Tag Archives: Media

Module 1 – The Global and the Local in Indigenous Knowledge

1. My first resource link is simply a link to a poster; however, I feel that the poster is so important as an educator attempting to integrate First Nations learning concepts into my own teaching, and in respecting the fact that all people and cultures learn in different ways. This link is for the First Peoples Principles of Learning poster. I have one in my classroom that my students and I refer to often.

http://www.fnesc.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/PUB-LFP-POSTER-Principles-of-Learning-First-Peoples-poster-11×17.pdf

2. My second link is to the First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC) website. FNESC is a provincial-level committee that works to improve the quality of education and success for all First Nations learners in British Columbia. The FNESC website offers links to programs, a wide range of resources, post secondary education links (news, resources, and programs), and current as well as archived news articles related to First Nations education.

http://www.fnesc.ca/

3. My third link is to a collaborative and multi-group curriculum development project based on the traditions of the Witsuwit’en people of Northwestern British Columbia. This series of twenty-two short videos (the twenty-third video is a thank you to contributors and runs like the final “credits” portion of a movie) offer audiences the opportunity to view images from the 1920’s combined with recent images and interviews of the Witsuwit’en people, showing how traditions have been preserved and carried on today. This link appealed to me because of the readings in weeks one and two of ETEC 521 which discussed media representation of First Nations people and the preservation of traditions and culture.

http://lsc.sd54.bc.ca/index.php/video-files

4. My fourth link is to an article titled ” Children as citizens of First Nations: Linking Indigenous health to early childhood development” by Margo Greenwood (Paediatr Child Health. 2005 Nov; 10(9): 553-555). This article looks at early childhood programs for First Nations children, and the connection between health and well-being and preservation of culture and traditions. Greenwood discusses the diminished level of health for First Nations people across Canada and questions the values and ideologies imparted on First Nations youth through our typical early childhood development programs. Greenwood examines the fact that programs are generally based on a “school readiness goal” that is often not connected to the values and beliefs of Indigenous people. I found this article very interesting in terms of the links between educating First Nations children in culture, language and traditions, and the potential impacts on their overall health and well-being in the future.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2722642/

5. My fifth link is to a National Post article “Native education problems won’t be fixed through more funding, study says” (Clarke, K., August 2014). I have included this article not because I find it a valuable resource necessarily, but because I believe it calls to question how dominant society and media view “success” in terms of First Nations learners. The article cites a study done by the Fraser Institute and refers to the author of the report, Ravina Baines, as saying that “Closer ties to a provincial system or replication of the provincial structure could improve graduation rates on reserves.” Because of the readings for the first three weeks of this course, I question the article’s foundations, and I question the implication that the “problems” with First Nations education on reserves are basically that the education given is not one created by the dominant society. Is it fair to judge how “successful” a system is based only on the values and beliefs of the dominant culture? I feel the article paints a negative picture of schools on reservations and I suppose I question the approach that is taken in the article. I feel that this article could lead to valuable discussions about what “success” truly means and what it means that an institute study and media are promoting the view that reserve schools could potentially fix their “problems” by aligning themselves more closely to dominant societal educational values and beliefs. It feels like colonialism in a less overt form to me.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/native-education-problems-wont-be-fixed-with-more-funding-study-says

5 Links to Articles – Exploring Indigeneity the Arts and Technology

https://cjee.lakeheadu.ca/article/view/871/533

This article explores art education and place-based education as a means of developing ecological literacy. It explores the integration of the real-world, community-centred learning of place-based education with art. It provides information about a model art and environmental educators to create experiences for students regarding self and community.

http://mediasmarts.ca/digital-media-literacy/media-issues/diversity-media/aboriginal-people/aboriginal-expression-arts-media

This article explores aboriginal expression in the arts and media. It explores tv, film, theater, radio and music networks and the internet. It explores opposing viewpoints including the erosional of cultural foundations  and the empowerment in reappropriating various forms of artistic representation.

http://muskratmagazine.com/pass-the-feather-to-me-aboriginal-arts-collective/

This is the website of Muskrat magazine and the article “Pass the faether to Me” Aboriginal Arts Collective” promotes a classroom art exchange program between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth, teachers and artists. It promotes using visual culture to transcend logistic and financial barriers and is attempting to create co-operative and respectful interrelations for future generations. MUSKRAT is an on-line Indigenous arts, culture magazine that exhibits original works and critical commentary. It’s mandate is to use media arts, the Internet, and wireless technology to investigate and disseminate traditional knowledges in ways that inspire their reclamation.

http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/article/view/1769/1889

This article from the Canadian Journal of Communication Explores the idea of  “Travelling Through Layers” and how  Inuit artists are beginning to appropriate new technologies. It discusses how the Inuit are mapping traditional concepts, values, and metaphors to make sense of contemporary realities and technologies.

http://www.native-art-in-canada.com/woodlandsschool.html

This article discusses the Woodlands School of Art and the impact Norval Morrisseau had on the changing the conversation in the universe about what it means to be native. Norval’s belief that the process of learning is essential to culture and so is the process of teaching culture was expressed through art. It discusses Ojibwa Culture and Art and how art can be used to bridge gaps within and between cultures.

 

My Research Findings – 1

What is the purpose of aboriginal education and technology? As all of us are researching and find documentation to support any ideas or theories that we are bringing forward, it is quite difficult filtering based on our needs due to the broad nature of our topic.

 

The following link is in UBC library about Bretts’ dissertation regarding his recommendations of Cowichan education. Cowichan tribes has over 4,800 registered members as is one of the largest sing First Nation Band in British Columbia. From Bretts statistics, 16,000 young people drop out of highschool yearly in B.C. He is using a lot of various resources and statistics to help gain some understanding of what the need is for education among the Cowichan people in School District 79. I found it very interesting as it brings some recommendations for education and possible use of technology.

http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/docview/304669575?accountid=14656

1. Betts DP. Continuing education in the cowichan valley. [Order No. MQ49161]. Royal Roads University (Canada); 2000.

This article online discusses some of the problems that Natives face living on the reservation. The article discusses Mike McKenzie and essentially colonialism. Statistics are provided to supplement some of the major issues around reservations. It touches a little around the educational aspects and the presented (or rejected) solutions to bringing education in reservations. I’m sure many British Columbia teachers and educators could agree with some of the financial issues surrounding educational funding. It may not be a direct impact to technology or the influence technology has upon First nations, but it would bring a necessity to having a new form of cheaper education that could prove successful with limited resources.

http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/why-fixing-first-nations-education-remains-so-far-out-of-reach/

This article may have been found by my previous classmates, but I find it relevant to module 1. This article discusses in direct relation to media, aboriginals, and the possible impact it has.

https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/canada/missing-where-are-first-nations-national-media

I like this very simple article because it is showing some other places and positive effects that educational technology is bringing among Indigeous people.

http://fortsevern.firstnation.ca/node/144

I really enjoyed this last page, as it brings forward a lot of module 1 readings. Either supporting or denying some of the ideas brought out from our week 1 and 2 readings.

http://apr.thompsonbooks.com/vols/APR_Vol_6Ch8.pdf

 

I hope these help people!

 

Myth Busting: Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Screen Shot 2015-11-29 at 4.43.16 PMIn 2012 the TD bank put together a report, entitled Debunking Myths Surrounding Canada’s Aboriginal Population. based on their own findings and the findings of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business. The purpose was to set the record straight, and replace stereotypes with facts to foster an enlightened national conversation.

References

Two Row Times

Two Row Times: The Spirit of all Nations

Two Row Times is an Ontario based weekly print and online newspaper which covers Indigenous issues. Local, regional, national and international news stories are featured, as well  arts, sports and health & wellness. There is quite a variety of topics which are covered. For people like me, who have never attended a pow-wow, there is a useful article on the Do’s and Don’t of attending pow-wows.

I was also impressed at the number of social media outlets utilized.

social media links

mediaINDIGENA Podcast

This podcast by mediaINDIGENA discusses James Daspchuk’s book Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life, and Canada’s Aboriginal policy of displacement through starvation.

“Western Canada lost a third of the population within six years.”

The mediaINDIGENA site is a a multimedia, interactive e-magizine which is a collection of works by 10 Aboriginal bloggers.

3.3: Indigenous Feature Film Production in Canada: A National and International Perspective

Study can be found at this website

This is a large study by ImagineNative Film and Media Arts Festival that examines Aboriginal film production in Canada. This study makes the case that First Nations’ stories represent a huge untapped resource in Canada. Canada’s film industry has not yet fully explored the stories of indigenous peoples. Not only are these stories important to our collective identity as Canadians, but they also enormous commercial potential.

Who owns Native Culture?

1

http://web.williams.edu/AnthSoc/native/index.htm

Based on the book of the same name Michael Brown created a website focussing on the ongoing “legal status of indigenous art, music, folklore, biological knowledge, and sacred sites.”

Of particular interest are the many links that are aligned to chapters in his book. Brown discusses the importance of protecting the culture for those it represents.

This site is an excellent resource for anyone interested in the topic of cultural protection in general and through online means. It is also a great site for insights into legal rights claims and the implications on communities.

*Note that while most links on the site are still active and relevant Brown has stopped updating the site as of April 2014. It is still however, a worthwhile resource.

Module 2 – Post 1
Ryan Silverthorne