Educator’s Resources – Only the Beginning

Module 2 Posts 1-5:

Orange Shirt Day at our School is one of the most important days of the year. It is a time where we ask our students, staff and school community to take a look back at parts of Canadian history we are not proud of. We are also asking our school community to also look forward, to help understand, and to learn so that the events of the past do not repeat themselves.

 

I’ve been spending a lot of time searching for resources to help teachers as they utilize Indigenous knowledge, teachings, and history into all areas of the curriculum.

 

Post 1:

Province of Manitoba: Education – Life/Work Exploration

https://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/cardev/gr9_found/courage_poster.pdf

This is a link to a visual, and a detailed description of the Circle of Courage, the philosophy behind and its basis stemming from the four universal growth needs of children: Spirit of Independence, Spirit of Mastery,Spirit of Belonging, and the Spirit of Generosity.

 

 

Orange Shirt Day at our School is one of the most important days of the year. It is a time where we ask our students, staff and school community to take a look back at parts of Canadian history we are not proud of. We are also asking our school community to also look forward, to help understand, and to learn so that the events of the past do not repeat themselves.

 

I’ve been spending a lot of time searching for resources to help teachers as they utilize Indigenous knowledge, teachings, and history into all areas of the curriculum.

 

Post 2:

 

http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/deepeningknowledge/Teacher_Resources/Infusing_Aboriginal_Content_and_Perspectives_into_Your_Teaching/index.html

This guide, from the University of Toronto, assists teachers in infusing Indigenous content and perspective into different areas of the curriculum. It can be arranged by grade, subject area, “First Nations Representation in the Media”, as well as links to You Tube videos where students have asked an elder why certain things are the way they are https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzZWSZP2fvBfXqOdhyBHGGQ/videos

 

Post 3

They Came for The Children – The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

http://www.myrobust.com/websites/trcinstitution/File/2039_T&R_eng_web%5b1%5d.pdf

 

This report was published by The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada to educate about Canadian residential schools and this horrific part of Canadian history.

 

Post 4

https://bctf.ca/IssuesInEducation.aspx?id=13404

The BCTF provides a small (but hopefully growing) collection of resources to assist educators as Indigenous knowledge is infused throughout the curriculum. As I have seen more substantial resources for other Provinces, I am hopeful that educators, and students of courses, such as this one, will provide BC teachers with a more comprehensive and thorough body of knowledge.

 

Post 5

 

Carolyn Roberts

https://www.carolynroberts.net

I am privileged and very proud to call Carolyn a colleague in my school district. I have witnessed her hard work and dedication to assisting students and educators of all backgrounds to learn about Aboriginal ways of knowing. Carolyn’s website has a number of links literature, lesson plans, You Tube Videos, and a variety of other resources.

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One comment

  1. Hi Natalie,

    I think last year I did a Pro-D with Carolyn on outdoor education at Stanley Park. Under her lesson plans, she did showed one about the learning about the cedar tree. I have yet to try this lesson out, but I remember how much I enjoyed Pro-D-Day learning about the different types of trees there were at Stanley Park. This showed me that we can take learning outside of the four walls and bring it into our environment.

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