Define

 Second project milestone: Define

Deliverable #1 – Draft Ethics Materials

Instructions:

  • Start by generating a list of focal points that capture the direction for the project. This should be derived from the sources you reviewed in your annotated bibliography, including the research literature and examples of existing technologies. In other words, where are the gaps?  Through team discussion, narrow the broader list to create a cohesive focus to the question, “What do we want to know?”.
  • Based on your design direction, decide how you will engage with potential users using field methods such as interviews, observations and questionnaires. It is a good idea to use more than one method to gather information.  For example, you could ask to observe a potential user using a related technology and then interview them about their experience.  If you choose to do interviews (3-5), you will need fewer people than if you select to survey people (>10). Be mindful of trade-offs like time and depth of information that can be acquired using different methods.
  • Prepare your interview protocols, questionnaires and observation checklists, consent forms, debriefing forms (if using), recruitment notices, and proposed procedures. Bring these to class where we will workshop and help you refine them.
  • Revise your study materials based on the feedback you receive. Recruit your participants and collect your data using appropriate techniques such as audio recording and note taking. All data should be shared and stored according to UBC data management guidelines (i.e., no sharing data files or consent forms in Google docs!)
  • Analyze the data you have collected according to major themes and ideas that emerge and the implications of these on design.

Deliverable #1

Draft ethics materials for in-class workshop: consent form, procedure, recruitment emails/posts, questionnaires, interview and observation protocols, debriefing forms and bring them to class for workshopping

 

Deliverable #2 – Conducting Field Work (Team Report)

Instructions:

  • Start by generating a list of focal points that capture the direction for the project. This should be derived from the sources you reviewed in your annotated bibliography, including the research literature and examples of existing technologies. In other words, where are the gaps?  Through team discussion, narrow the broader list to create a cohesive focus to the question, “What do we want to know?”.
  • Based on your design direction, decide how you will engage with potential users using field methods such as interviews, observations and questionnaires. It is a good idea to use more than one method to gather information.  For example, you could ask to observe a potential user using a related technology and then interview them about their experience.  If you choose to do interviews (3-5), you will need fewer people than if you select to survey people (>10). Be mindful of trade-offs like time and depth of information that can be acquired using different methods.
  • Prepare your interview protocols, questionnaires and observation checklists, consent forms, debriefing forms (if using), recruitment notices, and proposed procedures. Bring these to class where we will workshop and help you refine them.
  • Revise your study materials based on the feedback you receive. Recruit your participants and collect your data using appropriate techniques such as audio recording and note taking. All data should be shared and stored according to UBC data management guidelines (i.e., no sharing data files or consent forms in Google docs!)
  • Analyze the data you have collected according to major themes and ideas that emerge and the implications of these on design.

 

Deliverable #2: Report

Introduction

  • What did you seek to find out in talking to potential users? What were the main questions you sought to answer?

Methods

  • Participants and recruitment: who were your participants (e.g., “students aged 19-24″) and specifics of how you recruited them, e.g., convenience, purposive, or snowball sampling.
  • Study materials: describe the nature of the observation, survey or interviews you conducted. This does not mean you list all of the interview questions.  You might say, “Semi-structured interview questions were created to capture participants experiences of online banking.  These were related to perceptions of trust in sharing information through the site, ease of accessing their account information and performing transactions, and locating financial planning information.”
  • Procedure: Describe, step-by-step, your interactions with participants, from sending the recruitment notice to thanking them for being part of your study.
  • Process for secure data storage and management.

Results

  • Process for collating team members’ data and analyzing the data. For example, questionnaires with small samples often lend themselves to being put in an excel workbook and using descriptive statistics (means, standard deviations, frequencies) whereas qualitative content analysis may be used for interviews.
  • Findings: What did you find out? Use tables, figures, participant quotes, and textual themes as appropriate to your method of data collection to describe the results.
  • Ensure that what you are claiming as a finding is well-supported by the evidence you are presenting.

General notes:

  • If you are using an existing data source (e.g., interview questions adopted from another study) then this should be clearly stated, along with parameters and permissions for use.
  • Include the consent forms, full instruments, recruitment notices and debriefing forms as Appendices. These should be labelled A, B, C and their order is determined based on the order they are mentioned in the body of the report.  There should be a corresponding reference in the body of the report, e.g., Appendix A.
  • Do not turn in signed consent forms or “raw” data.
  • The report should be polished and proofread. It should include the names of team members, page numbers and headings for the major sections.
  • Length: 3-5 pages, 11-12-point font, 1.5 spacing
  • Submit a pdf of the report, filename: “Define-report-<team name>.pdf”