Digital Literacy Centre

Networked Book

August 5th, 2009 · No Comments

The following is from http://networkedbook.org/ an interesting project to create collaborative articles and essays in the form of commentary, translation and revision. Its focus is network culture. It still uses the term “book,” which is interesting, perhaps temporary, and perhaps an opening for considerations of predominating frames in discourse. Of course it is as valid to ask why not book, as much as why – taking into account that these terms are as fluid and mutable as any cultural language.

Here is the About section quoted:

“A networked book is an open book designed to be written, edited and read in a networked environment.” — Institute for the Future of the Book

In 2007, Jo-Anne Green and Helen Thorington (Co-Directors, New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. | Turbulence.org) proposed Networked to Eduardo Navas (NewMediaFIX). Along with Sean Dockray (Telic Arts Exchange) and Anne Bray (Freewaves), they developed an application to the National Endowment for the Arts, which funded the project in 2008.

An international Call for Proposals was issued. It defined the project’s Goals and Objectives and invited contributions that critically and creatively rethink how networked art is categorized, analyzed, legitimized — and by whom — as norms of authority, trust, authenticity and legitimacy evolve. A committee of nine reviewed the submissions: four authors were commissioned to develop chapters that are now open for commentary, revision, and translation. A fifth — one of the runners-up — was invited to contribute. Networked is open to additional chapters. See Guidelines.

Networked proposes that a history or critique of interactive and/or participatory art must itself be interactive and/or participatory; that the technologies used to create a work suggest new forms a “text” might take.

Tags: Digital Literacy · Digital Resource · Social Media

Humanities Visualization

July 6th, 2009 · No Comments

Dr Stan Ruecker is at the Digital Literacy Centre’s Summer Institute this week talking about humanities visualization, an alternative strategy to data visualization, and performing workshops with Dr Teresa Dobson (Director of the DLC) on Digital Applications for Knowledge Visualization. One of the tools being examined is the Mandala Rich Prospect Browser.

Here is a site where you can read about and play around with a current prototype:

Mandala Rich Prospect Browser

“The Mandala Browser is a rich prospect browsing concept that allows users to explore a data set using multiple criteria. Unlike boolean searching, the Mandala Browser permits a more nuanced search by allowing users to determine the strength of each criterion. Its design allows enormous flexibility in terms of the number of criteria used, the number of items represented, and the types of items represented.” (From http://mandala.humviz.org/)

Tags: Digital Literacy Centre

Welcome to Digital Literacy Centre Web Log

November 4th, 2008 · No Comments

This Web Log presents a forum for the examination and discussion of research and development in digital literacy and digital humanities. It is hosted by the Digital Literacy Centre (DLC), which is situated in the Department of Language and Literacy Education (LLED), located at the Vancouver campus. We encourage participation and collaboration in the understanding and construction of ideas and best practices in this area of study as we seek to contribute to a diverse field of interest and build community. The DLC is interested in digital literacy related (but not restricted) to: online collaborative social networks for learning, the social production of cultural languages, new theories and developments in learning technologies, electronic literature, linguistics in online environments, and the exploration of the humanities in digital culture. We look forward to hearing your ideas.

Tags: Digital Literacy Centre