m afraid to admit, if I’m being naive. Or perhaps so inexperienced, I’m blinded by imposter syndrome, the feeling that you really don’t belong in the group of experts you … Continue reading

Posted in astro 101, communicating science, physics, research, social media, teaching | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

One Earth, one sky: the power of Twitter

This post was inspired by the beauty of the night sky and the interactions that followed down here on Earth. A couple of nights ago, Venus, the Evening Star, hung a few degrees below a spectacular, 3-day old crescent Moon. … Continue reading

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The astronomy of Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year occurs on January 23 this year. The fact that we even have to announce the date reveals that it changes each year. That’s because the date for Chinese or Lunar New Year depends on how the annual … Continue reading

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