Author Archives: Christina Hendricks

Welcome to week 4!

This is our last official week of Teaching with WordPress (though see the end of this post–we don’t think of the course as fully “ending”). It’s been a quick four weeks!

Week 4 activities

If you haven’t done so already, please take a look at the learning activities for weeks 3 and 4, including the activity support notes on the same page, and consider doing one or two of these this week. Or, write a blog post about anything that is on your mind at the moment related to teaching with WordPress.

Two things we would really love to see, if you have the time and inclination:

  1. Please contribute to our Assignment Bank! This is a collection of assignments you might give to students (or have already given) that use WordPress in some way. We’re hoping to build up a bank of numerous kinds of assignments that can serve as inspiration for anyone coming to the TWP site this week or later.
  2. Please consider sharing your “Word in Progress,” something you’re working on for which you’d like feedback. You can of course just do that through the blog hub (which some are already doing), or you can contribute to the WIP section of the site, here.

We also invite you to tweet a question to #TWP15, something you’d like to hear others’ views about. Tweet using #quest and #TWP15.

If you feel so inclined, you could make a video or screen cast talking about how and why you use WordPress for teaching and learning, as two of our participants have done:  Jim Luke: http://econproph.com/2015/06/18/finding-my-voice-my-teaching-with-wp-journey/ and John Johnston: http://johnjohnston.info/blog/blogging-bootcamp-video-review/

TWP15 Wrap-up event

We will also have a final synchronous meeting this week, during which we’ll ask you to share what you’ve been working on, ask for feedback, learn what others are doing, etc. It is scheduled for Friday, June 26, 12pm Pacific/3pm Eastern/19:00 UTC. It will be on Google Hangouts, and broadcast live on YouTube for those who just want to watch but not be in the hangout. It will also be recorded. Please see here for more information and to RSVP.

Not the end…

Though this is our last week of the “course” called Teaching with WordPress, we don’t think of this as the end–part of our idea with this course was to connect people who are using WordPress in teaching and learning so that we can continue to learn from each other. So though this is our last “official” week, we hope you will continue to connect with others from the course, add resources to the resource collection, and add assignments to the assignment bank. We hope the TWP site will continue to be a resource for many who are interested in teaching with WordPress, and we’d love it if you could add things to it now and then!

Wrapping videos with activities

Trolley image from Pixabay (public domain)Please see here for the page on which the following is located, which also has the videos!: http://blogs.ubc.ca/phil102/weekly-schedule/week-5/

There are three video lectures on the trolley problem and on Judith Jarvis Thomson’s article called “The Trolley Problem.” You will need to watch them before class on Tuesday, June 9, and do a couple of activities about them.

Before watching these videos, please participate in these two polls (optional; this doesn’t keep track of who has done so or not, but it could be interesting to see the results!)

Do you think it’s permissible for the bystander to flip the switch and move the trolley onto the track with one person instead of five?

Yes
No

Do you think it’s morally permissible for the bystander to push the large person onto the tracks, thereby killing one instead of five?

Yes
No

Online discussions related to the videos:

You need to add your thoughts to at least one of the following discussions on this site. You don’t need to be logged in, but you will have to give a name and email address (the email address is not shown publicly!). If you want to remain anonymous, you can either just give your initials or use a fake name and tell me what your fake name is via email so I know you participated in the discussion.

Your contributions to the discussion can either be new comments or substantive replies to someone else’s comment (not just something like “yeah, I agree”…that doesn’t say much).

Please contribute to either one or both of these discussion questions (click on the titles of each to get to the page to make your comments):

1. Difference between the trolley driver & transplant cases

After watching the video by Christina on Philippa Foot’s trolley driver and transplant cases, please comment on the following:

Do you think the way she explains why the trolley driver may turn the trolley but the surgeon may not transplant the patient’s organs, through negative and positive duties, makes sense? If not, do you think there is some other way to explain the difference between those two cases, that could show why the trolley driver can turn the trolley but the surgeon cannot operate? Of course, if you don’t agree that the trolley driver can turn the trolley, you can also say that too, and why, if you wish (not required!).

Add your thoughts through the comments at the bottom of the page. You can also reply to others’ comments. If you want to get an email notification if someone replied to your comment please check the box in the comment area saying so.

2. Difference between bystander at the switch and the large person

After watching the videos by Christina about Thomson’s trolley examples (the second and third videos by her), including “bystander at the switch” and the one Thomson calls “fat man,” please comment on the following:

Do you think the way that Thomson distinguishes why the bystander may flip the switch to turn the trolley, but may not push a large person onto the tracks, makes sense? If not, do you think there is some other way to explain why it’s okay to kill one person in the switching the trolley track case but not in the pushing the large person case? Of course, if you don’t agree that the bystander can flip the switch and turn the trolley to kill one person, you could also say that and explain why (not required!).

Please add your thoughts by using the comment box, below. You can also reply to others’ comments. If you want to get an email notification if someone replied to your comment please check the box in the comment area saying so.