11/26/18

Class #10 – Sustainability, Community, and Social Studies Curriculum

Post your response to Class #9 reading to this blog (click on “Leave a Comment” link below).

Class #10 – Sustainability, Community, and Social Studies Curriculum / Inquiry & Reflection

 Reading:

Houser, N. O. (2014). Ecological democracy: An environmental approach to citizenship education. In E. W. Ross (Ed.). The social studies curriculum: Purposes, problems, and possibilities (4th Ed., pp. 139-160). Albany: State University of New York Press. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/CJtiic

Martusewicz, R., & Schnakenberg, G. (2010). Eco-justice, community-based learning and social studies education. In A. P. DeLeon & E. W. Ross (Eds.), Critical theories, radical pedagogies and social education (pp. 25-41). Rotterdam: Sense. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/1IaP0X

Au, W. (2010). Critical reflection in the classroom: Consciousness, praxis, and relative autonomy in social studies. In A.P. DeLeon & E. W. Ross (Eds.), Critical theories, radical pedagogies and social education (pp. 163-181). Rotterdam: Sense. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/1IaP0X

 

Optional reading:

The New Teacher Book, Chapter 5 “Making change in the world beyond the classroom”
Family; Community; and Ecocide sections of Stay Solid! (Hern et al.)

Assignment due:

  • Response to readings on course blog
  • FINAL DRAFT OF PEDAGOGICAL CREED
11/2/18

Class #9 Social Class and Social Studies (Part 2)

Post your response to Class #9 reading to this blog (click on “Leave a Comment” link below).

Class #9 – Social Class and the Social Studies Curriculum (Part 2)

Reading:

Orlowski, P. (2008). Social class: How political ideology has made it the forgotten identity marker in British Columbia social studies curriculum. New Proposals1(2), 29-47. Retrieved from http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/newproposals/article/view/118

In Class Activity / Discussion: Starpower

Optional reading:

Class & Class Struggle; Money, Work, & Success; Skills sections of Stay Solid! (Hern et al.)

Assignment due:

  • Response to workshop readings on course blog
11/1/18

Wealth Inequality – Lessons & Resources

Lesson plans

Ten Chairs of Inequality [PDF]

Organic Goodie Simulation [PDF]

2013 EDCP 333 student group, lesson plans and resources on social class

2012 EDCP 333 student group, lesson plans and resources on social class

2011 EDCP 333 student group, lesson plans and resources on social class

2010 EDCP 333 student group, lesson plans and resources on social class

Resources

Wealth Inequality in Canada,  Broadbent Institute (Video), 2014

The Wealth Gap: Perceptions and Misconceptions in Canada, Broadbent Institute (Report, PDF), 2014

Born to Win: Wealth Concentration in Canada Since 1999, CCPA [PDF], 2018

Inequality.org

An Economy for the 99%, Oxfam [PDF], 2017

Global Wealth Report, Credit Suisse Research, 2018 [PDF] includes World Wealth Pyramid

10/26/18

Class #8 – Social Class and the Social Studies Curriculum (Part 1)

Post your response to Class #8 reading to this blog (click on “Leave a Comment” link below).

Class #8 – Social Class and the Social Studies Curriculum (Part 1)

Reading:

Queen, G. (2014). Class struggle in the classroom. In E. W. Ross (Ed.). The social studies curriculum: Purposes, problems, and possibilities (4th Ed., pp. 313-334). Albany: State University of New York Press. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/CJtiic

Ross, E. W. (2018). Class. In D. G. Krutka, A. M. Whitlock, & M. Helmsing (Eds.), Keywords in the social studies: Concepts and conversations (pp. 249-260). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing. 

Optional reading:

“What we talk about when we talk about class” by Michael Schwalbe

Anyon, J. (1981). Social class and school knowledge. Curriculum Inquiry, 11(1), 3-41. Retrieved from http://www.appstate.edu/~jacksonay/rcoe/anyon.pdf

The New Teacher Book, Chapter 4, “Discipline: Rescuing the remains of the day when class doesn’t go as planned.”

 Assignment due:

  • Response to readings on course blog

 

10/25/18

SOGI 123: 10/11/12 SOCIAL STUDIES, BC FIRST PEOPLES & INDIGENOUS STUDIES First People’s Perspectives on Gender

Review the lessons plan for secondary social studies on First People’s Perspectives on Gender found on the SOGI 123 site. (See below of download from link.)

First People’s Perspectives on Gender

Curriculum Connections

SS 10 – Curricular Competencies

  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups during this period (continuity and change)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)

BC First Peoples 11 & Contemporary Indigenous Studies 12- Curricular Competencies

  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups in different time periods and places (continuity and change)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)

Rationale

In this lesson, students will explore Indigenous perspectives of gender, and contrast these to European beliefs. Students will also consider the impact of these Non-Indigenous ideas about gender on Indigenous people and communities both at the time of colonization and today.

Further resources can be found at http://guides.vpl.ca/c.php?g=698666&p=4959846

Lesson Plan

  1. Have students read the article, Two Spirit: Past, Present & Future by Harlan Pruden (page 6) – http://pridenet.ca/wp-content/uploads/the-gender-spectrum.pdf
  2. Have students complete the First Nations’ Perspectives of Gender worksheet (page 56) – http://pridenet.ca/wp-content/uploads/the-gender-spectrum.pdf
  3. Discuss the student’s responses as a class.
  4. (Optional) Depending on the previous learning that has occured, have a conversation about colonization and the effect that residential schools has had on the First People’s culture / identity. (This predisposes that students have already had a chance to learn about colonization and residential schools in depth.)
  5. Through the National Film Board, watch the movie – Second Stories: Deb-we-win ge-ken-am-aan
    1. Can be found by clicking on the following link https://www.nfb.ca/film/second_stories_-our_place_in_the_circle/
  6. Discuss the film with some optional guiding questions:
    1. What was the message of the film?
    2. What were some challenges that the individuals experienced?
      1. Can you relate that to challenges that many LGBTQ people face?
    3. What challenges were specific to 2-Spirit people?
    4. How can we help to change the narrative into the positive? (This can be connected to the Truth and Reconciliation Report).

Indicate to the students that every nation has a different word for 2-Spirit in their own language, if the term survived past residential schools. Some nations have created new terms, if it did not. Further to that, no two nations will have the same definition of what it means to be 2-Spirit and will attribute different roles depending on the context that they place within that nation.

Some stories are considered sacred and used only for ceremony, or in certain situations and sometimes only with certain families or people. It is important that you have permission from an elder or knowledge keeper when sharing stories.


Other resources to check out: