Category Archives: research

A Tale of Two Comets: Evidence-Based Teaching in Action

We often hear about “evidence-based teaching and learning.” In fact, it’s a pillar of the approach to course development and transformation that we follow in the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative. It’s a daunting phrase, though, “evidence-based teaching and learning.” … Continue reading

Posted in astro 101, peer instruction, research, teaching | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Situated Learning

[I wrote this review of situated learning, also known as situated cognition, in 2009 for the internal communications discussion board we use in the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative. I go back to it often enough, mostly to find the … Continue reading

Posted in research, teaching | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Self-enhancement and imposter syndrome: neither is good for your teaching

I read a terrific paper this week by Jennifer McCrickerd (Drake University) called, “Understanding and Reducing Faculty Reluctance to Improve Teaching.” In it, the author lists 6 reasons why some post-secondary (#highered) instructors are not interested in improving the way … Continue reading

Posted in professional develpment, research, teaching | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

What’s your (first) line?

A friend of mine is near the end of his Ph.D. He’s at the stage where he just wants to get the damn thing done. I asked if he’d written the opening line yet and he said no, he doesn’t … Continue reading

Posted in communicating science, research | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

What does open communication mean to you?

I’m struggling with an issue. I can’t decide, or maybe I’m afraid to admit, if I’m being naive. Or perhaps so inexperienced, I’m blinded by imposter syndrome, the feeling that you really don’t belong in the group of experts you … Continue reading

Posted in astro 101, communicating science, physics, research, social media, teaching | Tagged , , | 10 Comments