Courses

The Technology Studies Education graduate program offers a common core of courses and a range of electives. The master’s program has a core selected from the following courses:

  • Review of Research in Technology Studies
    • Cognition, Emotion and Technology
    • Learning Technologies, Media Studies, New Media and the Learning Sciences
    • Latour and Science & Technology Studies
  • Articulation(s) of Digital Literacies through Ecological Studies
  • History, Philosophy & Theory of ICTs and New Media in Education
  • Seminar in the Teaching of ICT
  • Curriculum Issues
  • Introduction to Educational Research

Elective courses include:

  • Foundations of Educational Technology
  • Critical Issues of Education, Learning and ICT
  • Integrating Educational Technologies Within Teacher Education
  • Cultural and New Media Studies
  • Latour & STS
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Video Ethnography
  • Doctoral Seminars
  • Opportunities for Online and Individualized Study

Technology Studies graduate Education Course Descriptions (Selected 1996-Present)

Please also see the ETEC 511 & 531 + EDCP 481 & 571 blog.

SEMINAR ON BRUNO LATOUR & STS (2013)
This seminar focuses on recent work of Bruno Latour, arguably the most creative and challenging scholar of Science & Technology Studies (STS).  Latour’s reputation and scholarship traverses an extremely wide range of disciplines in addition to STS (e.g., anthropology, art, education, environmental studies, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, sociology, theology, etc.).  Following a survey of Latour’s work and the postsecular turn in STS, we will focus on three new texts: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence (2013), Rejoicing or the Torments of Religious Speech (2013), and On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods (2010). The seminar is interdisciplinary and inviting, and students from any and all disciplines are encouraged to enroll.  We will work systematically through these texts to closely examine Latour’s strategies for doing STS.

Cultural and New Media Studies (2013)
This course focuses on understanding media and associated freedoms of cultural expression and the press for learning, teaching, and public pedagogy.  Media studies is a dynamic discipline tailored to exploring youth, culture, and education through concepts or techniques such as articulation, framing, regulation, remediation, representation, and transcoding.  In addition to understanding culture, media, and the process of meaning-making, this course focuses on making and managing media across formats, cultural expression, and civic engagement.  Making minimal distinction among (the) media of, on, and in education, the course provides a survey of media studies and new media with an emphasis on media education and literacy.  Media education and literacy are among the most relevant challenges to “official” knowledge and represent key movements in the sociology of curriculum.  Hence, this course balances practice with ethical, legal, and theoretical aspects and emphasizes the design of curriculum and courses for teaching media studies and for integrating media literacy across the curriculum.

EDCP 571: History of Media and Technology in Education (2011)
In this Winter 2011 section, the theme is From Twentieth to Twenty-First Century Learning— proceeding from Edison and motion picture students through McLuhan and new media to telelearning and mobile autodidacticism.  We will address issues such as how, why and to what degree media and technology have been incorporated into, or changed by, education over time.  Some historians argue that media and technology have been an imposition on humanistic curriculum practices; others describe media and technology as the principle means of progress in administration, learning and teaching.  Some lament the separation of curriculum from instruction via media and technology, and subsequent displacement of instructional labour by capital; others champion the creativity and intellectual productivity that media and technology seemingly nourish.  This course is designed from a basis that educational media and technologies are not merely tools; educational premises are neither fully durable nor pliable; and actors or agents of education are not merely humans.

EDCP 562: Introduction to Curriculum Issues and Theories (Digital Learning & Curriculum @ 21st Century Learning) (2011)
What is curriculum studies?  What is the state of research in curriculum studies?  What are the primary challenges of curriculum theory for digital learning, and vice versa?  This course is one of the two core requirements in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy’s graduate program.  We survey a wide range of research and practices in curriculum and pedagogy (C&P) or curriculum and instruction (C&I)— i.e., curriculum studies.  In this winter 2011 section for the Digital Learning and Curriculum (DLC) cohort, we will focus on curriculum theory and a recent survey of curriculum studies with special attention to digital media, technologies, and 21st century learning.  The emphasis is on understanding curriculum as a dynamic discipline or interdiscipline, demanding specific attention to discourses, issues, and practices germane to curriculum studies and digital media or technologies.

CSED 546: Seminar in Teaching and Learning Through Virtual Education Spaces (2010)
This graduate seminar will examine digital media and pedagogy. Globally, information and communication technologies (ICT) are most commonly used both inside and outside of academic institutions when identifying and researching a variety of educational technologies and cultural practices (i.e., digital literacies, ICT literacies, Web 2.0, digital media, social media, educational technologies, learning technologies, new media, new literacies, etc.).

Virtual education spaces such as face‐to‐face, hybrid, and online education learning environments will be examined for how they can be developed, designed, and used to create collaborative communities of practice and active learning.  We will investigate contemporary issues of teaching, learning, media, culture, and education. Philosophical and theoretical perspectives are examined with regards to their association with the use of language and communication practices. Participants will have opportunities to develop and design their own virtual education spaces and examine contemporary digital media issues within the contexts of educational research and theory, with regards to their own personal and professional interests, and across local, regional, national and international points of view.

TSED 508: Seminar on Bruno Latour and Science & Technology Studies (2009)
This seminar focuses on Bruno Latour, arguably the most creative and challenging scholar of Science & Technology Studies (STS) in the world today.  Latour’s reputation and scholarship traverses an extremely wide range of disciplines in addition to STS (e.g., anthropology, art, education, environmental studies, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, sociology, theology, etc.).  We will focus on four of Latour’s most recent texts: We Have Never Been Modern (1993), Pandora’s Hope (1999), The Politics of Nature (2004), and Reassembling the Social (2005).  The seminar is interdisciplinary and inviting by design, and students from any and all disciplines are encouraged to enroll.  We will work systematically through these texts to closely examine Latour’s strategies for doing STS— for researching science, technology, and technoscience as problems in what Haraway calls naturecultures and Stengers calls cosmopolitics.

CSED 546: Seminar in Teaching and Learning Through Virtual Education Spaces (2010)
This graduate seminar will examine digital media and pedagogy. Globally, information and communication technologies (ICT) are most commonly used both inside and outside of academic institutions when identifying and researching a variety of educational technologies and cultural practices (i.e., digital literacies, ICT literacies, Web 2.0, digital media, social media, educational technologies, learning technologies, new media, new literacies, etc.). Virtual education spaces such as face-to-face, hybrid, and online education learning environments will be examined for how they can be developed, designed, and used to create collaborative communities of practice and active learning. We will investigate contemporary issues of teaching, learning, media, culture, and education. Philosophical and theoretical perspectives are examined with regards to their association with the use of language and communication practices. Participants will have opportunities to develop and design their own virtual education spaces and examine contemporary digital media issues within the contexts of educational research and theory, with regards to their own personal and professional interests, and across local, regional, national and international points of view.

TSED 508: Seminar on Bruno Latour and Science & Technology Studies (2009)
This seminar focuses on Bruno Latour, arguably the most creative and challenging scholar of Science & Technology Studies (STS) in the world today. Latour’s reputation and scholarship traverses an extremely wide range of disciplines in addition to STS (e.g., anthropology, art, education, environmental studies, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, sociology, theology, etc.). We will focus on four of Latour’s most recent texts: We Have Never Been Modern (1993), Pandora’s Hope (1999), The Politics of Nature (2004), and Reassembling the Social (2005). The seminar is interdisciplinary and inviting by design, and students from any and all disciplines are encouraged to enroll. We will work systematically through these texts to closely examine Latour’s strategies for doing STS— for researching science, technology, and technoscience as problems in what Haraway calls naturecultures and Stengers calls cosmopolitics.

ETEC 511: Foundations of Educational Technology (2008)
This course provides both a disciplinary tour and poststructuralist deconstruction of the foundations of e-learning, educational technology, learning technologies, and new media.  It addresses the anthropological, economic, historical, phenomenological, philosophical, political, psychological, sociological, and spiritual foundations of educational technology along with a critique of these foundations.  These foundations are cast within a larger framework of ecological-natural, ethical-personal, existential-spiritual, socio-political and technical-empirical dimensions of technology with implications for curriculum and instructional design.  How, why and to what degree have media and technology been incorporated into, or changed by, education and what foundational structures underlie these processes?  How do the processes of foundation building shape educational media, technology or learning technologies?  What happens to e-learning, educational technology, learning technologies, and new media if and when we can no longer rely on their foundations or when foundations shift?  This course is designed from a basis that educational media and learning technologies are not merely tools; educational premises are neither fully durable nor pliable; and actors or agents of education are not merely humans.  It begins with an exploration of the cultural and social foundations of education, and proceeds through disciplinary and interdisciplinary foundations of e-learning, educational technology, learning technologies, and new media and concludes with a critique of these foundations and the cultural studies of educational technology, learning technologies, and new media.

ETEC 531: Cultural and New Media Studies (2008)
New media technologies have intensified and transformed the way we communicate, the way we learn, and the way we teach.  They have, we might say, transformed the student and transformed the teacher.  But what is the nature of these changes?  Cultural and new media studies are specifically oriented toward understanding the ways in which culture, nature and technology are converging to intensify and transform everyday life.  This course provides a forum for exploring technocultural issues such as cyborgs and hybridity, digital property, cyberpunk fiction, the posthuman, AI and AEI, information warfare, virtual reality, third nature and religion.  The course is organized around nine modules that correspond to the chapters and themes in the text, Culture and Technology.

CUST 565: Critical Media Studies and Pedagogy (2008)
This course will be a critical pedagogical examination of media.  It is designed for teachers and cultural workers, and is grounded in the continual struggle for social justice and equity.  Due to the concentrated nature of a two week summer course, students will be expected to do a great deal of reading in a short time, along with viewing assignments and preparation for class.  By blogging daily, we will keep in constant contact with one another as we read media.  As I indicate in the Preface to our text, as inhabitants of the twenty-first, we are media consumers, no matter how insulated we believe we are.  I contend that we have an obligation as teachers to both critically consume/read media, and in turn, to facilitate our students to do so as well.  Critically consuming media insists on a responsible response to corporate, political, and private agendas.

CUST 565: Articulation(s) of Digital Literacies through Ecological Studies (2008)
This advanced level course examines articulation as a form of multi-method inquiry in the design of educational research. Contemporary social practices and educational issues that intersect ecological studies  and digital media will be examined through exploratory cases. The course introduces students to theoretical, philosophical, and practical research dimensions of ecological literacies and digital epistemologies and those multiple inquiry methods that enhance the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. The concept of articulation will be explored as the act of connecting that can make a relation of two or more different  elements, under certain human forces of agency and contextual conditions, which is not necessary,  determined, absolute, or essential for all time. As a researcher, one can ask under what circumstances are connections forged or made? The so-called’ relation of discourse then is the articulation of different and distinct cultural characteristics, which can be (re)articulated in different ways because they have no necessary “belongingness.” Assignments are structured to enable graduate students at different levels in their program to examine the use of multi-method inquiry within their own educational interests and research.

TSED 508: Review of Research in Learning Technologies, New Media and the Learning Sciences (2007)
So you call yourself (or want to be) a learning scientist?  Or do call yourself (and would rather be) a learning technologist or new mediatician?  Or a learning artist?  Doesn’t one imply the other?  Maybe you are (or really want to be) a design-based researcher, establishing yourself in both the learning sciences and the learning technologies.  Or perhaps your answer is “none of the above,” and you are critical and poststructural and want to contradict or deconstruct the learning arts, sciences and technologies.  This course addresses current research in learning technologies, new media and the learning sciences with a focus on “what is cognition in the messy complexity of the real world?,” “how do we learn?” and “how can design-based research help explore these questions?”  The course will challenge you to theorize cognition while conducting research with groups of participants on and off-campus throughout the term.

TSED 508: Review of Research in Cognition, Emotion and Technology: How We Learn (Technology Across the Lifespan) (2005)
At the turn of the early 21st century, to ask the question “how do we learn?” is to ask the question “how do we learn technology across the lifespan?”  However, technological change seems too fierce— too intense— to conclude that learning technology is smooth and developmental.  In this course we will explore interdependencies among cognition, emotion and technology and the way these they play out in the lives of children, adolescents, teenagers and adults.  We will explore school-based studies and workplace studies of how we learn; we will reconcile research into children and technology with research into adult learning and gerontechnology.  How we learn (technology across the lifespan) means asking “how do we age (gracefully) with technology in this new age?”

CUST 565: Review of Research and Theory: Critical Issues of Education, Learning, and Information and Communication Technologies (2005)
This graduate level seminar will examine the social, cultural, political, and economic complexity of contextual conditions associated with educational technologies and elearning environments.  Contemporary issues of learning, education, and information and communication technologies will be critically examined through various philosophical and theoretical perspectives.  Students in this seminar will have the opportunity to examine contemporary (ICT) issues within the contexts of educational research and theory, with regards to their own personal and professional interests and across national and international points of view.

EDCI 601a: Technology, Rights and the Public Interest (2004)
How we use technology and conceptualize its use in education is contingent on how we use and conceptualize rights in the public interest.  This interdisciplinary, research-intensive course explores this connection and provides opportunities for students to publish in special issues of Workplace: A Journal of Academic Labor and Educational Insights.  Topics addressed in the course include academic freedom, intellectual property, the commercialization of education, public knowledge and the open source movement, surveillance and discipline, civil liberties and human rights.

CUST 565: New Media and the Learning Experience (2004)
A critical examination and opportunistic evaluation of the impacts of emerging information, Internet and mobile technologies on education.  This survey course will convene learning industry and technology experts to engage an active discourse with the students on the possible merits and probable pitfalls of proposed applications in learning environments.  The key objective of the course is to provide students with a high-level practical understanding of information technology trends and capabilities within the analytical context of potential value to education.  Students will be asked to present a deeper independent evaluation of a specific emerging technology or technological trend as their primary contribution to the discourse.

CUST 565: New Media and the Future of the Learning Experience (2002)
This is an opportunity aimed at masters and doctoral students with an interest in new media, on-line learning and education technologies. The course is a series of weekly interactive seminars that will introduce a unique perspective on emerging new media technologies in a collaborative, synthetic exploration of potentially appropriate applications in education. With NewMIC guidance, individual participants will also pursue one or more of these technologies for a more detailed analysis. The purpose of this course is to create a dynamic forum for the analysis of the potentials and appropriate applications of emerging new media technologies within education. It will offer participants a practical understanding of the technical foundations of these emerging/converging technologies within a pedagogically analytical framework designed to provide them broad, versatile and lasting skills for the critical assessment (and potentially entrepreneurial development) of new technologies relative to applications in learning and teaching environments.

CUST 565: Education for a Digital Age: How, Why, Who & So What? (2000)
In this course, we will examine the use and production of multimedia in the classroom from a critical pedagogical perspective.  Exploration of the use of new media to enhance learning opportunities both within and beyond the traditional boundaries of school walls will be an important focus of this course.  Because our main focus is learning how to work with teachers to implement new media in their future classrooms, students in this course will be encouraged to define the challenges of implementing technology in school settings to explore workable solutions using real life examples.  Thus, throughout the course, students will produce and evaluate learning materials using computers, video, and other new media and should come equipped with some experience in those areas.  Skill-oriented workshops will be offered for those students with less experience and each student in the studio group will be expected to contribute to this effort.

SCED 565: New Technologies and Methods for Learning (2003)
The rapid influx of new technologies in our schools has been coupled with recent advances in our understanding of how people learn.  In this advanced graduate seminar, we will explore contemporary theoretical perspectives and practical issues associated with learning with these digital technologies, paying close attention to the teacher, the students, and the learning space.  Course participants will analyze the learning and teaching in educational scenarios that integrate, for example, microworlds, dynamic modeling tools, virtual labs, scientific visualization, and computer simulation technologies.  Course participants will consider the cognitive affordances of these technologies to develop their own perspectives on teaching with these technologies and the design of a technology enhanced space.

CUST 565: Integrating Educational Technologies within Teacher Education Practices (2003)
This graduate course explores ideas and issues for instructional application of digital technologies and electronic learning environments in education.  Educational technologies are discussed in relationship to a broad range of formal and informal, classroom-based and community-based environments, and face-to-face, hybrid/mixed mode, or distance educational settings.  Students will examine ways to integrate educational technologies within their own teaching and learning, curriculum development and organization, administration, research, and in facilitating communication strategies for teacher education programs.  The class will involve reading, discussion, collaboration, and independent inquiry.  The purpose of this course is to investigate ways to design, develop and teach with interactive multimedia using critical inquiry.

CUST 565: Cultural and New Media Studies (2000- )
Cultural and media studies continue to be the “hottest thing in the humanities and social sciences,” as a commentator in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicted them in the mid 1990s.  This course provides an introduction into these fields and addresses the ways in which schooling is implicated in politics, practices, and studies of culture and the new media technologies.  We will “do cultural and media studies” as well as utilize the new media to express our work.  This course assumes no prior knowledge of cultural and media theory; rather, the course is designed to survey, in introductory fashion, discourses on the hybrid of culture and commodity form.  Nor does this course assume prior capability in the design of media.  In order to meaningfully “do” cultural and media studies we will attend to the socioeconomic normativity of relations in the production, consumption, and regulation of cultural artifacts and texts.  We conclude with the issue of globalization, the internationalization of cultural and media forms, and the effects of imperialism.  In the spirit of cultural and new media studies, all work we produce– all assignments– will be in non-print forms.

CSED 565: Digital Media Technology in Learning, Teaching, & Research (1999)
This course interdisciplinary course is designed as a new media workshop and seminar to explore cognitivist, constructionist, ecological, feminist, and situated approaches to learning. We will explore the nature of these distinctions and examine how they overlap in the context of the technology-intensive learning environment. We will start with an examination of the relationships among learning, design, and critique. And we will build a common new media artifact that connects our process of learning with the process of design. Multiple viewpoints of the objects we create will enhance our understanding of how technologies “live” in situ, how context shapes learning, and how knowledge is not a commodity but rather a shared construction that is situated within a community of inquiry. Or, we will find yet a new way to think about these issues that extend the current view. The course is not designed as a didactic experience but rather an exploration into conceptual and practical concerns as digital media technologies become pervasive in every aspect of our learning, teaching, and research lives.

CSED 565: The Multimedia Classroom: Creating an Electronic Space for Learners (1998)
This course is a design course.  The philosophy underlying it is that knowledge of a subject matter is constructed by interacting with it in many diverse ways and through many media forms.  In this course, learners will have an opportunity not only to make electronic artifacts but also to reflect upon the process of their own constructions. Students should think of this course as a design studio course where making and deconstruction of their artifacts become ways of learning about other learn in electronic classrooms that are both real and virtual.  The educational philosophy underlying this course emphasizes that learning is a discovery process and teaching is a communication process.  Multimedia tools are especially suited for making “discoveries” and communicating those discoveries.  In fact, in working with multimedia tools, students begin to understand that the two processes are not distinct pursuits but rather part of the same experience.

CUST 510: Video Ethnography in Education Research (1997- )
This advanced level methodology course is an exploratory graduate course in using digital video for qualitative research studies.  It introduces the theoretical and practical background required to gather and interpret video data.  Assignments permit students to relate the use of video technologies to their own research interests. It will also provide a vehicle for discussing the implications of using new tools and techniques when conducting ethnographic research.  Topics covered will include audience inter activity and engagement; conventions and genres of educational video; the politics of representation; aesthetics; audience/producer relations; and getting ideas, arguments, “lessons,” positions, relations and interruptions, on tape.

This course supports students in exploring video ethnography for education.  “Education” is broadly defined, and includes settings such as classrooms, communities, educational activism, museums and galleries, public spaces and multimedia.  We will give close attention to questions about the place of video ethnography and exhibition in a variety of educational settings.  We will raise questions about the appropriateness of student experiments and projects to intended audiences and contexts of exhibition; the social, cultural, and political relations between videomakers and their “subjects” and audiences; and the relation between video production for education and the social constructions of meaning and knowledge.

CUST 565: Liberal Education— Mathematics, Science and Technology (1997)
This course examines mathematics, science and technology as elements of liberal or general education.  The claims of those subjects, their natures, their relative social and epistemological standings and their joint and independent existences in the curriculum are explored.  The challenge of practical relevance— or situatedness, is examined. Constructivist and cross-cultural perspectives on the teaching of these subjects are explored.  Prospects for a unitary curriculum in which these subjects find their fullest expression even as they co-relate, are explored.

TSED 565: The Philosophy of Technology (1996)
This seminar is based on a critical reading of the philosophy of technology and postmodern readings of technology.  In Questioning Technology, how does Mitcham suggest technology can be questioned?  What does he mean by ideas about, rather than theories of, technology?  What is technology?  Is technology always good or useful?  What constitutes goodness within technology?  What is the logic of technological thought and action?  What kind of reality do technological objects possess?  What kind of logic do engineering science contain?  What is the meaning of technology¬¬¬— that is, how is technology related to other aspects of human life?¬  The course addresses conceptual issues (e.g., science and technology, applied science), ethical issues, political philosophy, and religious and metaphysical issues (e.g., Technological Determinism, Autonomous Technology, Progress, Spiritualness of matter and nature).  What is the goal of the questioning of technology?  “It is not to serve technology.”

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